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What is antifa? And what do its supporters want?
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Oct 17, 2020 16:28:04   #
TommyRadd Loc: Midwest USA
 
Gatsby wrote:
So you are a P.R. Rep. for those terrorist bastards, I'm not a bit surprised.


Nailed it!

Reply
Oct 17, 2020 16:47:23   #
Crayons Loc: St Jo, Texas
 
All the white 'Black-Lies-Matter' and 'KlanTeeFa' agitators are all on the same team.
I was watchin last night's riot brigades on the you tube and a bunch of em got off the same tour bus

Reply
Oct 18, 2020 05:27:11   #
Tug484
 
rumitoid wrote:
Antifa has seen a steady increase in media attention ever since President Donald Trump was first inaugurated in January 2017. Republicans often portray antifa as a highly organized group of "terrorists" worthy of national watch lists.

Right-wing media blames antifa members for rioting and looting. Democrats have also condemned such violence, but many on the left say the rhetoric about antifa is greatly exaggerated, and that it's less of an organized movement than just something of "an idea."

But much of what politicians say about antifa isn't quite true. Here's what antifa is, what it isn't, and what you need to know.

Anti, anti, anti...

Antifa is not a highly organized movement, nor is it merely an idea. Antifa is a loose affiliation of local activists scattered across the United States and a few other countries.

The term "antifa" is short for antifascist; it's used both by its adherents and its foes.

In general, people who identify as antifa are known not for what they support, but what they oppose: Fascism, nationalism, far-right ideologies, white supremacy, authoritarianism, racism, homophobia and xenophobia. Some antifa activists also denounce capitalism and the government overall.

Mostly, people aligned with antifa are on the left of the political spectrum. Antifa is not, however, affiliated with Joe Biden, the Democratic Party or its leaders. Biden has condemned antifa and called violence "unacceptable."

Antifa actions have included everything from tracking and publicly identifying members of alt-right groups to physically attacking adversaries.

In "Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook," author Mark Bray, an organizer for the Occupy Wall Street movement, lays out antifa's methods this way:

"Despite the media portrayal of a deranged, bloodthirsty antifa… the vast majority of anti-fascist tactics involve no physical violence whatsoever. Anti-fascists conduct research on the far right online, in person, and sometimes through infiltrations; they dox them, push central milieux to disown them, pressure bosses to fire them…

"But it's also true that some of them punch Nazis in the face and don't apologize for it."

During public demonstrations, antifa activists often wear top-to-toe black; even before the coronavirus pandemic, they were also known for wearing face coverings at public gatherings.

Antifa has no official national leadership, though followers have organized themselves into small, local cells that sometimes coordinate with other movements, such as Black Lives Matter. Some self-described antifa adherents have organized to confront Patriot Prayer, the Proud Boys, and other far-right groups during public demonstrations. Some of those rallies have devolved into violence.

Some antifa adherents keep a very low profile, while other local groups venture to give themselves a more public profile with a name and a website. One of the oldest such groups appears to be Rose City Antifa, which says it was founded in Portland, Oregon, in 2007. According to its website, its main focus is "any work that prevents fascist organizing, and when that is not possible, provides consequences to fascist organizers. This is supported by researching and tracking fascist organizations."

Antifa in prime time

Over President Trump's years in office, coverage of "antifa" has skyrocketed in the mainstream press. That coverage started on the day of his inauguration, when dozens of people took to the streets of the nation's capital in a protest that would soon grow violent. Authorities would later arrest several dozen of them, many of whom later identified themselves as antifa, and accuse them of starting fires and riots. Charges were eventually dropped for the bulk of the defendants, while others were acquitted by juries.

President Trump pointed a finger at what he called the "alt-left" following the infamous "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia in 2017. After a white supremacist deliberately plowed his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing a woman named Heather Heyer, Mr. Trump sparked more outrage when he suggested an equivalency between the white supremacists and the protesters on the other side, who despite his claims were mostly peaceful.

"What about the alt-left that came charging at, what you say, the alt-right?" Mr. Trump wondered aloud. "Do they have any semblance of guilt? What about the fact they're charging with clubs in their hands, swinging clubs, do they have any problem? I think they do."

In the years since then, media coverage has identified antifa as participants, and sometimes agitators, in clashes at numerous rallies and protests around the country. That includes a 2017 anti-hate rally in Berkeley, California, and a Patriot Prayer "freedom rally" in Portland, Oregon, in 2018.

In at least one instance, a person self-identifying as an antifa supporter has been linked to a deadly attack at a protest. Michael Forest Reinoehl, 48, was considered a prime suspect in the August 2020 killing of 39-year-old Aaron "Jay" Danielson, a right-wing activist who was shot during heated demonstrations in Portland. Reinoehl was later shot to death by federal authorities as they moved to arrest him.

Reinoehl had described himself in a social media post as "100% ANTIFA."

The "T" word

In the summer of 2019, Republican Senators Ted Cruz and Bill Cassidy introduced a resolution calling for antifa to be labeled as a domestic terror organization. President Trump voiced his support on Twitter.

Major consideration is being given to naming ANTIFA an “ORGANIZATION OF TERROR.” Portland is being watched very closely. Hopefully the Mayor will be able to properly do his job!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 17, 2019

But the Trump administration's own Department of Homeland Security and FBI don't appear to view antifa as a leading threat. A DHS draft document from September 2020 reportedly named white supremacist groups as the biggest terror threat to America. That same document doesn't mention antifa at all.

The FBI also considers far-right groups the "top of the priority list." FBI director Christopher Wray said in February 2020 that the FBI places the risk of violence from racially-motivated extremist groups "on the same footing" as the threat posed by foreign terrorist organizations such as ISIS and its sympathizers.

That's not to say the FBI hasn't also taken aim at antifa. After arson and looting broke out amid the protests in Minneapolis following the death of George Floyd, Wray said: "We're seeing people who are exploiting this situation to pursue violent, extremist agendas — anarchists like ANTIFA, and other agitators. These individuals have set out to sow discord and upheaval, rather than join in the righteous pursuit of equality and justice."

But the idea of designating antifa a terror group worries some civil rights advocates.

"The designation would grant federal law enforcement broad powers, under the federal terrorism code, to surveil and investigate anyone labeled as antifa," the Southern Poverty Law Center said in a statement. "It could also allow federal law enforcement to broadly target anyone involved in protests viewed unfavorably by the Trump administration, even retroactively."

The center added, "President Trump's announcement is rooted in politics, not the present realities of the terror threat in the U.S."

False flags

Antifa has earned its reputation for sporadic violence. But many other rumors about antifa have been spun from whole cloth, sometimes by people later identified as right-wing extremists. In June 2020, Twitter shut down multiple fake antifa accounts that were inciting violence against white suburbs; subsequent investigations tracked the accounts to Identity Evropa, a white supremacist organization.

Right-wing figures and other commentators on social media also have falsely accused unspecified antifa members of starting wildfires on the West Coast, prompting police and fire officials to appeal to the public to stop spreading what one agency called "an UNTRUE rumor."

Another common conspiracy theory has alleged, without evidence, that billionaire philanthropist George Soros is funding antifa.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/antifa-supporters-want-175921899.html
Antifa has seen a steady increase in media attenti... (show quote)



Antifa is exactly what it claims it fights against.
They won't spare you either if it comes down to it.

Reply
 
 
Oct 18, 2020 05:42:07   #
Peewee Loc: San Antonio, TX
 
rumitoid wrote:
Leslie Gornstein
Fri, October 16, 2020, 11:59 AM MDT

Antifa has seen a steady increase in media attention ever since President Donald Trump was first inaugurated in January 2017. Republicans often portray antifa as a highly organized group of "terrorists" worthy of national watch lists.

Right-wing media blames antifa members for rioting and looting. Democrats have also condemned such violence, but many on the left say the rhetoric about antifa is greatly exaggerated, and that it's less of an organized movement than just something of "an idea."

But much of what politicians say about antifa isn't quite true. Here's what antifa is, what it isn't, and what you need to know.

Anti, anti, anti...

Antifa is not a highly organized movement, nor is it merely an idea. Antifa is a loose affiliation of local activists scattered across the United States and a few other countries.

The term "antifa" is short for antifascist; it's used both by its adherents and its foes.

In general, people who identify as antifa are known not for what they support, but what they oppose: Fascism, nationalism, far-right ideologies, white supremacy, authoritarianism, racism, homophobia and xenophobia. Some antifa activists also denounce capitalism and the government overall.

Mostly, people aligned with antifa are on the left of the political spectrum. Antifa is not, however, affiliated with Joe Biden, the Democratic Party or its leaders. Biden has condemned antifa and called violence "unacceptable."

Antifa actions have included everything from tracking and publicly identifying members of alt-right groups to physically attacking adversaries.

In "Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook," author Mark Bray, an organizer for the Occupy Wall Street movement, lays out antifa's methods this way:

"Despite the media portrayal of a deranged, bloodthirsty antifa… the vast majority of anti-fascist tactics involve no physical violence whatsoever. Anti-fascists conduct research on the far right online, in person, and sometimes through infiltrations; they dox them, push central milieux to disown them, pressure bosses to fire them…

"But it's also true that some of them punch Nazis in the face and don't apologize for it."

During public demonstrations, antifa activists often wear top-to-toe black; even before the coronavirus pandemic, they were also known for wearing face coverings at public gatherings.

Antifa has no official national leadership, though followers have organized themselves into small, local cells that sometimes coordinate with other movements, such as Black Lives Matter. Some self-described antifa adherents have organized to confront Patriot Prayer, the Proud Boys, and other far-right groups during public demonstrations. Some of those rallies have devolved into violence.

Some antifa adherents keep a very low profile, while other local groups venture to give themselves a more public profile with a name and a website. One of the oldest such groups appears to be Rose City Antifa, which says it was founded in Portland, Oregon, in 2007. According to its website, its main focus is "any work that prevents fascist organizing, and when that is not possible, provides consequences to fascist organizers. This is supported by researching and tracking fascist organizations."

Antifa in prime time

Over President Trump's years in office, coverage of "antifa" has skyrocketed in the mainstream press. That coverage started on the day of his inauguration, when dozens of people took to the streets of the nation's capital in a protest that would soon grow violent. Authorities would later arrest several dozen of them, many of whom later identified themselves as antifa, and accuse them of starting fires and riots. Charges were eventually dropped for the bulk of the defendants, while others were acquitted by juries.

President Trump pointed a finger at what he called the "alt-left" following the infamous "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia in 2017. After a white supremacist deliberately plowed his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing a woman named Heather Heyer, Mr. Trump sparked more outrage when he suggested an equivalency between the white supremacists and the protesters on the other side, who despite his claims were mostly peaceful.

"What about the alt-left that came charging at, what you say, the alt-right?" Mr. Trump wondered aloud. "Do they have any semblance of guilt? What about the fact they're charging with clubs in their hands, swinging clubs, do they have any problem? I think they do."

In the years since then, media coverage has identified antifa as participants, and sometimes agitators, in clashes at numerous rallies and protests around the country. That includes a 2017 anti-hate rally in Berkeley, California, and a Patriot Prayer "freedom rally" in Portland, Oregon, in 2018.

In at least one instance, a person self-identifying as an antifa supporter has been linked to a deadly attack at a protest. Michael Forest Reinoehl, 48, was considered a prime suspect in the August 2020 killing of 39-year-old Aaron "Jay" Danielson, a right-wing activist who was shot during heated demonstrations in Portland. Reinoehl was later shot to death by federal authorities as they moved to arrest him.

Reinoehl had described himself in a social media post as "100% ANTIFA."

The "T" word

In the summer of 2019, Republican Senators Ted Cruz and Bill Cassidy introduced a resolution calling for antifa to be labeled as a domestic terror organization. President Trump voiced his support on Twitter.

Major consideration is being given to naming ANTIFA an “ORGANIZATION OF TERROR.” Portland is being watched very closely. Hopefully the Mayor will be able to properly do his job!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 17, 2019

But the Trump administration's own Department of Homeland Security and FBI don't appear to view antifa as a leading threat. A DHS draft document from September 2020 reportedly named white supremacist groups as the biggest terror threat to America. That same document doesn't mention antifa at all.

The FBI also considers far-right groups the "top of the priority list." FBI director Christopher Wray said in February 2020 that the FBI places the risk of violence from racially-motivated extremist groups "on the same footing" as the threat posed by foreign terrorist organizations such as ISIS and its sympathizers.

That's not to say the FBI hasn't also taken aim at antifa. After arson and looting broke out amid the protests in Minneapolis following the death of George Floyd, Wray said: "We're seeing people who are exploiting this situation to pursue violent, extremist agendas — anarchists like ANTIFA, and other agitators. These individuals have set out to sow discord and upheaval, rather than join in the righteous pursuit of equality and justice."

But the idea of designating antifa a terror group worries some civil rights advocates.

"The designation would grant federal law enforcement broad powers, under the federal terrorism code, to surveil and investigate anyone labeled as antifa," the Southern Poverty Law Center said in a statement. "It could also allow federal law enforcement to broadly target anyone involved in protests viewed unfavorably by the Trump administration, even retroactively."

The center added, "President Trump's announcement is rooted in politics, not the present realities of the terror threat in the U.S."

False flags

Antifa has earned its reputation for sporadic violence. But many other rumors about antifa have been spun from whole cloth, sometimes by people later identified as right-wing extremists. In June 2020, Twitter shut down multiple fake antifa accounts that were inciting violence against white suburbs; subsequent investigations tracked the accounts to Identity Evropa, a white supremacist organization.

Leslie Gornstein
Fri, October 16, 2020, 11:59 AM MDT

Antifa has seen a steady increase in media attention ever since President Donald Trump was first inaugurated in January 2017. Republicans often portray antifa as a highly organized group of "terrorists" worthy of national watch lists.

Right-wing media blames antifa members for rioting and looting. Democrats have also condemned such violence, but many on the left say the rhetoric about antifa is greatly exaggerated, and that it's less of an organized movement than just something of "an idea."

But much of what politicians say about antifa isn't quite true. Here's what antifa is, what it isn't, and what you need to know.

Anti, anti, anti...

Antifa is not a highly organized movement, nor is it merely an idea. Antifa is a loose affiliation of local activists scattered across the United States and a few other countries.

The term "antifa" is short for antifascist; it's used both by its adherents and its foes.

In general, people who identify as antifa are known not for what they support, but what they oppose: Fascism, nationalism, far-right ideologies, white supremacy, authoritarianism, racism, homophobia and xenophobia. Some antifa activists also denounce capitalism and the government overall.

Mostly, people aligned with antifa are on the left of the political spectrum. Antifa is not, however, affiliated with Joe Biden, the Democratic Party or its leaders. Biden has condemned antifa and called violence "unacceptable."

Antifa actions have included everything from tracking and publicly identifying members of alt-right groups to physically attacking adversaries.
Antifa members and counter protesters gather during a right-wing No-To-Marxism rally on August 27, 2017 in Berkeley, California.&#xa0; / Credit: Amy Osborne / AFP/Getty Images
Antifa members and counter protesters gather during a right-wing No-To-Marxism rally on August 27, 2017 in Berkeley, California. / Credit: Amy Osborne / AFP/Getty Images

In "Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook," author Mark Bray, an organizer for the Occupy Wall Street movement, lays out antifa's methods this way:

"Despite the media portrayal of a deranged, bloodthirsty antifa… the vast majority of anti-fascist tactics involve no physical violence whatsoever. Anti-fascists conduct research on the far right online, in person, and sometimes through infiltrations; they dox them, push central milieux to disown them, pressure bosses to fire them…

"But it's also true that some of them punch Nazis in the face and don't apologize for it."

During public demonstrations, antifa activists often wear top-to-toe black; even before the coronavirus pandemic, they were also known for wearing face coverings at public gatherings.

Antifa has no official national leadership, though followers have organized themselves into small, local cells that sometimes coordinate with other movements, such as Black Lives Matter. Some self-described antifa adherents have organized to confront Patriot Prayer, the Proud Boys, and other far-right groups during public demonstrations. Some of those rallies have devolved into violence.

Some antifa adherents keep a very low profile, while other local groups venture to give themselves a more public profile with a name and a website. One of the oldest such groups appears to be Rose City Antifa, which says it was founded in Portland, Oregon, in 2007. According to its website, its main focus is "any work that prevents fascist organizing, and when that is not possible, provides consequences to fascist organizers. This is supported by researching and tracking fascist organizations."

Antifa in prime time

Over President Trump's years in office, coverage of "antifa" has skyrocketed in the mainstream press. That coverage started on the day of his inauguration, when dozens of people took to the streets of the nation's capital in a protest that would soon grow violent. Authorities would later arrest several dozen of them, many of whom later identified themselves as antifa, and accuse them of starting fires and riots. Charges were eventually dropped for the bulk of the defendants, while others were acquitted by juries.

President Trump pointed a finger at what he called the "alt-left" following the infamous "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia in 2017. After a white supremacist deliberately plowed his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing a woman named Heather Heyer, Mr. Trump sparked more outrage when he suggested an equivalency between the white supremacists and the protesters on the other side, who despite his claims were mostly peaceful.

Right-wing figures and other commentators on social media also have falsely accused unspecified antifa members of starting wildfires on the West Coast, prompting police and fire officials to appeal to the public to stop spreading what one agency called "an UNTRUE rumor."

Another common conspiracy theory has alleged, without evidence, that billionaire philanthropist George Soros is funding antifa.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/antifa-supporters-want-175921899.html
Leslie Gornstein br Fri, October 16, 2020, 11:59 A... (show quote)


Then why are all the riots and burning taking place where POTUS planned his economic recovery zones to be? You copy and paste pretty good but your brain is out to lunch. Wear your mask, lower your immunity, and obey the MSM. So the winter flu can almost kill you, and if you die, they'll call it CV-19. Just another stat an excuse to keep us locked down.

Reply
Oct 18, 2020 07:41:13   #
America 1
 
rumitoid wrote:
Leslie Gornstein
Fri, October 16, 2020, 11:59 AM MDT

Antifa has seen a steady increase in media attention ever since President Donald Trump was first inaugurated in January 2017. Republicans often portray antifa as a highly organized group of "terrorists" worthy of national watch lists.

Right-wing media blames antifa members for rioting and looting. Democrats have also condemned such violence, but many on the left say the rhetoric about antifa is greatly exaggerated, and that it's less of an organized movement than just something of "an idea."

But much of what politicians say about antifa isn't quite true. Here's what antifa is, what it isn't, and what you need to know.

Anti, anti, anti...

Antifa is not a highly organized movement, nor is it merely an idea. Antifa is a loose affiliation of local activists scattered across the United States and a few other countries.

The term "antifa" is short for antifascist; it's used both by its adherents and its foes.

In general, people who identify as antifa are known not for what they support, but what they oppose: Fascism, nationalism, far-right ideologies, white supremacy, authoritarianism, racism, homophobia and xenophobia. Some antifa activists also denounce capitalism and the government overall.

Mostly, people aligned with antifa are on the left of the political spectrum. Antifa is not, however, affiliated with Joe Biden, the Democratic Party or its leaders. Biden has condemned antifa and called violence "unacceptable."

Antifa actions have included everything from tracking and publicly identifying members of alt-right groups to physically attacking adversaries.

In "Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook," author Mark Bray, an organizer for the Occupy Wall Street movement, lays out antifa's methods this way:

"Despite the media portrayal of a deranged, bloodthirsty antifa… the vast majority of anti-fascist tactics involve no physical violence whatsoever. Anti-fascists conduct research on the far right online, in person, and sometimes through infiltrations; they dox them, push central milieux to disown them, pressure bosses to fire them…

"But it's also true that some of them punch Nazis in the face and don't apologize for it."

During public demonstrations, antifa activists often wear top-to-toe black; even before the coronavirus pandemic, they were also known for wearing face coverings at public gatherings.

Antifa has no official national leadership, though followers have organized themselves into small, local cells that sometimes coordinate with other movements, such as Black Lives Matter. Some self-described antifa adherents have organized to confront Patriot Prayer, the Proud Boys, and other far-right groups during public demonstrations. Some of those rallies have devolved into violence.

Some antifa adherents keep a very low profile, while other local groups venture to give themselves a more public profile with a name and a website. One of the oldest such groups appears to be Rose City Antifa, which says it was founded in Portland, Oregon, in 2007. According to its website, its main focus is "any work that prevents fascist organizing, and when that is not possible, provides consequences to fascist organizers. This is supported by researching and tracking fascist organizations."

Antifa in prime time

Over President Trump's years in office, coverage of "antifa" has skyrocketed in the mainstream press. That coverage started on the day of his inauguration, when dozens of people took to the streets of the nation's capital in a protest that would soon grow violent. Authorities would later arrest several dozen of them, many of whom later identified themselves as antifa, and accuse them of starting fires and riots. Charges were eventually dropped for the bulk of the defendants, while others were acquitted by juries.

President Trump pointed a finger at what he called the "alt-left" following the infamous "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia in 2017. After a white supremacist deliberately plowed his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing a woman named Heather Heyer, Mr. Trump sparked more outrage when he suggested an equivalency between the white supremacists and the protesters on the other side, who despite his claims were mostly peaceful.

"What about the alt-left that came charging at, what you say, the alt-right?" Mr. Trump wondered aloud. "Do they have any semblance of guilt? What about the fact they're charging with clubs in their hands, swinging clubs, do they have any problem? I think they do."

In the years since then, media coverage has identified antifa as participants, and sometimes agitators, in clashes at numerous rallies and protests around the country. That includes a 2017 anti-hate rally in Berkeley, California, and a Patriot Prayer "freedom rally" in Portland, Oregon, in 2018.

In at least one instance, a person self-identifying as an antifa supporter has been linked to a deadly attack at a protest. Michael Forest Reinoehl, 48, was considered a prime suspect in the August 2020 killing of 39-year-old Aaron "Jay" Danielson, a right-wing activist who was shot during heated demonstrations in Portland. Reinoehl was later shot to death by federal authorities as they moved to arrest him.

Reinoehl had described himself in a social media post as "100% ANTIFA."

The "T" word

In the summer of 2019, Republican Senators Ted Cruz and Bill Cassidy introduced a resolution calling for antifa to be labeled as a domestic terror organization. President Trump voiced his support on Twitter.

Major consideration is being given to naming ANTIFA an “ORGANIZATION OF TERROR.” Portland is being watched very closely. Hopefully the Mayor will be able to properly do his job!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 17, 2019

But the Trump administration's own Department of Homeland Security and FBI don't appear to view antifa as a leading threat. A DHS draft document from September 2020 reportedly named white supremacist groups as the biggest terror threat to America. That same document doesn't mention antifa at all.

The FBI also considers far-right groups the "top of the priority list." FBI director Christopher Wray said in February 2020 that the FBI places the risk of violence from racially-motivated extremist groups "on the same footing" as the threat posed by foreign terrorist organizations such as ISIS and its sympathizers.

That's not to say the FBI hasn't also taken aim at antifa. After arson and looting broke out amid the protests in Minneapolis following the death of George Floyd, Wray said: "We're seeing people who are exploiting this situation to pursue violent, extremist agendas — anarchists like ANTIFA, and other agitators. These individuals have set out to sow discord and upheaval, rather than join in the righteous pursuit of equality and justice."

But the idea of designating antifa a terror group worries some civil rights advocates.

"The designation would grant federal law enforcement broad powers, under the federal terrorism code, to surveil and investigate anyone labeled as antifa," the Southern Poverty Law Center said in a statement. "It could also allow federal law enforcement to broadly target anyone involved in protests viewed unfavorably by the Trump administration, even retroactively."

The center added, "President Trump's announcement is rooted in politics, not the present realities of the terror threat in the U.S."

False flags

Antifa has earned its reputation for sporadic violence. But many other rumors about antifa have been spun from whole cloth, sometimes by people later identified as right-wing extremists. In June 2020, Twitter shut down multiple fake antifa accounts that were inciting violence against white suburbs; subsequent investigations tracked the accounts to Identity Evropa, a white supremacist organization.

Leslie Gornstein
Fri, October 16, 2020, 11:59 AM MDT

Antifa has seen a steady increase in media attention ever since President Donald Trump was first inaugurated in January 2017. Republicans often portray antifa as a highly organized group of "terrorists" worthy of national watch lists.

Right-wing media blames antifa members for rioting and looting. Democrats have also condemned such violence, but many on the left say the rhetoric about antifa is greatly exaggerated, and that it's less of an organized movement than just something of "an idea."

But much of what politicians say about antifa isn't quite true. Here's what antifa is, what it isn't, and what you need to know.

Anti, anti, anti...

Antifa is not a highly organized movement, nor is it merely an idea. Antifa is a loose affiliation of local activists scattered across the United States and a few other countries.

The term "antifa" is short for antifascist; it's used both by its adherents and its foes.

In general, people who identify as antifa are known not for what they support, but what they oppose: Fascism, nationalism, far-right ideologies, white supremacy, authoritarianism, racism, homophobia and xenophobia. Some antifa activists also denounce capitalism and the government overall.

Mostly, people aligned with antifa are on the left of the political spectrum. Antifa is not, however, affiliated with Joe Biden, the Democratic Party or its leaders. Biden has condemned antifa and called violence "unacceptable."

Antifa actions have included everything from tracking and publicly identifying members of alt-right groups to physically attacking adversaries.
Antifa members and counter protesters gather during a right-wing No-To-Marxism rally on August 27, 2017 in Berkeley, California.&#xa0; / Credit: Amy Osborne / AFP/Getty Images
Antifa members and counter protesters gather during a right-wing No-To-Marxism rally on August 27, 2017 in Berkeley, California. / Credit: Amy Osborne / AFP/Getty Images

In "Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook," author Mark Bray, an organizer for the Occupy Wall Street movement, lays out antifa's methods this way:

"Despite the media portrayal of a deranged, bloodthirsty antifa… the vast majority of anti-fascist tactics involve no physical violence whatsoever. Anti-fascists conduct research on the far right online, in person, and sometimes through infiltrations; they dox them, push central milieux to disown them, pressure bosses to fire them…

"But it's also true that some of them punch Nazis in the face and don't apologize for it."

During public demonstrations, antifa activists often wear top-to-toe black; even before the coronavirus pandemic, they were also known for wearing face coverings at public gatherings.

Antifa has no official national leadership, though followers have organized themselves into small, local cells that sometimes coordinate with other movements, such as Black Lives Matter. Some self-described antifa adherents have organized to confront Patriot Prayer, the Proud Boys, and other far-right groups during public demonstrations. Some of those rallies have devolved into violence.

Some antifa adherents keep a very low profile, while other local groups venture to give themselves a more public profile with a name and a website. One of the oldest such groups appears to be Rose City Antifa, which says it was founded in Portland, Oregon, in 2007. According to its website, its main focus is "any work that prevents fascist organizing, and when that is not possible, provides consequences to fascist organizers. This is supported by researching and tracking fascist organizations."

Antifa in prime time

Over President Trump's years in office, coverage of "antifa" has skyrocketed in the mainstream press. That coverage started on the day of his inauguration, when dozens of people took to the streets of the nation's capital in a protest that would soon grow violent. Authorities would later arrest several dozen of them, many of whom later identified themselves as antifa, and accuse them of starting fires and riots. Charges were eventually dropped for the bulk of the defendants, while others were acquitted by juries.

President Trump pointed a finger at what he called the "alt-left" following the infamous "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia in 2017. After a white supremacist deliberately plowed his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing a woman named Heather Heyer, Mr. Trump sparked more outrage when he suggested an equivalency between the white supremacists and the protesters on the other side, who despite his claims were mostly peaceful.

Right-wing figures and other commentators on social media also have falsely accused unspecified antifa members of starting wildfires on the West Coast, prompting police and fire officials to appeal to the public to stop spreading what one agency called "an UNTRUE rumor."

Another common conspiracy theory has alleged, without evidence, that billionaire philanthropist George Soros is funding antifa.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/antifa-supporters-want-175921899.html
Leslie Gornstein br Fri, October 16, 2020, 11:59 A... (show quote)


Are you the high bid on that bridge in NYC?

Reply
Oct 18, 2020 10:25:59   #
P Lightfoot Loc: DEPLOYED ON STATION
 
Antifa Black lives matter are fascists and domestic terrorists and they will be taken out as soon as they leave the demonRAT city’s and there protection by the demonRAT party I have dared them to come to Florida but they are cowards
that hide in there sanctuary city’s and most of them don’t even vote and wouldn’t know how to vote there nothing but chicken shit cowards that have to outnumber there opposition antifa I dare you bring it to Florida SEMPER FI. USMC

Reply
Oct 18, 2020 13:10:18   #
TommyRadd Loc: Midwest USA
 
America 1 wrote:
Are you the high bid on that bridge in NYC?


It makes me wonder if people like he read Orwell’s 1984 and thought, “oh boy, I can’t wait! Won’t that be wonderful to have the government tell me what to think and say!”

It seems anyone who ventures past the MSM narrative and does some real research comes to major different conclusions than the Bill of goods being pushed on the masses.

The sad part is, I know he’s capable.

Reply
 
 
Oct 18, 2020 13:34:48   #
Alber
 
rumitoid: Answer to the writing by Leslie Gornstein that you publish without investigating yourself. Leslie Gornstein wrote: Antifa has seen a steady increase in media attention ever since President Donald Trump was first inaugurated in January 2017. Republicans often portray antifa as a highly organized group of "terrorists" worthy of national watch lists.
Right-wing media blames antifa members for rioting and looting. Democrats have also condemned such violence, but many on the left say the rhetoric about antifa is greatly exaggerated, and that it's less of an organized movement than just something of "an idea."
But much of what politicians say about antifa isn't quite true. Here's what antifa is, what it isn't, and what you need to know.
In general, people who identify as antifa are known not for what they support, but what they oppose: Fascism, nationalism, far-right ideologies, white supremacy, authoritarianism, racism, homophobia and xenophobia. Some antifa activists also denounce capitalism and the government overall.
Mostly, people aligned with antifa are on the left of the political spectrum. Antifa is not, however, affiliated with Joe Biden, the Democratic Party or its leaders. Biden has condemned antifa and called violence "unacceptable."
Antifa has no official national leadership, though followers have organized themselves into small, local cells that sometimes coordinate with other movements, such as Black Lives Matter. Some self-described antifa adherents have organized to confront Patriot Prayer, the Proud Boys, and other far-right groups during public demonstrations. Some of those rallies have devolved into violence.
Right-wing figures and other commentators on social media also have falsely accused unspecified antifa members of starting wildfires on the West Coast, prompting police and fire officials to appeal to the public to stop spreading what one agency called "an UNTRUE rumor."
Another common conspiracy theory has alleged, without evidence, that billionaire philanthropist George Soros is funding antifa.








Answer to Leslie Gornstein: The uncomfortable truth about Antifa. Whenever I write about Nazi-fascism I make a preamble to remember its affiliation, since there is a historical amnesia on this particular conveniently induced by its twin brother, Bolshevik communism, which seeks to erase the fact that they are both children of the same father: Marxism . ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Having clarified the above, it is necessary to recognize that the copyright on the term "anti-fascism" (now shortened to Antifa) belong exclusively to Stalinist communism and was developed as a double-edged sword; that is, with two purposes, one to commit fratricide, destroying its twin brother and the other, to destroy the enemies of Marxism using Nazi-fascism as a decoy. The foregoing seems contradictory, but it is not and has been demonstrated by historical reality. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The ideology of Antifa is based on the assumption that the Nazi party could never have come to power in Germany if people had fought it more aggressively on the streets in the 1920s and 1930s; and without a doubt, this assumption has no basis whatsoever, it is a deception, since antifascism, far from serving to prevent the Nazis from coming to power, helped them in their purposes. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- It is not something new that the term of fascist is applied to anyone who is not, because between 1924 and 1933, the Communists accused: socialists, republicans, liberals, democrats and conservatives of being fascists, helping to weaken the forces opposed to fascism, thus harming democracy. However, acting contrary to all this anti-fascist propaganda, the German communists encouraged by Stalin, brought Hitler to power in 1933 in the Weimar Republic, joining the communists with the national socialists (Nazis) in parliament and, the newspaper Pravda of Moscow in those years, praised Nazism, stating that Nazi behavior was more proletarian than that of the Social Democrats, which is why many communist militants joined the ranks of Nazism, with workerist slogans that were common to them, since both systems have their origin in Marxism.-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- History shows how using antifascism as a pretext democracy is destroyed, always for the sake of achieving a superior result, the implantation of Marxist communism. The International Communism applied the idea of a world divided between friends and enemies, so typical of totalitarian regimes, to identify any dissent or discrepancy with fascism. First, the social democrats, described as social fascists, were denounced and fought; and later the Trotskyists and anarchists, deserving of physical liquidation as collaborators of fascism .----------------------------- According to some politicians (Bernie Sanders, Alexandria Ocazio Cortés, etc.) as well as in the media dominated by the left (CNN, NYT, etc.), thugs who use violence to impose their opinions on others are popular heroes if their aggressions are committed in the name of "antifascism", although in them they show the same fanaticism, the same intolerance and the same aggressiveness as the fascists. In many countries, the left uses "anti-fascism" as an alibi to justify any aggression. For this, it is based on an argument as fallacious as it is dangerous: that against fascism everything must be allowed. But, who decides that this or that person is a fascist? Well, the extreme left itself. ------------------------------------------------------------------------
Most of the Antifa come from the anarchist movement or the extreme left, although here in the US, since the 2016 presidential elections, some people with more conventional political backgrounds have also joined their ranks.------------------------------------------------------------------ The President has recently stated that Antifa is a terrorist organization and intends to have it recognized as such, in order to combat it properly; but he faces criticism from his political adversaries, who claim that it is not possible to do so, citing multiple reasons. However, one of his fiercest adversaries, House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, in August 2017 condemned the "violent actions of people calling themselves Antifa", saying: "Our democracy has no place to incite violence or endanger the public, regardless of the ideology of those who commit such acts." "The violent actions of people calling themselves Antifa in Berkeley this weekend deserve unequivocal condemnation, and the perpetrators must be arrested and prosecuted". Of course, what Verdi wrote in the opera Rigoletto can be applied to this lady: "La donna è mobile - Qual piuma al vento - Muta d'accento - E di pensiero …" (The woman is mobile - Like a feather in the wind - Change accent - And thought). Perhaps she spoke without consulting and now she will change her speech, as in the case of the "plandemic", when she accused the President of Xenophobia for closing travels to and from China and went to Chinatown to give kisses and hugs; then afterwards going on to criticize that measures were not taken in time, to avoid the consequences of the "Chinese virus" (Joe Biden was silent, when he was summoned by the President in the debate to condemn Antifa).---------------------------------------------------------------- David Horowitz in his book "The Shadow Party" says: "The Democratic Party changed for many years. It began in the McGovern campaign, where he [Soros] found that the left during the 1960s was trying to set the country on fire and that is why it formed aggressive groups, Hispanic groups, all of them radical groups that gradually took control of the Democratic Party".----------- Horowitz also describes a strategy called "Up and Down" that Soros and his group have used. "Generate violence in the street and then have your own men go to fix it," he explained. “These violent people make anarchy look attractive; what can mean the death of innocent people and then Obama invites them (Antifa and BLM) to the White House, and Soros is funding both Obama and the criminals on the streets". ------------------- --------------------------------------------- Perhaps the most striking example One of this strategy that is used today is the far-left group Antifa, whose members are known to wear black and conceal their identity with masks on their faces. Although its name is an abbreviation for "antifascist," the organization often uses fascist tactics and resorts to violence against conservatives, supporters of President Donald Trump, and others they deem correct.-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- "The power the left has through such philanthropic foundations need to be controlled, "Horowitz emphasized." Left-wing foundations hide their donors and fund the entire Ruckus Society [a non-profit organization that claims to share a 'non-violent direct action' training] and all these people are creating chaos ".-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Hopefully something will be done to stop Antifa. History teaches us a lesson, antifascism was used to destroy democracy in the Germany of the Weimar Republic and bring the Nazis to power and not to prevent them from reaching it. ----------------------------------------------------------

Reply
Oct 18, 2020 13:45:16   #
jim_shipley
 
What they want is to help Soros destroy the Trump economy and the paycheck they get from George SOros and all the loot they can carry

Reply
Oct 18, 2020 13:47:30   #
tactful Loc: just North of the District of LMAO
 
steve66613 wrote:
And, Antifa is a bunch of cop killers!


And alt right has never hurt a fly in comparison .. think the lovely school shootings and other assorted shenanigans ending the same way?

How many of the others are verified like junk support is?

Reply
Oct 18, 2020 13:50:50   #
jim_shipley
 
Note at the vast majority of the shootings were done by liberal parasites like you.

Reply
 
 
Oct 18, 2020 14:12:40   #
4430 Loc: Little Egypt ** Southern Illinory
 
steve66613 wrote:
Could save a lot of blather......Antifa is violent, rioting, murdering, Biden voters!


Plus losers that can't stand to have lost now hoping to get Trump out of office so they can get on with their plan to destroy America and make it into their vision where they have all the power over the masses living in their mansions with money running out the noses and the masses living below third world countries now !

Reply
Oct 18, 2020 14:18:25   #
Michael Rich Loc: Lapine Oregon
 
tactful wrote:
And alt right has never hurt a fly in comparison .. think the lovely school shootings and other assorted shenanigans ending the same way?

How many of the others are verified like junk support is?


You are too drunk on your own pride to be cognizant.

And the dope you smoke is probably the only quality about you.

Reply
Oct 18, 2020 14:33:26   #
maureenthannon
 
Do you support the Antifa members who committed arson in Los Angeles, CA that were caught setting blazes?

Reply
Oct 18, 2020 15:30:41   #
77Reaganite Loc: Snellville Georgia
 
rumitoid wrote:
Leslie Gornstein
Fri, October 16, 2020, 11:59 AM MDT

Antifa has seen a steady increase in media attention ever since President Donald Trump was first inaugurated in January 2017. Republicans often portray antifa as a highly organized group of "terrorists" worthy of national watch lists.

Right-wing media blames antifa members for rioting and looting. Democrats have also condemned such violence, but many on the left say the rhetoric about antifa is greatly exaggerated, and that it's less of an organized movement than just something of "an idea."

But much of what politicians say about antifa isn't quite true. Here's what antifa is, what it isn't, and what you need to know.

Anti, anti, anti...

Antifa is not a highly organized movement, nor is it merely an idea. Antifa is a loose affiliation of local activists scattered across the United States and a few other countries.

The term "antifa" is short for antifascist; it's used both by its adherents and its foes.

In general, people who identify as antifa are known not for what they support, but what they oppose: Fascism, nationalism, far-right ideologies, white supremacy, authoritarianism, racism, homophobia and xenophobia. Some antifa activists also denounce capitalism and the government overall.

Mostly, people aligned with antifa are on the left of the political spectrum. Antifa is not, however, affiliated with Joe Biden, the Democratic Party or its leaders. Biden has condemned antifa and called violence "unacceptable."

Antifa actions have included everything from tracking and publicly identifying members of alt-right groups to physically attacking adversaries.

In "Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook," author Mark Bray, an organizer for the Occupy Wall Street movement, lays out antifa's methods this way:

"Despite the media portrayal of a deranged, bloodthirsty antifa… the vast majority of anti-fascist tactics involve no physical violence whatsoever. Anti-fascists conduct research on the far right online, in person, and sometimes through infiltrations; they dox them, push central milieux to disown them, pressure bosses to fire them…

"But it's also true that some of them punch Nazis in the face and don't apologize for it."

During public demonstrations, antifa activists often wear top-to-toe black; even before the coronavirus pandemic, they were also known for wearing face coverings at public gatherings.

Antifa has no official national leadership, though followers have organized themselves into small, local cells that sometimes coordinate with other movements, such as Black Lives Matter. Some self-described antifa adherents have organized to confront Patriot Prayer, the Proud Boys, and other far-right groups during public demonstrations. Some of those rallies have devolved into violence.

Some antifa adherents keep a very low profile, while other local groups venture to give themselves a more public profile with a name and a website. One of the oldest such groups appears to be Rose City Antifa, which says it was founded in Portland, Oregon, in 2007. According to its website, its main focus is "any work that prevents fascist organizing, and when that is not possible, provides consequences to fascist organizers. This is supported by researching and tracking fascist organizations."

Antifa in prime time

Over President Trump's years in office, coverage of "antifa" has skyrocketed in the mainstream press. That coverage started on the day of his inauguration, when dozens of people took to the streets of the nation's capital in a protest that would soon grow violent. Authorities would later arrest several dozen of them, many of whom later identified themselves as antifa, and accuse them of starting fires and riots. Charges were eventually dropped for the bulk of the defendants, while others were acquitted by juries.

President Trump pointed a finger at what he called the "alt-left" following the infamous "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia in 2017. After a white supremacist deliberately plowed his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing a woman named Heather Heyer, Mr. Trump sparked more outrage when he suggested an equivalency between the white supremacists and the protesters on the other side, who despite his claims were mostly peaceful.

"What about the alt-left that came charging at, what you say, the alt-right?" Mr. Trump wondered aloud. "Do they have any semblance of guilt? What about the fact they're charging with clubs in their hands, swinging clubs, do they have any problem? I think they do."

In the years since then, media coverage has identified antifa as participants, and sometimes agitators, in clashes at numerous rallies and protests around the country. That includes a 2017 anti-hate rally in Berkeley, California, and a Patriot Prayer "freedom rally" in Portland, Oregon, in 2018.

In at least one instance, a person self-identifying as an antifa supporter has been linked to a deadly attack at a protest. Michael Forest Reinoehl, 48, was considered a prime suspect in the August 2020 killing of 39-year-old Aaron "Jay" Danielson, a right-wing activist who was shot during heated demonstrations in Portland. Reinoehl was later shot to death by federal authorities as they moved to arrest him.

Reinoehl had described himself in a social media post as "100% ANTIFA."

The "T" word

In the summer of 2019, Republican Senators Ted Cruz and Bill Cassidy introduced a resolution calling for antifa to be labeled as a domestic terror organization. President Trump voiced his support on Twitter.

Major consideration is being given to naming ANTIFA an “ORGANIZATION OF TERROR.” Portland is being watched very closely. Hopefully the Mayor will be able to properly do his job!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 17, 2019

But the Trump administration's own Department of Homeland Security and FBI don't appear to view antifa as a leading threat. A DHS draft document from September 2020 reportedly named white supremacist groups as the biggest terror threat to America. That same document doesn't mention antifa at all.

The FBI also considers far-right groups the "top of the priority list." FBI director Christopher Wray said in February 2020 that the FBI places the risk of violence from racially-motivated extremist groups "on the same footing" as the threat posed by foreign terrorist organizations such as ISIS and its sympathizers.

That's not to say the FBI hasn't also taken aim at antifa. After arson and looting broke out amid the protests in Minneapolis following the death of George Floyd, Wray said: "We're seeing people who are exploiting this situation to pursue violent, extremist agendas — anarchists like ANTIFA, and other agitators. These individuals have set out to sow discord and upheaval, rather than join in the righteous pursuit of equality and justice."

But the idea of designating antifa a terror group worries some civil rights advocates.

"The designation would grant federal law enforcement broad powers, under the federal terrorism code, to surveil and investigate anyone labeled as antifa," the Southern Poverty Law Center said in a statement. "It could also allow federal law enforcement to broadly target anyone involved in protests viewed unfavorably by the Trump administration, even retroactively."

The center added, "President Trump's announcement is rooted in politics, not the present realities of the terror threat in the U.S."

False flags

Antifa has earned its reputation for sporadic violence. But many other rumors about antifa have been spun from whole cloth, sometimes by people later identified as right-wing extremists. In June 2020, Twitter shut down multiple fake antifa accounts that were inciting violence against white suburbs; subsequent investigations tracked the accounts to Identity Evropa, a white supremacist organization.

Leslie Gornstein
Fri, October 16, 2020, 11:59 AM MDT

Antifa has seen a steady increase in media attention ever since President Donald Trump was first inaugurated in January 2017. Republicans often portray antifa as a highly organized group of "terrorists" worthy of national watch lists.

Right-wing media blames antifa members for rioting and looting. Democrats have also condemned such violence, but many on the left say the rhetoric about antifa is greatly exaggerated, and that it's less of an organized movement than just something of "an idea."

But much of what politicians say about antifa isn't quite true. Here's what antifa is, what it isn't, and what you need to know.

Anti, anti, anti...

Antifa is not a highly organized movement, nor is it merely an idea. Antifa is a loose affiliation of local activists scattered across the United States and a few other countries.

The term "antifa" is short for antifascist; it's used both by its adherents and its foes.

In general, people who identify as antifa are known not for what they support, but what they oppose: Fascism, nationalism, far-right ideologies, white supremacy, authoritarianism, racism, homophobia and xenophobia. Some antifa activists also denounce capitalism and the government overall.

Mostly, people aligned with antifa are on the left of the political spectrum. Antifa is not, however, affiliated with Joe Biden, the Democratic Party or its leaders. Biden has condemned antifa and called violence "unacceptable."

Antifa actions have included everything from tracking and publicly identifying members of alt-right groups to physically attacking adversaries.
Antifa members and counter protesters gather during a right-wing No-To-Marxism rally on August 27, 2017 in Berkeley, California.&#xa0; / Credit: Amy Osborne / AFP/Getty Images
Antifa members and counter protesters gather during a right-wing No-To-Marxism rally on August 27, 2017 in Berkeley, California. / Credit: Amy Osborne / AFP/Getty Images

In "Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook," author Mark Bray, an organizer for the Occupy Wall Street movement, lays out antifa's methods this way:

"Despite the media portrayal of a deranged, bloodthirsty antifa… the vast majority of anti-fascist tactics involve no physical violence whatsoever. Anti-fascists conduct research on the far right online, in person, and sometimes through infiltrations; they dox them, push central milieux to disown them, pressure bosses to fire them…

"But it's also true that some of them punch Nazis in the face and don't apologize for it."

During public demonstrations, antifa activists often wear top-to-toe black; even before the coronavirus pandemic, they were also known for wearing face coverings at public gatherings.

Antifa has no official national leadership, though followers have organized themselves into small, local cells that sometimes coordinate with other movements, such as Black Lives Matter. Some self-described antifa adherents have organized to confront Patriot Prayer, the Proud Boys, and other far-right groups during public demonstrations. Some of those rallies have devolved into violence.

Some antifa adherents keep a very low profile, while other local groups venture to give themselves a more public profile with a name and a website. One of the oldest such groups appears to be Rose City Antifa, which says it was founded in Portland, Oregon, in 2007. According to its website, its main focus is "any work that prevents fascist organizing, and when that is not possible, provides consequences to fascist organizers. This is supported by researching and tracking fascist organizations."

Antifa in prime time

Over President Trump's years in office, coverage of "antifa" has skyrocketed in the mainstream press. That coverage started on the day of his inauguration, when dozens of people took to the streets of the nation's capital in a protest that would soon grow violent. Authorities would later arrest several dozen of them, many of whom later identified themselves as antifa, and accuse them of starting fires and riots. Charges were eventually dropped for the bulk of the defendants, while others were acquitted by juries.

President Trump pointed a finger at what he called the "alt-left" following the infamous "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia in 2017. After a white supremacist deliberately plowed his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing a woman named Heather Heyer, Mr. Trump sparked more outrage when he suggested an equivalency between the white supremacists and the protesters on the other side, who despite his claims were mostly peaceful.

Right-wing figures and other commentators on social media also have falsely accused unspecified antifa members of starting wildfires on the West Coast, prompting police and fire officials to appeal to the public to stop spreading what one agency called "an UNTRUE rumor."

Another common conspiracy theory has alleged, without evidence, that billionaire philanthropist George Soros is funding antifa.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/antifa-supporters-want-175921899.html
Leslie Gornstein br Fri, October 16, 2020, 11:59 A... (show quote)


There is no alleged George Soros is funding these people is 501 c 3 S and is 501c for's are funding these protesters! They want to burn down the system and start it completely over because that's been the Democrats goal for the last 40 years was to do away with the Constitution so we can be under their constant rule 24/7 they'll be our overlords but that's not happening sir because we have three branches of government and we're going to keep those three branches of government! And we're not going to sell out to mob rule! that's not how America set up because most of the Americans in this country who want antifa dealt with! That's why I'm finally glad they're throwing the RICO Act at these folks the same way they brought down the mob is the same way they're going to bring down antifa once we know how their power structure works then we work on their funding structure and that's where mr. Soros his name is already been provided by all the people that AR getting arrested! the Democrats work for George Soros and the Chinese Communist Party there's no secret that the Chinese Communist party has been funding the Democratic Party going on for two decades now since they've been on the World Trade Organization and the clintons gave the Chinese our launch codes back in 1994 so yes the Democratic party has a history of dealing with the Chinese communists! Every last one of these Democrats are beholding to George Soros and the Chinese Communist Party! the Chinese 100% own California Hollywood and Academia as a whole! Critical race Theory wasn't written by a liberal Professor it was written by the Chinese Communist Party! Checkmates game-set-match there rheumatoid!

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