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Linda Ronstadt: "In My Mind, I Can Still Sing"
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Sep 4, 2019 14:58:33   #
slatten49 (a regular here)
 
https://www.msn.com/en-us/music/celebrity/linda-ronstadt-on-life-after-parkinsons-stole-her-singing-voice-in-my-mind-i-can-still-sing/ar-AAGO7V5?ocid=spartandhp

Linda Ronstadt on Life After Parkinson’s Stole Her Singing Voice: 'In My Mind, I Can Still Sing'

Linda Ronstadt‘s voice put her on top of the music charts for decades and won her 10 Grammys — but her career came to a devastating end when Parkinson’s disease robbed her of her singing voice.

“It’s like not having a leg or an arm, but there’s nothing I can do about it,” the “Long Long Time” singer, 73, explains in an exclusive interview with PEOPLE, featured in this week’s issue. (A documentary about her impressive career, Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice, will premiere in theaters on Friday.)

Ronstadt was officially diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2013, but she lost her singing voice four years earlier.

“It felt like something was wrong, but I couldn’t tell what it was,” she says, describing the initial symptoms. “First, I thought it was my headphone mix, then I thought it was the microphone, then I thought some frequencies were just missing from my voice. It got slowly, steadily worse.”

Ronstadt struggled to make two albums as her voice worsened. The mother of two was initially told it was “nerves,” before she was diagnosed by a neurologist.

Filled with sadness, Ronstadt adjusted slowly to the loss of her instrument. In time, her mobility declined as well.

“There’s nothing I can do and I just learned how to live with it,” she says. These days, the rock icon can’t walk far and has severe back pain that keeps her mostly at home.

“I can’t sit up in a theater and it’s hard to go to a movie or an opera,” Ronstadt says. “I try to get out, but it’s about once a year.”

In one of her less “graceful” moments, Ronstadt recalls falling just before she was supposed to present friend Dolly Parton with her MusiCares award back in February.

“Unfortunately, [Dolly] didn’t realize how disabled I was, and she came and gave me a big hug,” Ronstadt recalls. “I said, ‘Dolly, you’re going to knock me down.’ She thought I was kidding.”

Unbalanced by the hug, Ronstadt started to fall and grabbed onto the pedestal holding Parton’s award. The trophy, which was made of glass, fell to the floor and broke into pieces.

“Dolly was a good sport about it,” Ronstadt tells PEOPLE. “She said she took the pieces home.”

Though Ronstadt can no longer sing and struggles to get around, she hasn’t lost complete connection to the talent that has guided her life since she was a teenager.

Says Ronstadt, “In my mind — in my imagination — I can still sing.”

| Reply
Sep 4, 2019 15:19:36   #
lpnmajor (a regular here)
 
slatten49 wrote:
https://www.msn.com/en-us/music/celebrity/linda-ronstadt-on-life-after-parkinsons-stole-her-singing-voice-in-my-mind-i-can-still-sing/ar-AAGO7V5?ocid=spartandhp

Linda Ronstadt on Life After Parkinson’s Stole Her Singing Voice: 'In My Mind, I Can Still Sing'

Kim Hubbard

Linda Ronstadt‘s voice put her on top of the music charts for decades and won her 10 Grammys — but her career came to a devastating end when Parkinson’s disease robbed her of her singing voice.

“It’s like not having a leg or an arm, but there’s nothing I can do about it,” the “Long Long Time” singer, 73, explains in an exclusive interview with PEOPLE, featured in this week’s issue. (A documentary about her impressive career, Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice, will premiere in theaters on Friday.)

Ronstadt was officially diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2013, but she lost her singing voice four years earlier.

“It felt like something was wrong, but I couldn’t tell what it was,” she says, describing the initial symptoms. “First, I thought it was my headphone mix, then I thought it was the microphone, then I thought some frequencies were just missing from my voice. It got slowly, steadily worse.”

Ronstadt struggled to make two albums as her voice worsened. The mother of two was initially told it was “nerves,” before she was diagnosed by a neurologist.

Filled with sadness, Ronstadt adjusted slowly to the loss of her instrument. In time, her mobility declined as well.

“There’s nothing I can do and I just learned how to live with it,” she says. These days, the rock icon can’t walk far and has severe back pain that keeps her mostly at home.

“I can’t sit up in a theater and it’s hard to go to a movie or an opera,” Ronstadt says. “I try to get out, but it’s about once a year.”

In one of her less “graceful” moments, Ronstadt recalls falling just before she was supposed to present friend Dolly Parton with her MusiCares award back in February.

“Unfortunately, [Dolly] didn’t realize how disabled I was, and she came and gave me a big hug,” Ronstadt recalls. “I said, ‘Dolly, you’re going to knock me down.’ She thought I was kidding.”

Unbalanced by the hug, Ronstadt started to fall and grabbed onto the pedestal holding Parton’s award. The trophy, which was made of glass, fell to the floor and broke into pieces.

“Dolly was a good sport about it,” Ronstadt tells PEOPLE. “She said she took the pieces home.”

Though Ronstadt can no longer sing and struggles to get around, she hasn’t lost complete connection to the talent that has guided her life since she was a teenager.

Says Ronstadt, “In my mind — in my imagination — I can still sing.”
https://www.msn.com/en-us/music/celebrity/linda-ro... (show quote)


I know the feeling. In my mind, I'm still young and handsome.

| Reply
Sep 4, 2019 15:25:08   #
slatten49 (a regular here)
 
lpnmajor wrote:
I know the feeling. In my mind, I'm still young and handsome.

Like you, Doc, I also have a vivid imagination.

I also was/remain a big fan of Linda Ronstadt.

| Reply
Sep 4, 2019 15:42:33   #
JustMPat (a regular here)
 
I, too, am a fan of Linda Ronstadt and Dolly Parton.



| Reply
Sep 4, 2019 15:44:14   #
lpnmajor (a regular here)
 
slatten49 wrote:
Like you, Doc, I also have a vivid imagination.

I also was/remain a big fan of Linda Ronstadt.


I live in my head 24/7..........................there's plenty of room.

| Reply
Sep 4, 2019 16:42:15   #
EN Submarine Qualified
 
JustMPat wrote:
I, too, am a fan of Linda Ronstadt and Dolly Parton.




Had the pleasure of attending a Dolly Parton performance in Green Bay years ago. Wonderful show.

| Reply
Sep 4, 2019 16:51:47   #
Carol Kelly (a regular here)
 
lpnmajor wrote:
I know the feeling. In my mind, I'm still young and handsome.


I think we may all have that disease.

| Reply
Sep 4, 2019 17:17:44   #
Y360AZ
 
EN Submarine Qualified wrote:
Had the pleasure of attending a Dolly Parton performance in Green Bay years ago. Wonderful show.


I saw her at the Grand Ole Opry when her name was not even on the program. I had not heard of her and I thought she was a good lookin' young gal with a pretty good voice so wrote her name in the program with a question mark because I wasn't sure how to spell her name. I was reminded of that several years ago when I came across the program – not remembering I had kept the program. It is now one of my prized souvenirs. Little did know how much I'd see/hear about her in the future.

| Reply
Sep 4, 2019 17:21:15   #
peg w
 
My heart broke when i found out Linda had Parkensons disease.i lobed her to death.

| Reply
Sep 4, 2019 17:36:03   #
maximus
 
lpnmajor wrote:
I know the feeling. In my mind, I'm still young and handsome.




Me too...but when I was young and handsome, I didn't even know it!


| Reply
Sep 4, 2019 17:47:17   #
debeda (a regular here)
 
slatten49 wrote:
https://www.msn.com/en-us/music/celebrity/linda-ronstadt-on-life-after-parkinsons-stole-her-singing-voice-in-my-mind-i-can-still-sing/ar-AAGO7V5?ocid=spartandhp

Linda Ronstadt on Life After Parkinson’s Stole Her Singing Voice: 'In My Mind, I Can Still Sing'

Linda Ronstadt‘s voice put her on top of the music charts for decades and won her 10 Grammys — but her career came to a devastating end when Parkinson’s disease robbed her of her singing voice.

“It’s like not having a leg or an arm, but there’s nothing I can do about it,” the “Long Long Time” singer, 73, explains in an exclusive interview with PEOPLE, featured in this week’s issue. (A documentary about her impressive career, Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice, will premiere in theaters on Friday.)

Ronstadt was officially diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2013, but she lost her singing voice four years earlier.

“It felt like something was wrong, but I couldn’t tell what it was,” she says, describing the initial symptoms. “First, I thought it was my headphone mix, then I thought it was the microphone, then I thought some frequencies were just missing from my voice. It got slowly, steadily worse.”

Ronstadt struggled to make two albums as her voice worsened. The mother of two was initially told it was “nerves,” before she was diagnosed by a neurologist.

Filled with sadness, Ronstadt adjusted slowly to the loss of her instrument. In time, her mobility declined as well.

“There’s nothing I can do and I just learned how to live with it,” she says. These days, the rock icon can’t walk far and has severe back pain that keeps her mostly at home.

“I can’t sit up in a theater and it’s hard to go to a movie or an opera,” Ronstadt says. “I try to get out, but it’s about once a year.”

In one of her less “graceful” moments, Ronstadt recalls falling just before she was supposed to present friend Dolly Parton with her MusiCares award back in February.

“Unfortunately, [Dolly] didn’t realize how disabled I was, and she came and gave me a big hug,” Ronstadt recalls. “I said, ‘Dolly, you’re going to knock me down.’ She thought I was kidding.”

Unbalanced by the hug, Ronstadt started to fall and grabbed onto the pedestal holding Parton’s award. The trophy, which was made of glass, fell to the floor and broke into pieces.

“Dolly was a good sport about it,” Ronstadt tells PEOPLE. “She said she took the pieces home.”

Though Ronstadt can no longer sing and struggles to get around, she hasn’t lost complete connection to the talent that has guided her life since she was a teenager.

Says Ronstadt, “In my mind — in my imagination — I can still sing.”
https://www.msn.com/en-us/music/celebrity/linda-ro... (show quote)


So, so sad

| Reply
Sep 4, 2019 17:47:47   #
debeda (a regular here)
 
lpnmajor wrote:
I live in my head 24/7..........................there's plenty of room.


Lolololhahahaha

| Reply
Sep 4, 2019 17:49:40   #
debeda (a regular here)
 
maximus wrote:
Me too...but when I was young and handsome, I didn't even know it!



And that's the saddest part!! For most of us (with the exception of Slatten ) we actually DON'T know what we've got till its gone

| Reply
Sep 4, 2019 18:54:08   #
slatten49 (a regular here)
 
debeda wrote:
And that's the saddest part!! For most of us (with the exception of Slatten ) we actually DON'T know what we've got till its gone


"I am a innocent man, oh yes I am...an innocent man." [quote/Billy Joel]

| Reply
Sep 4, 2019 19:02:07   #
debeda (a regular here)
 
slatten49 wrote:
"I am a innocent man, oh yes I am...an innocent man." [quote/Billy Joel]


Lolololhahahaha

| Reply
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