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The Gray Ghost
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Aug 11, 2019 16:06:13   #
dtucker300 (a regular here)
 
Foundation for Applied Conservative Leadership


You may be familiar with the historical figure John Singleton Mosby, who was nicknamed the "Gray Ghost."

Mosby was a Confederate cavalry battalion commander during "The War of Northern Aggression," or for those not as astute in American history, The Civil War.

Mosby's command, the 43rd Battalion, 1st Virginia Cavalry, was a partisan ranger unit famous for their lightning-fast raids and ability to elude Unionist pursuers, seemingly disappearing amongst the local farmers and townsmen.

One of Mosby's famous exploits became known as the "Berryville Wagon Train Raid" (August 13, 1864). Mosby, with a force of 350 men, captured a Federal 525-wagon train attached to General Phil Sheridan's Army of the Shenandoah. They overcame a guard of three Union infantry regiments and a cavalry regiment -- well over 2,000 men. Mosby rode off with hundreds of prisoners, close to 600 mules and horses, several hundred heads of cattle, and Sheridan's remaining wagons in flames.

Colonel Mosby operated with impunity, and his theatre of operations in Northern Virginia became known during the war and ever since as Mosby's Confederacy.

Well after the war, Mosby, now a much older man living in southern California, took a shine to a young lad living on a nearby ranch.

The youngster grew up and had an insatiable thirst for hearing tales of daring raids and stunning cavalry attacks from the Gray Ghost himself.

Astride their horses, Colonel Mosby and the youngster would mentally recreate the fights of the "late unpleasantness."

Tactical sparring games evolved, with Mosby playing himself while the youngster would play the part of General Robert E. Lee. Together, they would ride for hours, playing out situations on how they would strategically use the lay-of-the-land.

Who was this lad who benefited from the first-hand accounts and horseback reenactments by one of the greatest guerilla fighters of all time?

It was someone who would serve his country and be seriously wounded in World War I, then go on to become a pivotal military figure in World War II: George S. Patton.

General Patton's bold, no-holds-barred combat style reflected his understanding that tanks were essentially the cavalry of twentieth-century warfare. His aggressive command style reflected itself in the development of a fighting force that proved to be a deciding element in the Allies' victory in Europe.

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Aug 11, 2019 16:17:33   #
Noraa
 
dtucker300 wrote:
Foundation for Applied Conservative Leadership


You may be familiar with the historical figure John Singleton Mosby, who was nicknamed the "Gray Ghost."

Mosby was a Confederate cavalry battalion commander during "The War of Northern Aggression," or for those not as astute in American history, The Civil War.

Mosby's command, the 43rd Battalion, 1st Virginia Cavalry, was a partisan ranger unit famous for their lightning-fast raids and ability to elude Unionist pursuers, seemingly disappearing amongst the local farmers and townsmen.

One of Mosby's famous exploits became known as the "Berryville Wagon Train Raid" (August 13, 1864). Mosby, with a force of 350 men, captured a Federal 525-wagon train attached to General Phil Sheridan's Army of the Shenandoah. They overcame a guard of three Union infantry regiments and a cavalry regiment -- well over 2,000 men. Mosby rode off with hundreds of prisoners, close to 600 mules and horses, several hundred heads of cattle, and Sheridan's remaining wagons in flames.

Colonel Mosby operated with impunity, and his theatre of operations in Northern Virginia became known during the war and ever since as Mosby's Confederacy.

Well after the war, Mosby, now a much older man living in southern California, took a shine to a young lad living on a nearby ranch.

The youngster grew up and had an insatiable thirst for hearing tales of daring raids and stunning cavalry attacks from the Gray Ghost himself.

Astride their horses, Colonel Mosby and the youngster would mentally recreate the fights of the "late unpleasantness."

Tactical sparring games evolved, with Mosby playing himself while the youngster would play the part of General Robert E. Lee. Together, they would ride for hours, playing out situations on how they would strategically use the lay-of-the-land.

Who was this lad who benefited from the first-hand accounts and horseback reenactments by one of the greatest guerilla fighters of all time?

It was someone who would serve his country and be seriously wounded in World War I, then go on to become a pivotal military figure in World War II: George S. Patton.

General Patton's bold, no-holds-barred combat style reflected his understanding that tanks were essentially the cavalry of twentieth-century warfare. His aggressive command style reflected itself in the development of a fighting force that proved to be a deciding element in the Allies' victory in Europe.
Foundation for Applied Conservative Leadership br ... (show quote)


I knew of the Gray Ghost but had no idea about Patton knowing him. Thanks for the history lesson!

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Aug 11, 2019 16:27:08   #
slatten49 (a regular here)
 
dtucker300 wrote:
Foundation for Applied Conservative Leadership


You may be familiar with the historical figure John Singleton Mosby, who was nicknamed the "Gray Ghost."

Mosby was a Confederate cavalry battalion commander during "The War of Northern Aggression," or for those not as astute in American history, The Civil War.

Mosby's command, the 43rd Battalion, 1st Virginia Cavalry, was a partisan ranger unit famous for their lightning-fast raids and ability to elude Unionist pursuers, seemingly disappearing amongst the local farmers and townsmen.

One of Mosby's famous exploits became known as the "Berryville Wagon Train Raid" (August 13, 1864). Mosby, with a force of 350 men, captured a Federal 525-wagon train attached to General Phil Sheridan's Army of the Shenandoah. They overcame a guard of three Union infantry regiments and a cavalry regiment -- well over 2,000 men. Mosby rode off with hundreds of prisoners, close to 600 mules and horses, several hundred heads of cattle, and Sheridan's remaining wagons in flames.

Colonel Mosby operated with impunity, and his theatre of operations in Northern Virginia became known during the war and ever since as Mosby's Confederacy.

Well after the war, Mosby, now a much older man living in southern California, took a shine to a young lad living on a nearby ranch.

The youngster grew up and had an insatiable thirst for hearing tales of daring raids and stunning cavalry attacks from the Gray Ghost himself.

Astride their horses, Colonel Mosby and the youngster would mentally recreate the fights of the "late unpleasantness."

Tactical sparring games evolved, with Mosby playing himself while the youngster would play the part of General Robert E. Lee. Together, they would ride for hours, playing out situations on how they would strategically use the lay-of-the-land.

Who was this lad who benefited from the first-hand accounts and horseback reenactments by one of the greatest guerilla fighters of all time?

It was someone who would serve his country and be seriously wounded in World War I, then go on to become a pivotal military figure in World War II: George S. Patton.

General Patton's bold, no-holds-barred combat style reflected his understanding that tanks were essentially the cavalry of twentieth-century warfare. His aggressive command style reflected itself in the development of a fighting force that proved to be a deciding element in the Allies' victory in Europe.
Foundation for Applied Conservative Leadership br ... (show quote)

I love history, and The Civil War/War Between The States is among my favorite periods of not only U.S., but world history. I vaguely recall 'The Grey Ghost' and the many affiliated stories of his legacy. I will admit to not recalling George S. Patton's early relationship with the former confederate commander.

However, I always thought the term "The War of Northern Aggression" was amusing, more than anything. I'm a Texan/Southerner, so can speak to thoughts on the subject. Like it or not, scream states' rights or not, the crux of the conflict always comes back to slavery. One of the problems leading to the war was that many in Congress were principal slaveholders.

But, thanks, Tuck, for the interesting historical info.

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Aug 11, 2019 17:01:45   #
slatten49 (a regular here)
 
While wondering how I had 'vague' memories of Mosby, I took the liberty of looking him up. I found that there was a TV series titled 'The Gray Ghost' during the 1957-'58 TV year. Most likely, I watched it.

From the internet, "The Civil War exploits of Confederate cavalry officer John Singleton Mosby, nicknamed the Gray Ghost, was the basis of this syndicated series. Sgt. Magruder was the only other regular character but actual historic people were occasionally portrayed."

I was reminded that the musical theme song of the series was 'The Yellow Rose of Texas.'

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Aug 11, 2019 17:25:59   #
dtucker300 (a regular here)
 
slatten49 wrote:
While wondering how I had 'vague' memories of Mosby, I took the liberty of looking him up. I found that there was a TV series titled 'The Gray Ghost' during the 1957-'58 TV year. Most likely, I watched it.

From the internet, "The Civil War exploits of Confederate cavalry officer John Singleton Mosby, nicknamed the Gray Ghost, was the basis of this syndicated series. Sgt. Magruder was the only other regular character but actual historic people were occasionally portrayed."

I was reminded that the musical theme song of the series was 'The Yellow Rose of Texas.'
While wondering how I had 'vague' memories of Mosb... (show quote)


I vaguely remember the television show as a kid (I was in First Grade) but have never seen reruns of the program. I don't even know if they still exist.

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Aug 11, 2019 18:01:54   #
Noraa
 
dtucker300 wrote:
I vaguely remember the television show as a kid (I was in First Grade) but have never seen reruns of the program. I don't even know if they still exist.


Probably considered too racist now.

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Aug 11, 2019 18:07:42   #
slatten49 (a regular here)
 
dtucker300 wrote:
I vaguely remember the television show as a kid (I was in First Grade) but have never seen reruns of the program. I don't even know if they still exist.

Google 'The Gray Ghost', TV series. I believe they present videos of scenes, if not episodes of the program.

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Aug 12, 2019 11:05:36   #
bahmer (a regular here)
 
dtucker300 wrote:
Foundation for Applied Conservative Leadership


You may be familiar with the historical figure John Singleton Mosby, who was nicknamed the "Gray Ghost."

Mosby was a Confederate cavalry battalion commander during "The War of Northern Aggression," or for those not as astute in American history, The Civil War.

Mosby's command, the 43rd Battalion, 1st Virginia Cavalry, was a partisan ranger unit famous for their lightning-fast raids and ability to elude Unionist pursuers, seemingly disappearing amongst the local farmers and townsmen.

One of Mosby's famous exploits became known as the "Berryville Wagon Train Raid" (August 13, 1864). Mosby, with a force of 350 men, captured a Federal 525-wagon train attached to General Phil Sheridan's Army of the Shenandoah. They overcame a guard of three Union infantry regiments and a cavalry regiment -- well over 2,000 men. Mosby rode off with hundreds of prisoners, close to 600 mules and horses, several hundred heads of cattle, and Sheridan's remaining wagons in flames.

Colonel Mosby operated with impunity, and his theatre of operations in Northern Virginia became known during the war and ever since as Mosby's Confederacy.

Well after the war, Mosby, now a much older man living in southern California, took a shine to a young lad living on a nearby ranch.

The youngster grew up and had an insatiable thirst for hearing tales of daring raids and stunning cavalry attacks from the Gray Ghost himself.

Astride their horses, Colonel Mosby and the youngster would mentally recreate the fights of the "late unpleasantness."

Tactical sparring games evolved, with Mosby playing himself while the youngster would play the part of General Robert E. Lee. Together, they would ride for hours, playing out situations on how they would strategically use the lay-of-the-land.

Who was this lad who benefited from the first-hand accounts and horseback reenactments by one of the greatest guerilla fighters of all time?

It was someone who would serve his country and be seriously wounded in World War I, then go on to become a pivotal military figure in World War II: George S. Patton.

General Patton's bold, no-holds-barred combat style reflected his understanding that tanks were essentially the cavalry of twentieth-century warfare. His aggressive command style reflected itself in the development of a fighting force that proved to be a deciding element in the Allies' victory in Europe.
Foundation for Applied Conservative Leadership br ... (show quote)


Very interesting you learn something new every day.

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Aug 13, 2019 08:47:06   #
deltareb
 
I remember the TV show well. My brother wouldn't let us miss it. Probably cannot show reruns today because it might "offend" some worthless Mama's boy.

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