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Michael Brown questions having special month for people based on their sexual desires
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Jun 11, 2019 08:56:20   #
no propaganda please (a regular here)
 
LGBTQI ETC.
Why I do not celebrate 'gay pride'
Michael Brown questions having special month for people based on their sexual desires


If you ask my detractors, they would tell you that the reason I do not celebrate gay pride is that I’m a bigot. A hater. A homophobe. A transphobe.

And I understand their perspective.

After all, no matter how Christian I claim to be, if I tell a gay couple I do not believe they are truly married in God’s sight, that feels like hatred to them.

If I tell a woman who identifies as a man that I still believe she is a woman, that feels like hatred to her.

From their perspective, I can understand how unchristian my position seems, how bigoted, how biased, how primitive.

After all, they would be quick to point out, there are gay parents who are more devoted to their kids than some straight parents.

There are transgender men and women who are kind, gentle, caring souls.

There are people all across the LGBT spectrum who help the poor, who care for the oppressed, who love the loveless, who are outstanding bosses or employees or friends or neighbors.

Why shouldn’t all of us celebrate gay, or LGBT, pride?

For me, there are three major reasons, and none of them has anything to do with hatred or fear.

First, I do not accept the categories of LGBT as fixed and definite categories, worthy of special recognition.

Put another way, why should there be a special month to celebrate people based on their sexual desires and romantic attractions? Or based on their gender identity perceptions?

The very fact that we’ve gone from G (as in gay) to LG, to LGB, to LGBT, to LGBTQ, to LGBTQI to LGBTQIP (and beyond) indicates that these are hardly fixed categories.

Or, to zero in on the letter B, why should I celebrate someone who is attracted to both males and females? Why should I put them in a special category (like Hispanic or Asian or black)?

If the person happens to a courageous firefighter, I’ll celebrate him for that. If the person happens to be a cancer survivor with an amazing story, I’ll celebrate her for that.

They are fellow human beings, and if they deserve honor or commendation, I’ll gladly give that to them. But I won’t celebrate their bisexuality. Why should I?

And that leads to my second point.

If I’m convinced that homosexual practice is contrary to God’s design, why should I celebrate it?

If I personally know people whose same-sex attractions were the result of childhood sexual abuse and rape, why should I celebrate those attractions?

If I’m convinced that, ideally, a child should have a mommy and a daddy (rather than two mommies or two daddies), why should I celebrate a family setting that willfully deprives that child of either their mother or father?

Do we celebrate single-parent pride? No, we say to those single parents, “It must be hard to raise your child on your own, but we’re standing with you to help.”

There’s quite a difference.

And why should I celebrate transgender identity? What is there to celebrate?

Why should I celebrate putting a child on hormone blockers? Why should I celebrate a 17-year-old girl having her breasts removed? Why should I celebrate a lifelong regimen of hormones? Why should I celebrate something that causes so many people so much pain, even after “transitioning”?

If you asked me to stand with those who identify as transgender and offer them support and compassion and hope, I would say, “Count me in.”

If you asked me to stand against their harassment and mistreatment, again I would say, “Count me in.”

But if you ask me to celebrate their transgender identity (and all the challenges that come with it), I would have to politely decline.

Third, and finally, I do not celebrate LGBT pride because there is an agenda attached to it.
Find Out More >
46,666

In other words, this is not just a matter of me appreciating LGBT people as people, or recognizing their accomplishments for the sake of their accomplishments.

Instead, to celebrate LGBT pride is to recognize and embrace a larger cultural agenda.

As I explained in 2011, “the legitimizing of homosexuality as a perfectly normal alternative to heterosexuality also requires that all opposition to homosexual behavior must be delegitimized. At the very least, the gay agenda requires these three platforms (and let recognized gay leaders renounce this if it is not so).

“Whereas homosexuality was once considered a pathological disorder, from here on those who do not affirm homosexuality will be deemed homophobic, perhaps themselves suffering from a pathological disorder.

“Whereas gay sexual behavior was once considered morally wrong, from here on public condemnation – or even public criticism – of that behavior will be considered morally wrong.

“Whereas identifying as transgender was once considered abnormal by society, causing one to be marginalized, from here on those who do not accept transgenderism will be considered abnormal and will be marginalized.”

And remember, I wrote this in 2011. (In fact, I wrote this several years earlier, but these comments were not published until 2011.)

Again, from the LGBT viewpoint, LGBT pride is all about coming out of the closet. It’s about saying, “We’re just as good and as gifted and as normal as anyone else, and rather than being ashamed of our LGBT identity, we are proud of it. The days of being mistreated are over. That’s what LGBT pride is all about!”

Again, I understand these sentiments, and if it was a matter of caring for people as people, I’d march side by side with them.

But it’s not just that. It’s about creating new categories and foisting them on the society. It’s about celebrating something that should not be celebrated. It’s about a larger agenda.

For those reasons, I do not celebrate gay pride, even though it makes be a hateful bigot in the eyes of many LGBT people and their allies.

That saddens me, but that doesn’t change my convictions.

June remains just another month on my calendar. It is not marked off for LGBT prid

| Reply
Jun 11, 2019 09:22:12   #
debeda (a regular here)
 
no propaganda please wrote:
LGBTQI ETC.
Why I do not celebrate 'gay pride'
Michael Brown questions having special month for people based on their sexual desires


If you ask my detractors, they would tell you that the reason I do not celebrate gay pride is that I’m a bigot. A hater. A homophobe. A transphobe.

And I understand their perspective.

After all, no matter how Christian I claim to be, if I tell a gay couple I do not believe they are truly married in God’s sight, that feels like hatred to them.

If I tell a woman who identifies as a man that I still believe she is a woman, that feels like hatred to her.

From their perspective, I can understand how unchristian my position seems, how bigoted, how biased, how primitive.

After all, they would be quick to point out, there are gay parents who are more devoted to their kids than some straight parents.

There are transgender men and women who are kind, gentle, caring souls.

There are people all across the LGBT spectrum who help the poor, who care for the oppressed, who love the loveless, who are outstanding bosses or employees or friends or neighbors.

Why shouldn’t all of us celebrate gay, or LGBT, pride?

For me, there are three major reasons, and none of them has anything to do with hatred or fear.

First, I do not accept the categories of LGBT as fixed and definite categories, worthy of special recognition.

Put another way, why should there be a special month to celebrate people based on their sexual desires and romantic attractions? Or based on their gender identity perceptions?

The very fact that we’ve gone from G (as in gay) to LG, to LGB, to LGBT, to LGBTQ, to LGBTQI to LGBTQIP (and beyond) indicates that these are hardly fixed categories.

Or, to zero in on the letter B, why should I celebrate someone who is attracted to both males and females? Why should I put them in a special category (like Hispanic or Asian or black)?

If the person happens to a courageous firefighter, I’ll celebrate him for that. If the person happens to be a cancer survivor with an amazing story, I’ll celebrate her for that.

They are fellow human beings, and if they deserve honor or commendation, I’ll gladly give that to them. But I won’t celebrate their bisexuality. Why should I?

And that leads to my second point.

If I’m convinced that homosexual practice is contrary to God’s design, why should I celebrate it?

If I personally know people whose same-sex attractions were the result of childhood sexual abuse and rape, why should I celebrate those attractions?

If I’m convinced that, ideally, a child should have a mommy and a daddy (rather than two mommies or two daddies), why should I celebrate a family setting that willfully deprives that child of either their mother or father?

Do we celebrate single-parent pride? No, we say to those single parents, “It must be hard to raise your child on your own, but we’re standing with you to help.”

There’s quite a difference.

And why should I celebrate transgender identity? What is there to celebrate?

Why should I celebrate putting a child on hormone blockers? Why should I celebrate a 17-year-old girl having her breasts removed? Why should I celebrate a lifelong regimen of hormones? Why should I celebrate something that causes so many people so much pain, even after “transitioning”?

If you asked me to stand with those who identify as transgender and offer them support and compassion and hope, I would say, “Count me in.”

If you asked me to stand against their harassment and mistreatment, again I would say, “Count me in.”

But if you ask me to celebrate their transgender identity (and all the challenges that come with it), I would have to politely decline.

Third, and finally, I do not celebrate LGBT pride because there is an agenda attached to it.
Find Out More >
46,666

In other words, this is not just a matter of me appreciating LGBT people as people, or recognizing their accomplishments for the sake of their accomplishments.

Instead, to celebrate LGBT pride is to recognize and embrace a larger cultural agenda.

As I explained in 2011, “the legitimizing of homosexuality as a perfectly normal alternative to heterosexuality also requires that all opposition to homosexual behavior must be delegitimized. At the very least, the gay agenda requires these three platforms (and let recognized gay leaders renounce this if it is not so).

“Whereas homosexuality was once considered a pathological disorder, from here on those who do not affirm homosexuality will be deemed homophobic, perhaps themselves suffering from a pathological disorder.

“Whereas gay sexual behavior was once considered morally wrong, from here on public condemnation – or even public criticism – of that behavior will be considered morally wrong.

“Whereas identifying as transgender was once considered abnormal by society, causing one to be marginalized, from here on those who do not accept transgenderism will be considered abnormal and will be marginalized.”

And remember, I wrote this in 2011. (In fact, I wrote this several years earlier, but these comments were not published until 2011.)

Again, from the LGBT viewpoint, LGBT pride is all about coming out of the closet. It’s about saying, “We’re just as good and as gifted and as normal as anyone else, and rather than being ashamed of our LGBT identity, we are proud of it. The days of being mistreated are over. That’s what LGBT pride is all about!”

Again, I understand these sentiments, and if it was a matter of caring for people as people, I’d march side by side with them.

But it’s not just that. It’s about creating new categories and foisting them on the society. It’s about celebrating something that should not be celebrated. It’s about a larger agenda.

For those reasons, I do not celebrate gay pride, even though it makes be a hateful bigot in the eyes of many LGBT people and their allies.

That saddens me, but that doesn’t change my convictions.

June remains just another month on my calendar. It is not marked off for LGBT prid
LGBTQI ETC. br Why I do not celebrate 'gay pride' ... (show quote)


EXCELLENT piece! Thanks for sharing

| Reply
Jun 11, 2019 09:57:14   #
waltmoreno (a regular here)
 
no propaganda please wrote:
LGBTQI ETC.
Why I do not celebrate 'gay pride'
Michael Brown questions having special month for people based on their sexual desires


If you ask my detractors, they would tell you that the reason I do not celebrate gay pride is that I’m a bigot. A hater. A homophobe. A transphobe.

And I understand their perspective.

After all, no matter how Christian I claim to be, if I tell a gay couple I do not believe they are truly married in God’s sight, that feels like hatred to them.

If I tell a woman who identifies as a man that I still believe she is a woman, that feels like hatred to her.

From their perspective, I can understand how unchristian my position seems, how bigoted, how biased, how primitive.

After all, they would be quick to point out, there are gay parents who are more devoted to their kids than some straight parents.

There are transgender men and women who are kind, gentle, caring souls.

There are people all across the LGBT spectrum who help the poor, who care for the oppressed, who love the loveless, who are outstanding bosses or employees or friends or neighbors.

Why shouldn’t all of us celebrate gay, or LGBT, pride?

For me, there are three major reasons, and none of them has anything to do with hatred or fear.

First, I do not accept the categories of LGBT as fixed and definite categories, worthy of special recognition.

Put another way, why should there be a special month to celebrate people based on their sexual desires and romantic attractions? Or based on their gender identity perceptions?

The very fact that we’ve gone from G (as in gay) to LG, to LGB, to LGBT, to LGBTQ, to LGBTQI to LGBTQIP (and beyond) indicates that these are hardly fixed categories.

Or, to zero in on the letter B, why should I celebrate someone who is attracted to both males and females? Why should I put them in a special category (like Hispanic or Asian or black)?

If the person happens to a courageous firefighter, I’ll celebrate him for that. If the person happens to be a cancer survivor with an amazing story, I’ll celebrate her for that.

They are fellow human beings, and if they deserve honor or commendation, I’ll gladly give that to them. But I won’t celebrate their bisexuality. Why should I?

And that leads to my second point.

If I’m convinced that homosexual practice is contrary to God’s design, why should I celebrate it?

If I personally know people whose same-sex attractions were the result of childhood sexual abuse and rape, why should I celebrate those attractions?

If I’m convinced that, ideally, a child should have a mommy and a daddy (rather than two mommies or two daddies), why should I celebrate a family setting that willfully deprives that child of either their mother or father?

Do we celebrate single-parent pride? No, we say to those single parents, “It must be hard to raise your child on your own, but we’re standing with you to help.”

There’s quite a difference.

And why should I celebrate transgender identity? What is there to celebrate?

Why should I celebrate putting a child on hormone blockers? Why should I celebrate a 17-year-old girl having her breasts removed? Why should I celebrate a lifelong regimen of hormones? Why should I celebrate something that causes so many people so much pain, even after “transitioning”?

If you asked me to stand with those who identify as transgender and offer them support and compassion and hope, I would say, “Count me in.”

If you asked me to stand against their harassment and mistreatment, again I would say, “Count me in.”

But if you ask me to celebrate their transgender identity (and all the challenges that come with it), I would have to politely decline.

Third, and finally, I do not celebrate LGBT pride because there is an agenda attached to it.
Find Out More >
46,666

In other words, this is not just a matter of me appreciating LGBT people as people, or recognizing their accomplishments for the sake of their accomplishments.

Instead, to celebrate LGBT pride is to recognize and embrace a larger cultural agenda.

As I explained in 2011, “the legitimizing of homosexuality as a perfectly normal alternative to heterosexuality also requires that all opposition to homosexual behavior must be delegitimized. At the very least, the gay agenda requires these three platforms (and let recognized gay leaders renounce this if it is not so).

“Whereas homosexuality was once considered a pathological disorder, from here on those who do not affirm homosexuality will be deemed homophobic, perhaps themselves suffering from a pathological disorder.

“Whereas gay sexual behavior was once considered morally wrong, from here on public condemnation – or even public criticism – of that behavior will be considered morally wrong.

“Whereas identifying as transgender was once considered abnormal by society, causing one to be marginalized, from here on those who do not accept transgenderism will be considered abnormal and will be marginalized.”

And remember, I wrote this in 2011. (In fact, I wrote this several years earlier, but these comments were not published until 2011.)

Again, from the LGBT viewpoint, LGBT pride is all about coming out of the closet. It’s about saying, “We’re just as good and as gifted and as normal as anyone else, and rather than being ashamed of our LGBT identity, we are proud of it. The days of being mistreated are over. That’s what LGBT pride is all about!”

Again, I understand these sentiments, and if it was a matter of caring for people as people, I’d march side by side with them.

But it’s not just that. It’s about creating new categories and foisting them on the society. It’s about celebrating something that should not be celebrated. It’s about a larger agenda.

For those reasons, I do not celebrate gay pride, even though it makes be a hateful bigot in the eyes of many LGBT people and their allies.

That saddens me, but that doesn’t change my convictions.

June remains just another month on my calendar. It is not marked off for LGBT prid
LGBTQI ETC. br Why I do not celebrate 'gay pride' ... (show quote)


Spot on! Absolute clarity is needed to combat the agenda of the LGBT community. Anything less will not succeed. And this piece should just be the opening salvo in the effort to delegitimize those who oppose the gay agenda.

| Reply
Jun 11, 2019 10:33:24   #
bahmer (a regular here)
 
no propaganda please wrote:
LGBTQI ETC.
Why I do not celebrate 'gay pride'
Michael Brown questions having special month for people based on their sexual desires


If you ask my detractors, they would tell you that the reason I do not celebrate gay pride is that I’m a bigot. A hater. A homophobe. A transphobe.

And I understand their perspective.

After all, no matter how Christian I claim to be, if I tell a gay couple I do not believe they are truly married in God’s sight, that feels like hatred to them.

If I tell a woman who identifies as a man that I still believe she is a woman, that feels like hatred to her.

From their perspective, I can understand how unchristian my position seems, how bigoted, how biased, how primitive.

After all, they would be quick to point out, there are gay parents who are more devoted to their kids than some straight parents.

There are transgender men and women who are kind, gentle, caring souls.

There are people all across the LGBT spectrum who help the poor, who care for the oppressed, who love the loveless, who are outstanding bosses or employees or friends or neighbors.

Why shouldn’t all of us celebrate gay, or LGBT, pride?

For me, there are three major reasons, and none of them has anything to do with hatred or fear.

First, I do not accept the categories of LGBT as fixed and definite categories, worthy of special recognition.

Put another way, why should there be a special month to celebrate people based on their sexual desires and romantic attractions? Or based on their gender identity perceptions?

The very fact that we’ve gone from G (as in gay) to LG, to LGB, to LGBT, to LGBTQ, to LGBTQI to LGBTQIP (and beyond) indicates that these are hardly fixed categories.

Or, to zero in on the letter B, why should I celebrate someone who is attracted to both males and females? Why should I put them in a special category (like Hispanic or Asian or black)?

If the person happens to a courageous firefighter, I’ll celebrate him for that. If the person happens to be a cancer survivor with an amazing story, I’ll celebrate her for that.

They are fellow human beings, and if they deserve honor or commendation, I’ll gladly give that to them. But I won’t celebrate their bisexuality. Why should I?

And that leads to my second point.

If I’m convinced that homosexual practice is contrary to God’s design, why should I celebrate it?

If I personally know people whose same-sex attractions were the result of childhood sexual abuse and rape, why should I celebrate those attractions?

If I’m convinced that, ideally, a child should have a mommy and a daddy (rather than two mommies or two daddies), why should I celebrate a family setting that willfully deprives that child of either their mother or father?

Do we celebrate single-parent pride? No, we say to those single parents, “It must be hard to raise your child on your own, but we’re standing with you to help.”

There’s quite a difference.

And why should I celebrate transgender identity? What is there to celebrate?

Why should I celebrate putting a child on hormone blockers? Why should I celebrate a 17-year-old girl having her breasts removed? Why should I celebrate a lifelong regimen of hormones? Why should I celebrate something that causes so many people so much pain, even after “transitioning”?

If you asked me to stand with those who identify as transgender and offer them support and compassion and hope, I would say, “Count me in.”

If you asked me to stand against their harassment and mistreatment, again I would say, “Count me in.”

But if you ask me to celebrate their transgender identity (and all the challenges that come with it), I would have to politely decline.

Third, and finally, I do not celebrate LGBT pride because there is an agenda attached to it.
Find Out More >
46,666

In other words, this is not just a matter of me appreciating LGBT people as people, or recognizing their accomplishments for the sake of their accomplishments.

Instead, to celebrate LGBT pride is to recognize and embrace a larger cultural agenda.

As I explained in 2011, “the legitimizing of homosexuality as a perfectly normal alternative to heterosexuality also requires that all opposition to homosexual behavior must be delegitimized. At the very least, the gay agenda requires these three platforms (and let recognized gay leaders renounce this if it is not so).

“Whereas homosexuality was once considered a pathological disorder, from here on those who do not affirm homosexuality will be deemed homophobic, perhaps themselves suffering from a pathological disorder.

“Whereas gay sexual behavior was once considered morally wrong, from here on public condemnation – or even public criticism – of that behavior will be considered morally wrong.

“Whereas identifying as transgender was once considered abnormal by society, causing one to be marginalized, from here on those who do not accept transgenderism will be considered abnormal and will be marginalized.”

And remember, I wrote this in 2011. (In fact, I wrote this several years earlier, but these comments were not published until 2011.)

Again, from the LGBT viewpoint, LGBT pride is all about coming out of the closet. It’s about saying, “We’re just as good and as gifted and as normal as anyone else, and rather than being ashamed of our LGBT identity, we are proud of it. The days of being mistreated are over. That’s what LGBT pride is all about!”

Again, I understand these sentiments, and if it was a matter of caring for people as people, I’d march side by side with them.

But it’s not just that. It’s about creating new categories and foisting them on the society. It’s about celebrating something that should not be celebrated. It’s about a larger agenda.

For those reasons, I do not celebrate gay pride, even though it makes be a hateful bigot in the eyes of many LGBT people and their allies.

That saddens me, but that doesn’t change my convictions.

June remains just another month on my calendar. It is not marked off for LGBT prid
LGBTQI ETC. br Why I do not celebrate 'gay pride' ... (show quote)


Amen and Amen NPP thanks for this wonderful article and I stand with you and the author of this article as well.

| Reply
Jun 11, 2019 11:02:25   #
EL
 
no propaganda please wrote:
LGBTQI ETC.
Why I do not celebrate 'gay pride'
Michael Brown questions having special month for people based on their sexual desires


If you ask my detractors, they would tell you that the reason I do not celebrate gay pride is that I’m a bigot. A hater. A homophobe. A transphobe.

And I understand their perspective.

After all, no matter how Christian I claim to be, if I tell a gay couple I do not believe they are truly married in God’s sight, that feels like hatred to them.

If I tell a woman who identifies as a man that I still believe she is a woman, that feels like hatred to her.

From their perspective, I can understand how unchristian my position seems, how bigoted, how biased, how primitive.

After all, they would be quick to point out, there are gay parents who are more devoted to their kids than some straight parents.

There are transgender men and women who are kind, gentle, caring souls.

There are people all across the LGBT spectrum who help the poor, who care for the oppressed, who love the loveless, who are outstanding bosses or employees or friends or neighbors.

Why shouldn’t all of us celebrate gay, or LGBT, pride?

For me, there are three major reasons, and none of them has anything to do with hatred or fear.

First, I do not accept the categories of LGBT as fixed and definite categories, worthy of special recognition.

Put another way, why should there be a special month to celebrate people based on their sexual desires and romantic attractions? Or based on their gender identity perceptions?

The very fact that we’ve gone from G (as in gay) to LG, to LGB, to LGBT, to LGBTQ, to LGBTQI to LGBTQIP (and beyond) indicates that these are hardly fixed categories.

Or, to zero in on the letter B, why should I celebrate someone who is attracted to both males and females? Why should I put them in a special category (like Hispanic or Asian or black)?

If the person happens to a courageous firefighter, I’ll celebrate him for that. If the person happens to be a cancer survivor with an amazing story, I’ll celebrate her for that.

They are fellow human beings, and if they deserve honor or commendation, I’ll gladly give that to them. But I won’t celebrate their bisexuality. Why should I?

And that leads to my second point.

If I’m convinced that homosexual practice is contrary to God’s design, why should I celebrate it?

If I personally know people whose same-sex attractions were the result of childhood sexual abuse and rape, why should I celebrate those attractions?

If I’m convinced that, ideally, a child should have a mommy and a daddy (rather than two mommies or two daddies), why should I celebrate a family setting that willfully deprives that child of either their mother or father?

Do we celebrate single-parent pride? No, we say to those single parents, “It must be hard to raise your child on your own, but we’re standing with you to help.”

There’s quite a difference.

And why should I celebrate transgender identity? What is there to celebrate?

Why should I celebrate putting a child on hormone blockers? Why should I celebrate a 17-year-old girl having her breasts removed? Why should I celebrate a lifelong regimen of hormones? Why should I celebrate something that causes so many people so much pain, even after “transitioning”?

If you asked me to stand with those who identify as transgender and offer them support and compassion and hope, I would say, “Count me in.”

If you asked me to stand against their harassment and mistreatment, again I would say, “Count me in.”

But if you ask me to celebrate their transgender identity (and all the challenges that come with it), I would have to politely decline.

Third, and finally, I do not celebrate LGBT pride because there is an agenda attached to it.
Find Out More >
46,666

In other words, this is not just a matter of me appreciating LGBT people as people, or recognizing their accomplishments for the sake of their accomplishments.

Instead, to celebrate LGBT pride is to recognize and embrace a larger cultural agenda.

As I explained in 2011, “the legitimizing of homosexuality as a perfectly normal alternative to heterosexuality also requires that all opposition to homosexual behavior must be delegitimized. At the very least, the gay agenda requires these three platforms (and let recognized gay leaders renounce this if it is not so).

“Whereas homosexuality was once considered a pathological disorder, from here on those who do not affirm homosexuality will be deemed homophobic, perhaps themselves suffering from a pathological disorder.

“Whereas gay sexual behavior was once considered morally wrong, from here on public condemnation – or even public criticism – of that behavior will be considered morally wrong.

“Whereas identifying as transgender was once considered abnormal by society, causing one to be marginalized, from here on those who do not accept transgenderism will be considered abnormal and will be marginalized.”

And remember, I wrote this in 2011. (In fact, I wrote this several years earlier, but these comments were not published until 2011.)

Again, from the LGBT viewpoint, LGBT pride is all about coming out of the closet. It’s about saying, “We’re just as good and as gifted and as normal as anyone else, and rather than being ashamed of our LGBT identity, we are proud of it. The days of being mistreated are over. That’s what LGBT pride is all about!”

Again, I understand these sentiments, and if it was a matter of caring for people as people, I’d march side by side with them.

But it’s not just that. It’s about creating new categories and foisting them on the society. It’s about celebrating something that should not be celebrated. It’s about a larger agenda.

For those reasons, I do not celebrate gay pride, even though it makes be a hateful bigot in the eyes of many LGBT people and their allies.

That saddens me, but that doesn’t change my convictions.

June remains just another month on my calendar. It is not marked off for LGBT prid
LGBTQI ETC. br Why I do not celebrate 'gay pride' ... (show quote)


That is truly great and should go around the world.

| Reply
Jun 11, 2019 12:04:08   #
no propaganda please (a regular here)
 
EL wrote:
That is truly great and should go around the world.


So often other posters on OPP have accused me of being hateful because I will NOT celebrate homosexual behavior and validate the lies that the LGBTQ activists spew on a daily basis. Working with boys who have been abused, both physically and sexually, they are so vulnurable to the BS put out there by the LGBTQ and we have to assure them that just because they were molested by men does not mean that they are same sex attracted, often it is because they are desperately seeking a father to love them, and a way to escape the violence and despair of their home life. So the LGBTQ lies really get to me, but I cannot express the anger and frustration . This article says it all, in a way I cannot. Please forward it to any people who will at least think about it rather than buy the BS put out by the progressives on a daily basis.

| Reply
Jun 11, 2019 12:32:20   #
Rose42 (a regular here)
 
no propaganda please wrote:
LGBTQI ETC.
Why I do not celebrate 'gay pride'
Michael Brown questions having special month for people based on their sexual desires


If you ask my detractors, they would tell you that the reason I do not celebrate gay pride is that I’m a bigot. A hater. A homophobe. A transphobe.

And I understand their perspective.

After all, no matter how Christian I claim to be, if I tell a gay couple I do not believe they are truly married in God’s sight, that feels like hatred to them.

If I tell a woman who identifies as a man that I still believe she is a woman, that feels like hatred to her.

From their perspective, I can understand how unchristian my position seems, how bigoted, how biased, how primitive.

After all, they would be quick to point out, there are gay parents who are more devoted to their kids than some straight parents.

There are transgender men and women who are kind, gentle, caring souls.

There are people all across the LGBT spectrum who help the poor, who care for the oppressed, who love the loveless, who are outstanding bosses or employees or friends or neighbors.

Why shouldn’t all of us celebrate gay, or LGBT, pride?

For me, there are three major reasons, and none of them has anything to do with hatred or fear.

First, I do not accept the categories of LGBT as fixed and definite categories, worthy of special recognition.

Put another way, why should there be a special month to celebrate people based on their sexual desires and romantic attractions? Or based on their gender identity perceptions?

The very fact that we’ve gone from G (as in gay) to LG, to LGB, to LGBT, to LGBTQ, to LGBTQI to LGBTQIP (and beyond) indicates that these are hardly fixed categories.

Or, to zero in on the letter B, why should I celebrate someone who is attracted to both males and females? Why should I put them in a special category (like Hispanic or Asian or black)?

If the person happens to a courageous firefighter, I’ll celebrate him for that. If the person happens to be a cancer survivor with an amazing story, I’ll celebrate her for that.

They are fellow human beings, and if they deserve honor or commendation, I’ll gladly give that to them. But I won’t celebrate their bisexuality. Why should I?

And that leads to my second point.

If I’m convinced that homosexual practice is contrary to God’s design, why should I celebrate it?

If I personally know people whose same-sex attractions were the result of childhood sexual abuse and rape, why should I celebrate those attractions?

If I’m convinced that, ideally, a child should have a mommy and a daddy (rather than two mommies or two daddies), why should I celebrate a family setting that willfully deprives that child of either their mother or father?

Do we celebrate single-parent pride? No, we say to those single parents, “It must be hard to raise your child on your own, but we’re standing with you to help.”

There’s quite a difference.

And why should I celebrate transgender identity? What is there to celebrate?

Why should I celebrate putting a child on hormone blockers? Why should I celebrate a 17-year-old girl having her breasts removed? Why should I celebrate a lifelong regimen of hormones? Why should I celebrate something that causes so many people so much pain, even after “transitioning”?

If you asked me to stand with those who identify as transgender and offer them support and compassion and hope, I would say, “Count me in.”

If you asked me to stand against their harassment and mistreatment, again I would say, “Count me in.”

But if you ask me to celebrate their transgender identity (and all the challenges that come with it), I would have to politely decline.

Third, and finally, I do not celebrate LGBT pride because there is an agenda attached to it.
Find Out More >
46,666

In other words, this is not just a matter of me appreciating LGBT people as people, or recognizing their accomplishments for the sake of their accomplishments.

Instead, to celebrate LGBT pride is to recognize and embrace a larger cultural agenda.

As I explained in 2011, “the legitimizing of homosexuality as a perfectly normal alternative to heterosexuality also requires that all opposition to homosexual behavior must be delegitimized. At the very least, the gay agenda requires these three platforms (and let recognized gay leaders renounce this if it is not so).

“Whereas homosexuality was once considered a pathological disorder, from here on those who do not affirm homosexuality will be deemed homophobic, perhaps themselves suffering from a pathological disorder.

“Whereas gay sexual behavior was once considered morally wrong, from here on public condemnation – or even public criticism – of that behavior will be considered morally wrong.

“Whereas identifying as transgender was once considered abnormal by society, causing one to be marginalized, from here on those who do not accept transgenderism will be considered abnormal and will be marginalized.”

And remember, I wrote this in 2011. (In fact, I wrote this several years earlier, but these comments were not published until 2011.)

Again, from the LGBT viewpoint, LGBT pride is all about coming out of the closet. It’s about saying, “We’re just as good and as gifted and as normal as anyone else, and rather than being ashamed of our LGBT identity, we are proud of it. The days of being mistreated are over. That’s what LGBT pride is all about!”

Again, I understand these sentiments, and if it was a matter of caring for people as people, I’d march side by side with them.

But it’s not just that. It’s about creating new categories and foisting them on the society. It’s about celebrating something that should not be celebrated. It’s about a larger agenda.

For those reasons, I do not celebrate gay pride, even though it makes be a hateful bigot in the eyes of many LGBT people and their allies.

That saddens me, but that doesn’t change my convictions.

June remains just another month on my calendar. It is not marked off for LGBT prid
LGBTQI ETC. br Why I do not celebrate 'gay pride' ... (show quote)


Well said.

| Reply
Jun 11, 2019 12:48:01   #
bilordinary (a regular here)
 
All this attention for 2% of the people makes no sense to me.
Just a tool to create division!

| Reply
Jun 12, 2019 21:13:10   #
Mr. Rogers
 
no propaganda please wrote:
LGBTQI ETC.
Why I do not celebrate 'gay pride'
Michael Brown questions having special month for people based on their sexual desires


If you ask my detractors, they would tell you that the reason I do not celebrate gay pride is that I’m a bigot. A hater. A homophobe. A transphobe.

And I understand their perspective.

After all, no matter how Christian I claim to be, if I tell a gay couple I do not believe they are truly married in God’s sight, that feels like hatred to them.

If I tell a woman who identifies as a man that I still believe she is a woman, that feels like hatred to her.

From their perspective, I can understand how unchristian my position seems, how bigoted, how biased, how primitive.

After all, they would be quick to point out, there are gay parents who are more devoted to their kids than some straight parents.

There are transgender men and women who are kind, gentle, caring souls.

There are people all across the LGBT spectrum who help the poor, who care for the oppressed, who love the loveless, who are outstanding bosses or employees or friends or neighbors.

Why shouldn’t all of us celebrate gay, or LGBT, pride?

For me, there are three major reasons, and none of them has anything to do with hatred or fear.

First, I do not accept the categories of LGBT as fixed and definite categories, worthy of special recognition.

Put another way, why should there be a special month to celebrate people based on their sexual desires and romantic attractions? Or based on their gender identity perceptions?

The very fact that we’ve gone from G (as in gay) to LG, to LGB, to LGBT, to LGBTQ, to LGBTQI to LGBTQIP (and beyond) indicates that these are hardly fixed categories.

Or, to zero in on the letter B, why should I celebrate someone who is attracted to both males and females? Why should I put them in a special category (like Hispanic or Asian or black)?

If the person happens to a courageous firefighter, I’ll celebrate him for that. If the person happens to be a cancer survivor with an amazing story, I’ll celebrate her for that.

They are fellow human beings, and if they deserve honor or commendation, I’ll gladly give that to them. But I won’t celebrate their bisexuality. Why should I?

And that leads to my second point.

If I’m convinced that homosexual practice is contrary to God’s design, why should I celebrate it?

If I personally know people whose same-sex attractions were the result of childhood sexual abuse and rape, why should I celebrate those attractions?

If I’m convinced that, ideally, a child should have a mommy and a daddy (rather than two mommies or two daddies), why should I celebrate a family setting that willfully deprives that child of either their mother or father?

Do we celebrate single-parent pride? No, we say to those single parents, “It must be hard to raise your child on your own, but we’re standing with you to help.”

There’s quite a difference.

And why should I celebrate transgender identity? What is there to celebrate?

Why should I celebrate putting a child on hormone blockers? Why should I celebrate a 17-year-old girl having her breasts removed? Why should I celebrate a lifelong regimen of hormones? Why should I celebrate something that causes so many people so much pain, even after “transitioning”?

If you asked me to stand with those who identify as transgender and offer them support and compassion and hope, I would say, “Count me in.”

If you asked me to stand against their harassment and mistreatment, again I would say, “Count me in.”

But if you ask me to celebrate their transgender identity (and all the challenges that come with it), I would have to politely decline.

Third, and finally, I do not celebrate LGBT pride because there is an agenda attached to it.
Find Out More >
46,666

In other words, this is not just a matter of me appreciating LGBT people as people, or recognizing their accomplishments for the sake of their accomplishments.

Instead, to celebrate LGBT pride is to recognize and embrace a larger cultural agenda.

As I explained in 2011, “the legitimizing of homosexuality as a perfectly normal alternative to heterosexuality also requires that all opposition to homosexual behavior must be delegitimized. At the very least, the gay agenda requires these three platforms (and let recognized gay leaders renounce this if it is not so).

“Whereas homosexuality was once considered a pathological disorder, from here on those who do not affirm homosexuality will be deemed homophobic, perhaps themselves suffering from a pathological disorder.

“Whereas gay sexual behavior was once considered morally wrong, from here on public condemnation – or even public criticism – of that behavior will be considered morally wrong.

“Whereas identifying as transgender was once considered abnormal by society, causing one to be marginalized, from here on those who do not accept transgenderism will be considered abnormal and will be marginalized.”

And remember, I wrote this in 2011. (In fact, I wrote this several years earlier, but these comments were not published until 2011.)

Again, from the LGBT viewpoint, LGBT pride is all about coming out of the closet. It’s about saying, “We’re just as good and as gifted and as normal as anyone else, and rather than being ashamed of our LGBT identity, we are proud of it. The days of being mistreated are over. That’s what LGBT pride is all about!”

Again, I understand these sentiments, and if it was a matter of caring for people as people, I’d march side by side with them.

But it’s not just that. It’s about creating new categories and foisting them on the society. It’s about celebrating something that should not be celebrated. It’s about a larger agenda.

For those reasons, I do not celebrate gay pride, even though it makes be a hateful bigot in the eyes of many LGBT people and their allies.

That saddens me, but that doesn’t change my convictions.

June remains just another month on my calendar. It is not marked off for LGBT prid
LGBTQI ETC. br Why I do not celebrate 'gay pride' ... (show quote)



The call to repentance is for everyone, no matter what form of bondage-to-sin a person is in.

| Reply
Jun 12, 2019 22:09:53   #
maryjane (a regular here)
 
no propaganda please wrote:
LGBTQI ETC.
Why I do not celebrate 'gay pride'
Michael Brown questions having special month for people based on their sexual desires


If you ask my detractors, they would tell you that the reason I do not celebrate gay pride is that I’m a bigot. A hater. A homophobe. A transphobe.

And I understand their perspective.

After all, no matter how Christian I claim to be, if I tell a gay couple I do not believe they are truly married in God’s sight, that feels like hatred to them.

If I tell a woman who identifies as a man that I still believe she is a woman, that feels like hatred to her.

From their perspective, I can understand how unchristian my position seems, how bigoted, how biased, how primitive.

After all, they would be quick to point out, there are gay parents who are more devoted to their kids than some straight parents.

There are transgender men and women who are kind, gentle, caring souls.

There are people all across the LGBT spectrum who help the poor, who care for the oppressed, who love the loveless, who are outstanding bosses or employees or friends or neighbors.

Why shouldn’t all of us celebrate gay, or LGBT, pride?

For me, there are three major reasons, and none of them has anything to do with hatred or fear.

First, I do not accept the categories of LGBT as fixed and definite categories, worthy of special recognition.

Put another way, why should there be a special month to celebrate people based on their sexual desires and romantic attractions? Or based on their gender identity perceptions?

The very fact that we’ve gone from G (as in gay) to LG, to LGB, to LGBT, to LGBTQ, to LGBTQI to LGBTQIP (and beyond) indicates that these are hardly fixed categories.

Or, to zero in on the letter B, why should I celebrate someone who is attracted to both males and females? Why should I put them in a special category (like Hispanic or Asian or black)?

If the person happens to a courageous firefighter, I’ll celebrate him for that. If the person happens to be a cancer survivor with an amazing story, I’ll celebrate her for that.

They are fellow human beings, and if they deserve honor or commendation, I’ll gladly give that to them. But I won’t celebrate their bisexuality. Why should I?

And that leads to my second point.

If I’m convinced that homosexual practice is contrary to God’s design, why should I celebrate it?

If I personally know people whose same-sex attractions were the result of childhood sexual abuse and rape, why should I celebrate those attractions?

If I’m convinced that, ideally, a child should have a mommy and a daddy (rather than two mommies or two daddies), why should I celebrate a family setting that willfully deprives that child of either their mother or father?

Do we celebrate single-parent pride? No, we say to those single parents, “It must be hard to raise your child on your own, but we’re standing with you to help.”

There’s quite a difference.

And why should I celebrate transgender identity? What is there to celebrate?

Why should I celebrate putting a child on hormone blockers? Why should I celebrate a 17-year-old girl having her breasts removed? Why should I celebrate a lifelong regimen of hormones? Why should I celebrate something that causes so many people so much pain, even after “transitioning”?

If you asked me to stand with those who identify as transgender and offer them support and compassion and hope, I would say, “Count me in.”

If you asked me to stand against their harassment and mistreatment, again I would say, “Count me in.”

But if you ask me to celebrate their transgender identity (and all the challenges that come with it), I would have to politely decline.

Third, and finally, I do not celebrate LGBT pride because there is an agenda attached to it.
Find Out More >
46,666

In other words, this is not just a matter of me appreciating LGBT people as people, or recognizing their accomplishments for the sake of their accomplishments.

Instead, to celebrate LGBT pride is to recognize and embrace a larger cultural agenda.

As I explained in 2011, “the legitimizing of homosexuality as a perfectly normal alternative to heterosexuality also requires that all opposition to homosexual behavior must be delegitimized. At the very least, the gay agenda requires these three platforms (and let recognized gay leaders renounce this if it is not so).

“Whereas homosexuality was once considered a pathological disorder, from here on those who do not affirm homosexuality will be deemed homophobic, perhaps themselves suffering from a pathological disorder.

“Whereas gay sexual behavior was once considered morally wrong, from here on public condemnation – or even public criticism – of that behavior will be considered morally wrong.

“Whereas identifying as transgender was once considered abnormal by society, causing one to be marginalized, from here on those who do not accept transgenderism will be considered abnormal and will be marginalized.”

And remember, I wrote this in 2011. (In fact, I wrote this several years earlier, but these comments were not published until 2011.)

Again, from the LGBT viewpoint, LGBT pride is all about coming out of the closet. It’s about saying, “We’re just as good and as gifted and as normal as anyone else, and rather than being ashamed of our LGBT identity, we are proud of it. The days of being mistreated are over. That’s what LGBT pride is all about!”

Again, I understand these sentiments, and if it was a matter of caring for people as people, I’d march side by side with them.

But it’s not just that. It’s about creating new categories and foisting them on the society. It’s about celebrating something that should not be celebrated. It’s about a larger agenda.

For those reasons, I do not celebrate gay pride, even though it makes be a hateful bigot in the eyes of many LGBT people and their allies.

That saddens me, but that doesn’t change my convictions.

June remains just another month on my calendar. It is not marked off for LGBT prid
LGBTQI ETC. br Why I do not celebrate 'gay pride' ... (show quote)


I totally agree. I am a live and let live person and have no hatred for anyone. But I very much resent the transgender folks pushing to impose their views on everyone, for pushing those views on vulnerable children, for demanding jobs like the military knowing their sexual views make them totally unsuited to those jobs. But what I resent most of all is their demand to be given special status in our society, special rights, special treatment. Our laws , constitution and Bill of Rights covers every USA citizen and that is sufficient. I am against "hate crimes" as a legal action because that confers specialness to sone lives over others which is against everything this nation gas ever stood for. No one has the right to say, if a transgender is murdered because of his/her sexual mores and a homeless woman is murdered because she is homeless/helpless and a child is murdered for sex, that the life of the transgender was more important or deserving of greater punishment. Just as women forever pushing the abortion anytime issue have gone too far, the transgenders pushing the any gender/no gender, putting themselves forward as role models for young children, marching in public barely/no clothed, demanding taxpayers pay for their choices of sex change surgery have pushed their agenda too far. Now, both these groups and their agendas are being rejected which was too be expected when each group CHOSE to shove their agendas down the throats of 300 million of their fellow citizens.

| Reply
Jun 12, 2019 22:27:35   #
DogLover99 (a regular here)
 
If you are gay, find other gay people and enjoy yourselves but stop trying to cram your life style down our throats.

| Reply
Jun 12, 2019 23:15:26   #
debeda (a regular here)
 
DogLover99 wrote:
If you are gay, find other gay people and enjoy yourselves but stop trying to cram your life style down our throats.



| Reply
Jun 13, 2019 02:11:41   #
Ricktloml (a regular here)
 
no propaganda please wrote:
So often other posters on OPP have accused me of being hateful because I will NOT celebrate homosexual behavior and validate the lies that the LGBTQ activists spew on a daily basis. Working with boys who have been abused, both physically and sexually, they are so vulnurable to the BS put out there by the LGBTQ and we have to assure them that just because they were molested by men does not mean that they are same sex attracted, often it is because they are desperately seeking a father to love them, and a way to escape the violence and despair of their home life. So the LGBTQ lies really get to me, but I cannot express the anger and frustration . This article says it all, in a way I cannot. Please forward it to any people who will at least think about it rather than buy the BS put out by the progressives on a daily basis.
So often other posters on OPP have accused me of b... (show quote)


Because of this agenda older men preying on teens and young boys used to be called child molesters, now the homosexual community calls them "mentors". And this same "tolerant" agenda has made it illegal for people who want help dealing with this mental disorder to get it. There is nothing to celebrate

| Reply
Jun 13, 2019 07:03:52   #
waltmoreno (a regular here)
 
Ricktloml wrote:
Because of this agenda older men preying on teens and young boys used to be called child molesters, now the homosexual community calls them "mentors". And this same "tolerant" agenda has made it illegal for people who want help dealing with this mental disorder to get it. There is nothing to celebrate


Satan and his minions are certainly celebrating. As are the die-hard members of the LGBTQ community who instinctively know that the best and surest way to convert those fence straddlers who still properly feel conflicted about engaging in same sex activities with other homosexuals and hence will possibly revert back to once again being heterosexual is to celebrate their homosexuality by engaging in loud and boisterous "gay pride" activities and parades which effectively drowns out that still small voice of conscience.

| Reply
Jun 13, 2019 08:41:37   #
no propaganda please (a regular here)
 
Ricktloml wrote:
Because of this agenda older men preying on teens and young boys used to be called child molesters, now the homosexual community calls them "mentors". And this same "tolerant" agenda has made it illegal for people who want help dealing with this mental disorder to get it. There is nothing to celebrate


You are absolutely correct. The LGBTQ concept is to remove all limits on who has sex with whom. Blame Alfred Kinsey for this. He and the child molesters that helped him with his "research" intentionally removed all barriers because it is easy to control people who are focused on sexual pleasures. All you need to do is add SOMA and your brave new world is complete.

| Reply
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