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Is this Nazi Germany or America
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Feb 9, 2019 13:06:24   #
debeda (a regular here)
 
Sicilianthing wrote:
>>>

Not really no but it’s possible he’s working for another rival gang.



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Feb 9, 2019 13:13:39   #
Sicilianthing (suspended)
 
debeda wrote:


>>>

That’s what it’s starting to look like and I’m very concerned.

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Feb 9, 2019 13:18:42   #
emarine (a regular here)
 
Bcon wrote:
Anything that does not fit in with your left headed way of thinking is a bullshit story. You sound like you are an authority. You must really wallow in bullshit. O, wait. Of course you do. Your a friggin liberal.




So you donated again...

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Feb 9, 2019 15:09:58   #
boofhead
 
Kevyn wrote:
Yup, those nazis held Hitlers accomplices accountable for their crimes. Wake up boy, the feds raided the lair of a criminal who is in bed with our Russian adversaries, they injured no one and secured evidence before he could destroy it. It was a textbook opperation.


I used to wonder if what happened in Nazi Germany before and during WWII could happen here. Would the citizens of a free and open Republic go along with obvious illegal activity such as the attack on the Stone house, act like thugs and enforce the will of an obviously rogue department such as the FBI (in this case at least)? Or would those agents refuse to follow such obviously illegal orders?

We know what happened in Germany. Now we know it is, and has, happening here too.

If our fellow citizens who carry the guns do not have the courage to say "NO!" then what hope have we?

We cannot count on the rule of law. We cannot count on justice or fairness. We cannot count on the people who are paid to protect us, our laws or way of life. The Jews had to wear a yellow star. What will they put on my shirt?

Get used to it, folks! Kevin and his ilk RULE!

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Feb 9, 2019 16:16:10   #
Sicilianthing (suspended)
 
boofhead wrote:
I used to wonder if what happened in Nazi Germany before and during WWII could happen here. Would the citizens of a free and open Republic go along with obvious illegal activity such as the attack on the Stone house, act like thugs and enforce the will of an obviously rogue department such as the FBI (in this case at least)? Or would those agents refuse to follow such obviously illegal orders?

We know what happened in Germany. Now we know it is, and has, happening here too.

If our fellow citizens who carry the guns do not have the courage to say "NO!" then what hope have we?

We cannot count on the rule of law. We cannot count on justice or fairness. We cannot count on the people who are paid to protect us, our laws or way of life. The Jews had to wear a yellow star. What will they put on my shirt?

Get used to it, folks! Kevin and his ilk RULE!
I used to wonder if what happened in Nazi Germany ... (show quote)


>>>

Because:



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Feb 9, 2019 21:20:47   #
1ProudAmerican
 
Kevyn wrote:
Yup, those nazis held Hitlers accomplices accountable for their crimes. Wake up boy, the feds raided the lair of a criminal who is in bed with our Russian adversaries, they injured no one and secured evidence before he could destroy it. It was a textbook opperation.
THIS applies to kevy...
THIS applies to kevy......

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Feb 9, 2019 21:28:52   #
1ProudAmerican
 
Bcon wrote:
Anything that does not fit in with your left headed way of thinking is a bullshit story. You sound like you are an authority. You must really wallow in bullshit. O, wait. Of course you do. Your a friggin liberal.


We ALL know the DEMON-RAT liberals have...


and, when speaking to a liberal...
and, when speaking to a liberal......

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Feb 9, 2019 21:49:57   #
teabag09 (a regular here)
 
Bcon, were you responding to proud republican? If you were you should know her history. She is a Russian Jew who escaped percussion with her family, and immigrated to several countries before legally immigrating here. She knows full well about the Nazis and the communists and the rest. She is also well acquainted with our Constitution, Bill of Rights and Federalists Papers. She speaks and writes the English language better than most here on OPP so I sincerely hope you were responding to another post.

For the record, I'm with you most of the time, just not this one. Mike
Bcon wrote:
You are much too young and uninformed of what it was like under the Nazi regime. I was young but I do remember the talk of the times of what was happening in the countries Germany invaded and later of the atrocities committed. Raids like this one, using a small platoon of armed, over the top, police were the norm and condemned as barbaric. To think it is happening in America can not only show where we are headed as a nation, but also how far we are into becoming a police state. When you need a platoon of police to raid a 60 year old and his wife in the middle of the night, you know it is more than a scare tactic. Mistakes have been made over and over in these uncalled for situations and innocent people have died. If you are so naive as to make a joke of it only shows that you are a completely stupid, naive, ass who has no concept of what is happening in the world around him. Why don’t you and your partner go back into the basement and retreat from real life.
You are much too young and uninformed of what it w... (show quote)

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Feb 9, 2019 21:56:40   #
Ricktloml
 
Bcon wrote:
You are much too young and uninformed of what it was like under the Nazi regime. I was young but I do remember the talk of the times of what was happening in the countries Germany invaded and later of the atrocities committed. Raids like this one, using a small platoon of armed, over the top, police were the norm and condemned as barbaric. To think it is happening in America can not only show where we are headed as a nation, but also how far we are into becoming a police state. When you need a platoon of police to raid a 60 year old and his wife in the middle of the night, you know it is more than a scare tactic. Mistakes have been made over and over in these uncalled for situations and innocent people have died. If you are so naive as to make a joke of it only shows that you are a completely stupid, naive, ass who has no concept of what is happening in the world around him. Why don’t you and your partner go back into the basement and retreat from real life.
You are much too young and uninformed of what it w... (show quote)


Perhaps you are unaware that Proud Republican immigrated (legally,)here from Russia. She is well aware of totalitarian government actions and the KGB. She is also a President Trump supporter.

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Feb 10, 2019 14:23:12   #
cbpat1 (a regular here)
 
Kevyn wrote:
Yup, those nazis held Hitlers accomplices accountable for their crimes. Wake up boy, the feds raided the lair of a criminal who is in bed with our Russian adversaries, they injured no one and secured evidence before he could destroy it. It was a textbook opperation.



Hitler this, Hitler that! You libs use dangerous language kevyn. Come on, kevyn, really, what big crime against humanity has Roger Stone committed? Mueller is a dirty player, simple as that. Give him a choice of 45 years, or make something up. Most people would make something up, rather than serve serious jail time.

He's a jerk, kevyn, and so are you for cheering him on, and your nonsensical references to Hitler. the latter is getting extremely old and tiring.

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Feb 10, 2019 15:08:18   #
Bad Bob
 
cbpat1 wrote:
Hitler this, Hitler that! You libs use dangerous language kevyn. Come on, kevyn, really, what big crime against humanity has Roger Stone committed? Mueller is a dirty player, simple as that. Give him a choice of 45 years, or make something up. Most people would make something up, rather than serve serious jail time.

He's a jerk, kevyn, and so are you for cheering him on, and your nonsensical references to Hitler. the latter is getting extremely old and tiring.



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Feb 10, 2019 21:54:45   #
Bernhard
 
I can't believe that the FBI had a search warrant, at least not a proper one. So, they had no right in your house or to inspect anything or take anything. A good judge should throw out the case immediately. Roger should be able to sue the Federal Government for big bucks.

Much of this stuff will stop only when enough US voters vote out the Democrats.

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Feb 10, 2019 22:54:33   #
debeda (a regular here)
 
Bernhard wrote:
I can't believe that the FBI had a search warrant, at least not a proper one. So, they had no right in your house or to inspect anything or take anything. A good judge should throw out the case immediately. Roger should be able to sue the Federal Government for big bucks.

Much of this stuff will stop only when enough US voters vote out the Democrats.



| Reply
Feb 10, 2019 23:09:26   #
Geo
 
Just because you never received a speeding ticket, doesn't mean you don't speed.

Harry Litman
Contributing columnist focused on legal issues

January 25
The immediate reaction from the camp of President Trump to the news of Friday’s arrest of longtime associate and political trickster Roger Stone was to minimize the charges as “mere process” crimes.

“Another false statement case? God Almighty,” Rudolph W. Giuliani told The Post, dismissing the seven-count indictment as just “a lot about ‘I don’t remember this.’ ”

Good luck holding that line in the coming days.

First, there is the possibility that special counsel Robert S. Mueller III has, or is in the process of developing, more substantive charges against Stone. Stone is the closest associate of the president that Mueller has charged, and we can expect the special counsel to exert maximum leverage to secure Stone’s cooperation in his continuing probe. Mueller’s strategy may be to hold back on some charges and let Stone know what misery he can still avoid by coming clean.

In general, the new indictment pairs Stone’s alleged activities in this country during the 2016 campaign with the conspiracy charges Mueller brought in July against a dozen Russian military intelligence officers and a Russian organization now accused of hacking the Hillary Clinton campaign’s computer networks and coordinating the release of the hacked emails to influence the election in Trump’s favor.

The Stone indictment suggests a clear link between Stone and the actions of WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange, who once more stands revealed as a scurrilous and strange political operative rather than the crusading journalist some imagine.

Opinion | Here's what we know — and don't know — about Trump's pardon power
Can the president pardon himself? Legal expert and Post Opinions contributor Randall D. Eliason answers key questions in the Mueller investigation. (Joy Yi, Kate Woodsome, Danielle Kunitz/The Washington Post)

The indictment alleges conduct on Stone’s part that essentially suggests a role in the hacking conspiracy. One of the several tangible examples from indictment: Far from being a passive recipient of the hacked emails, Stone sent a message through radio personality Randy Credico to Assange asking for damaging emails relating to Clinton’s tenure as secretary of state.


These allegations carry the potential for charging Stone with substantive crimes related to the Russian hacking conspiracy, either under 18 U.S.C. §371 for attempting to influence the election or as accessory after the fact to the hacking under 18 U.S.C.§ 3.

It is also possible that future searches of Stone’s New York City residence will turn up other inculpatory emails, such as the one in which Stone tells Credico to“do a ‘Frank Pentangeli’ ” — i.e., lie and dissemble under oath like the mob underling in “The Godfather Part II” — when Credico was testifying to Congress about what Stone may have done. The unsealed indictment also includes a subsequent email by Stone calling Credico a “rat” and a “stoolie,” for ignoring his suggestion and then threatening to take Credico’s service dog away from him, and telling him to “prepare to die.”

All this leads to the more important refutation of the “mere process” canard that Giuliani and others assert. The most serious charge in the indictment is obstruction of justice, an accusation that usually results in the physical arrest of the defendant, contrary to the suggestions of Stone’s defenders that his arrest was heavy-handed. The indictment alleges that Stone obstructed investigations into Russian interference in the 2016 election by the (Republican-controlled) House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.


What Stone allegedly has done is throw sand in the gears of efforts by Congress to learn the extent of Russian interference in a U.S. election. The possibility that a foreign government conspired with a U.S. presidential campaign to sway an American election has been staring us in the face for two years. Congress has no greater public responsibility than fully investigating this nightmarish prospect and taking all steps to prevent its recurrence.

Efforts to undermine that imperative are sinister and serious, and anything but a “mere process” crime.

The writer teaches constitutional law at the University of California at San Diego and practices law at the firm Constantine Cannon. He was U.S. attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania from 1998 to 2001 and deputy assistant attorney general from 1993 to 1998.

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Feb 10, 2019 23:13:16   #
debeda (a regular here)
 
Geo wrote:
Just because you never received a speeding ticket, doesn't mean you don't speed.

Harry Litman
Contributing columnist focused on legal issues

January 25
The immediate reaction from the camp of President Trump to the news of Friday’s arrest of longtime associate and political trickster Roger Stone was to minimize the charges as “mere process” crimes.

“Another false statement case? God Almighty,” Rudolph W. Giuliani told The Post, dismissing the seven-count indictment as just “a lot about ‘I don’t remember this.’ ”

Good luck holding that line in the coming days.

First, there is the possibility that special counsel Robert S. Mueller III has, or is in the process of developing, more substantive charges against Stone. Stone is the closest associate of the president that Mueller has charged, and we can expect the special counsel to exert maximum leverage to secure Stone’s cooperation in his continuing probe. Mueller’s strategy may be to hold back on some charges and let Stone know what misery he can still avoid by coming clean.

In general, the new indictment pairs Stone’s alleged activities in this country during the 2016 campaign with the conspiracy charges Mueller brought in July against a dozen Russian military intelligence officers and a Russian organization now accused of hacking the Hillary Clinton campaign’s computer networks and coordinating the release of the hacked emails to influence the election in Trump’s favor.

The Stone indictment suggests a clear link between Stone and the actions of WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange, who once more stands revealed as a scurrilous and strange political operative rather than the crusading journalist some imagine.

Opinion | Here's what we know — and don't know — about Trump's pardon power
Can the president pardon himself? Legal expert and Post Opinions contributor Randall D. Eliason answers key questions in the Mueller investigation. (Joy Yi, Kate Woodsome, Danielle Kunitz/The Washington Post)

The indictment alleges conduct on Stone’s part that essentially suggests a role in the hacking conspiracy. One of the several tangible examples from indictment: Far from being a passive recipient of the hacked emails, Stone sent a message through radio personality Randy Credico to Assange asking for damaging emails relating to Clinton’s tenure as secretary of state.


These allegations carry the potential for charging Stone with substantive crimes related to the Russian hacking conspiracy, either under 18 U.S.C. §371 for attempting to influence the election or as accessory after the fact to the hacking under 18 U.S.C.§ 3.

It is also possible that future searches of Stone’s New York City residence will turn up other inculpatory emails, such as the one in which Stone tells Credico to“do a ‘Frank Pentangeli’ ” — i.e., lie and dissemble under oath like the mob underling in “The Godfather Part II” — when Credico was testifying to Congress about what Stone may have done. The unsealed indictment also includes a subsequent email by Stone calling Credico a “rat” and a “stoolie,” for ignoring his suggestion and then threatening to take Credico’s service dog away from him, and telling him to “prepare to die.”

All this leads to the more important refutation of the “mere process” canard that Giuliani and others assert. The most serious charge in the indictment is obstruction of justice, an accusation that usually results in the physical arrest of the defendant, contrary to the suggestions of Stone’s defenders that his arrest was heavy-handed. The indictment alleges that Stone obstructed investigations into Russian interference in the 2016 election by the (Republican-controlled) House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.


What Stone allegedly has done is throw sand in the gears of efforts by Congress to learn the extent of Russian interference in a U.S. election. The possibility that a foreign government conspired with a U.S. presidential campaign to sway an American election has been staring us in the face for two years. Congress has no greater public responsibility than fully investigating this nightmarish prospect and taking all steps to prevent its recurrence.

Efforts to undermine that imperative are sinister and serious, and anything but a “mere process” crime.

The writer teaches constitutional law at the University of California at San Diego and practices law at the firm Constantine Cannon. He was U.S. attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania from 1998 to 2001 and deputy assistant attorney general from 1993 to 1998.
Just because you never received a speeding ticket,... (show quote)


Yawn.....zzzzzzzzzz

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