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Sous-Vide
Sep 17, 2018 21:15:14   #
karpenter Loc: Headin' Fer Da Hills !!
 
There's An Appliance On The Market Called A Sous-Vide
https://anovaculinary.com/what-is-sous-vide/

The theory behind this, is that you can't Over/Under cook.
It's an appliance that heats and circulates water at a moderate temp. Set it at 140, put your meat in a Zip-Lock.
Leave it Four hrs., Eight hrs., Eight Days. The temp of your meat will never go over 140, Or Whatever Temp You Chose.
Therefore, it will never Over-Do. Home models run $125 - $200.

I Don't Have One. I'll Have To Improvise.

My wife buys Pork Loins, about 10# whole. It'll usually go into a crock-pot and cook slowly.
Unfortunately, I don't care for crock meats. I like baked, roasted, grilled. Pork loin is a very lean cut, and tends to get a little dry sometimes.

I cut this one about half for smoke & grill, another 4" section to pickle into Canadian Bacon or pork chops.
This gave me a 4# section to work with. My Wife Gets 1/2 for the meal she has planned.
I Dry Brine the meat. 1/2 Tsp per # is rule of thumb.
Rub it in, drop in a Zip-Lock for at least a couple hrs. But you can leave it over-nite if you want. It won't over-salt.
Can you tell yet, that I like the easy way of doing things...
So after it brines a bit, I mix my rub, apply it, drop it back in the Zip-Lock to marinade.

Now as I said, I don't have the Sous-Vide

What I did, was use a porcelain steel roaster filled with water. I brought it up to 140 in my electric oven.
I then turned the oven to it's lowest setting, and vented the door with a hot-pad to maintain 140 degree water temp.
I then vented the air from my bag of loin, and dropped it in the water. I let it cook for four hours.
Now, after it's cooked, you're supposed to drop the bag of meat into an ice-water bath to chill at least 1/2 hour.
While that was chilling, I got my Briquettes going. You'll set-up a Two Zone System. You'll want the fire fairly hot for the sear.
When you sear, keep turning the meat every couple minutes. It should brown, Not Burn.
Then move the meat away from the fire. Throw on some wood strips to smoke.
I close the lid and vents until the smoke stops, about 15min or so.
After the smoke, I wrap the meat tightly in foil. Leave it opposite the fire.
What we're trying to do here, is just heat the meat back up to my temp of 140.
That took 30min in this case. Use a digital read thermometer to check all your temps. The grocery store Dial ones can be way off.

I rested our roast for 25min.
It was still nice and warm when i sliced it. It was as tender & moist as I've ever had a pork loin.

The appliance for this may be handy, I don't know.
But this is probably how I might do large cuts of meat now.

(wonder what it would do for brisket ??)

| Reply
Sep 17, 2018 21:54:24   #
pafret Loc: Northeast
 
karpenter wrote:
There's An Appliance On The Market Called A Sous-Vide
https://anovaculinary.com/what-is-sous-vide/

The theory behind this, is that you can't Over/Under cook.
It's an appliance that heats and circulates water at a moderate temp. Set it at 140, put your meat in a Zip-Lock.
Leave it Four hrs., Eight hrs., Eight Days. The temp of your meat will never go over 140, Or Whatever Temp You Chose.
Therefore, it will never Over-Do. Home models run $125 - $200.

I Don't Have One. I'll Have To Improvise.

My wife buys Pork Loins, about 10# whole. It'll usually go into a crock-pot and cook slowly.
Unfortunately, I don't care for crock meats. I like baked, roasted, grilled. Pork loin is a very lean cut, and tends to get a little dry sometimes.

I cut this one about half for smoke & grill, another 4" section to pickle into Canadian Bacon or pork chops.
This gave me a 4# section to work with. My Wife Gets 1/2 for the meal she has planned.
I Dry Brine the meat. 1/2 Tsp per # is rule of thumb.
Rub it in, drop in a Zip-Lock for at least a couple hrs. But you can leave it over-nite if you want. It won't over-salt.
Can you tell yet, that I like the easy way of doing things...
So after it brines a bit, I mix my rub, apply it, drop it back in the Zip-Lock to marinade.

Now as I said, I don't have the Sous-Vide

What I did, was use a porcelain steel roaster filled with water. I brought it up to 140 in my electric oven.
I then turned the oven to it's lowest setting, and vented the door with a hot-pad to maintain 140 degree water temp.
I then vented the air from my bag of loin, and dropped it in the water. I let it cook for four hours.
Now, after it's cooked, you're supposed to drop the bag of meat into an ice-water bath to chill at least 1/2 hour.
While that was chilling, I got my Briquettes going. You'll set-up a Two Zone System. You'll want the fire fairly hot for the sear.
When you sear, keep turning the meat every couple minutes. It should brown, Not Burn.
Then move the meat away from the fire. Throw on some wood strips to smoke.
I close the lid and vents until the smoke stops, about 15min or so.
After the smoke, I wrap the meat tightly in foil. Leave it opposite the fire.
What we're trying to do here, is just heat the meat back up to my temp of 140.
That took 30min in this case. Use a digital read thermometer to check all your temps. The grocery store Dial ones can be way off.

I rested our roast for 25min.
It was still nice and warm when i sliced it. It was as tender & moist as I've ever had a pork loin.

The appliance for this may be handy, I don't know.
But this is probably how I might do large cuts of meat now.

(wonder what it would do for brisket ??)
There's An Appliance On The Market Called A Sous-V... (show quote)


I am prejudiced against cooking food in plastic films. Sous Vide cooking was all the rage a few years back on the Foodie shows but now it seems to have died off. I do pork loins as Canadian Bacon using a Wet Brine Cure with Prague Powder and Seasonings, and as pork roasts. I use conventional smokers, controlling the temperatures and the smoke to suit. I have found that simply brining any meat or poultry seems to increase moisture retention.

| Reply
Sep 17, 2018 22:05:46   #
karpenter Loc: Headin' Fer Da Hills !!
 
pafret wrote:
I do pork loins as Canadian Bacon using a Wet Brine Cure with Prague Powder and Seasonings
That's A Permeating Pickling Process
It Has To Be A Wet Cure
I Do Smaller Chunks Now
So I Don't Have To Inject Them Anymore
Quote:
I have found that simply brining any meat or poultry seems to increase moisture retention.
It Does, And Adds Flavor Too
I've Gotten Away From Wet Brines
I'm Not Real Big On Saltiness Anymore
The Wet Method Can Get Too Salty

I'm The Same With Rubs, Marinades & Seasonings
(I Concoct My Own Season Mixes Too)
Rubs Can Be Over Half Salt,
That Makes For A Terrible Gravy
So If A Rub Calls For A Cup Of Salt
Next Time I'll Use 1/4c Or Less
Maybe Just 1/2tsp Per #

| Reply
Sep 18, 2018 08:14:35   #
no propaganda please Loc: moon orbiting the third rock from the sun
 
karpenter wrote:
There's An Appliance On The Market Called A Sous-Vide
https://anovaculinary.com/what-is-sous-vide/

The theory behind this, is that you can't Over/Under cook.
It's an appliance that heats and circulates water at a moderate temp. Set it at 140, put your meat in a Zip-Lock.
Leave it Four hrs., Eight hrs., Eight Days. The temp of your meat will never go over 140, Or Whatever Temp You Chose.
Therefore, it will never Over-Do. Home models run $125 - $200.

I Don't Have One. I'll Have To Improvise.

My wife buys Pork Loins, about 10# whole. It'll usually go into a crock-pot and cook slowly.
Unfortunately, I don't care for crock meats. I like baked, roasted, grilled. Pork loin is a very lean cut, and tends to get a little dry sometimes.

I cut this one about half for smoke & grill, another 4" section to pickle into Canadian Bacon or pork chops.
This gave me a 4# section to work with. My Wife Gets 1/2 for the meal she has planned.
I Dry Brine the meat. 1/2 Tsp per # is rule of thumb.
Rub it in, drop in a Zip-Lock for at least a couple hrs. But you can leave it over-nite if you want. It won't over-salt.
Can you tell yet, that I like the easy way of doing things...
So after it brines a bit, I mix my rub, apply it, drop it back in the Zip-Lock to marinade.

Now as I said, I don't have the Sous-Vide

What I did, was use a porcelain steel roaster filled with water. I brought it up to 140 in my electric oven.
I then turned the oven to it's lowest setting, and vented the door with a hot-pad to maintain 140 degree water temp.
I then vented the air from my bag of loin, and dropped it in the water. I let it cook for four hours.
Now, after it's cooked, you're supposed to drop the bag of meat into an ice-water bath to chill at least 1/2 hour.
While that was chilling, I got my Briquettes going. You'll set-up a Two Zone System. You'll want the fire fairly hot for the sear.
When you sear, keep turning the meat every couple minutes. It should brown, Not Burn.
Then move the meat away from the fire. Throw on some wood strips to smoke.
I close the lid and vents until the smoke stops, about 15min or so.
After the smoke, I wrap the meat tightly in foil. Leave it opposite the fire.
What we're trying to do here, is just heat the meat back up to my temp of 140.
That took 30min in this case. Use a digital read thermometer to check all your temps. The grocery store Dial ones can be way off.

I rested our roast for 25min.
It was still nice and warm when i sliced it. It was as tender & moist as I've ever had a pork loin.

The appliance for this may be handy, I don't know.
But this is probably how I might do large cuts of meat now.

(wonder what it would do for brisket ??)
There's An Appliance On The Market Called A Sous-V... (show quote)


We use a crock pot and a device that controls the temperature and plugs into the crock pot and takes over temperature control. For instance we use 137 degrees for steak. When the crock pot gets to 137 it stays there. At that time we put the steak in, and note the time so we can make sure we leave it in that long. Extra time does no harm. Google Sous-Vide and get a good book. Almost any meat can be cooked that way but it is really great for tough but flavorful cuts of beef, or game meat. I think we use it for about of our meat cooking, things we don't fry or saute.

| Reply
Sep 18, 2018 15:09:07   #
karpenter Loc: Headin' Fer Da Hills !!
 
no propaganda please wrote:
Almost any meat can be cooked that way but it is really great for tough but flavorful cuts of beef, or game meat.
I Don't See That I'll Make A Habit Of It
My Wife Is The Crocker.
I Don't Care Much To Cook A Pork Loin In A Crock.
Maybe I'll Do A Pot Roast Stew...
Now I'm Getting Hungry

I Might Try My Version Of Sous-Vide
On A Brisket Before My Season Is Up
170 Is A Little Higher Temp Than I Like My Beef
But The Experts Expect A Temp Range Of 180 - 200

I Might Venture Out On A Beef Rib Too
Some Folks Want To Boil Them Up-Front
I Look At All The Oil And Color In The Water
And Think:
'That Used To Be Flavor'
-- And You Can't Put It Back In

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