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This is a true story, so read it carefully.
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Feb 11, 2018 10:57:18   #
cold iron (a regular here)
 
This is a true story, so read it carefully.

I stopped at a BP gas station in GA. My truck's gas gauge was on 1/4 of a tank. I use the mid-grade, which was priced at $3.71 per gallon. When my tank is at this point, it takes somewhere around 14 gallons to fill When the pump showed 14 gallons had been pumped, I began to slow it down. Then, to my surprise, it went to 15, then 16. I even looked under my truck to see if it was being spilled It was not.

Then it showed 17 gallons on the pump. It stopped at 18 gallons. This was very strange to me, since my truck has only an 18 gallon tank I went on my way a little confused, then on the evening news I heard a report that 1 out of 4 gas stations had calibrated their pumps to show more gas had been pumped than a person actually got.

Here is how to check a pump to see if you are getting the right amount:

Whichever grade you are using, put EXACTLY 1 (one) GALLON in your tank, then look at the dollar amount. If the dollar amount is not EXACTLY the price of the fuel PRICE ADVERTISED, then the pumps are rigged.

In my case, as I said, the mid-grade was $3.71 per gallon; my dollar amount or 1 gallons should have been $3.71.

I wish I had checked the pump. It doesn't matter where you pump gas, please check the 1 gallon price. If you do find a station that is cheating, contact the state Agriculture Department, and direct your comments to the Commissioner, the info is on the gas pumps.
 
Feb 11, 2018 11:11:24   #
slatten49 (a regular here)
 
Thanks, Cold iron, for the head's-up
Feb 11, 2018 11:19:14   #
debeda (a regular here)
 
cold iron wrote:
This is a true story, so read it carefully.

I stopped at a BP gas station in GA. My truck's gas gauge was on 1/4 of a tank. I use the mid-grade, which was priced at $3.71 per gallon. When my tank is at this point, it takes somewhere around 14 gallons to fill When the pump showed 14 gallons had been pumped, I began to slow it down. Then, to my surprise, it went to 15, then 16. I even looked under my truck to see if it was being spilled It was not.

Then it showed 17 gallons on the pump. It stopped at 18 gallons. This was very strange to me, since my truck has only an 18 gallon tank I went on my way a little confused, then on the evening news I heard a report that 1 out of 4 gas stations had calibrated their pumps to show more gas had been pumped than a person actually got.

Here is how to check a pump to see if you are getting the right amount:

Whichever grade you are using, put EXACTLY 1 (one) GALLON in your tank, then look at the dollar amount. If the dollar amount is not EXACTLY the price of the fuel PRICE ADVERTISED, then the pumps are rigged.

In my case, as I said, the mid-grade was $3.71 per gallon; my dollar amount or 1 gallons should have been $3.71.

I wish I had checked the pump. It doesn't matter where you pump gas, please check the 1 gallon price. If you do find a station that is cheating, contact the state Agriculture Department, and direct your comments to the Commissioner, the info is on the gas pumps.
This is a true story, so read it carefully. br b... (show quote)


Thanks for the warning!!! I have noticed from time to time that I don't seem to get as much gas as I pay for, this is probably the explanation!
Feb 11, 2018 11:41:41   #
SGM B
 
debeda wrote:
Thanks for the warning!!! I have noticed from time to time that I don't seem to get as much gas as I pay for, this is probably the explanation!


I too have noticed this, usually at SAMs Club, my F150 will normally go close to 100 miles before the gas gauge comes off Full, but with a fill up at SAMs it's closer to 70 miles. Not saying SAMs is cheating customers - maybe I'm just not getting it as full there. Thanks for the info, I will check to make sure at next fill up.
SGM B out.
Feb 11, 2018 11:52:48   #
archie bunker (a regular here)
 
This is good to know. Another thing to watch for is when you activate the pump if the dollar amount starts ticking before any gas is pumped. I noticed this at a place where I frequently got gas once. When I turned the pump on, it instantly went to 6 cents, and slowly kept ticking up without pumping any gas. I had the reset the pump, and it kept doing it. The employees just shrugged their shoulders, so I had my wife call the owner of the store (who she knows) and tell her. They got it fixed, but it's something to watch for.
Feb 11, 2018 12:07:04   #
Kevyn (a regular here)
 
cold iron wrote:
This is a true story, so read it carefully.

I stopped at a BP gas station in GA. My truck's gas gauge was on 1/4 of a tank. I use the mid-grade, which was priced at $3.71 per gallon. When my tank is at this point, it takes somewhere around 14 gallons to fill When the pump showed 14 gallons had been pumped, I began to slow it down. Then, to my surprise, it went to 15, then 16. I even looked under my truck to see if it was being spilled It was not.

Then it showed 17 gallons on the pump. It stopped at 18 gallons. This was very strange to me, since my truck has only an 18 gallon tank I went on my way a little confused, then on the evening news I heard a report that 1 out of 4 gas stations had calibrated their pumps to show more gas had been pumped than a person actually got.

Here is how to check a pump to see if you are getting the right amount:

Whichever grade you are using, put EXACTLY 1 (one) GALLON in your tank, then look at the dollar amount. If the dollar amount is not EXACTLY the price of the fuel PRICE ADVERTISED, then the pumps are rigged.

In my case, as I said, the mid-grade was $3.71 per gallon; my dollar amount or 1 gallons should have been $3.71.

I wish I had checked the pump. It doesn't matter where you pump gas, please check the 1 gallon price. If you do find a station that is cheating, contact the state Agriculture Department, and direct your comments to the Commissioner, the info is on the gas pumps.
This is a true story, so read it carefully. br b... (show quote)
Contact the division of weights and measures and request they do an audit on the station. In most states they will have a sticker on gas pumps most states require accurate calibration. If they measure the accuracy of the pump and the station is rigging the things they face a huge fine.
 
Feb 12, 2018 06:18:23   #
Dr. Evil (a regular here)
 
cold iron wrote:
This is a true story, so read it carefully.

I stopped at a BP gas station in GA. My truck's gas gauge was on 1/4 of a tank. I use the mid-grade, which was priced at $3.71 per gallon. When my tank is at this point, it takes somewhere around 14 gallons to fill When the pump showed 14 gallons had been pumped, I began to slow it down. Then, to my surprise, it went to 15, then 16. I even looked under my truck to see if it was being spilled It was not.

Then it showed 17 gallons on the pump. It stopped at 18 gallons. This was very strange to me, since my truck has only an 18 gallon tank I went on my way a little confused, then on the evening news I heard a report that 1 out of 4 gas stations had calibrated their pumps to show more gas had been pumped than a person actually got.

Here is how to check a pump to see if you are getting the right amount:

Whichever grade you are using, put EXACTLY 1 (one) GALLON in your tank, then look at the dollar amount. If the dollar amount is not EXACTLY the price of the fuel PRICE ADVERTISED, then the pumps are rigged.

In my case, as I said, the mid-grade was $3.71 per gallon; my dollar amount or 1 gallons should have been $3.71.

I wish I had checked the pump. It doesn't matter where you pump gas, please check the 1 gallon price. If you do find a station that is cheating, contact the state Agriculture Department, and direct your comments to the Commissioner, the info is on the gas pumps.
This is a true story, so read it carefully. br b... (show quote)


Why didn't you divide the gallons by the price u paid, then u would at least know, or did u when u got home?
Feb 12, 2018 09:03:08   #
Happishark
 
cold iron wrote:
This is a true story, so read it carefully.

I stopped at a BP gas station in GA. My truck's gas gauge was on 1/4 of a tank. I use the mid-grade, which was priced at $3.71 per gallon. When my tank is at this point, it takes somewhere around 14 gallons to fill When the pump showed 14 gallons had been pumped, I began to slow it down. Then, to my surprise, it went to 15, then 16. I even looked under my truck to see if it was being spilled It was not.

Then it showed 17 gallons on the pump. It stopped at 18 gallons. This was very strange to me, since my truck has only an 18 gallon tank I went on my way a little confused, then on the evening news I heard a report that 1 out of 4 gas stations had calibrated their pumps to show more gas had been pumped than a person actually got.

Here is how to check a pump to see if you are getting the right amount:

Whichever grade you are using, put EXACTLY 1 (one) GALLON in your tank, then look at the dollar amount. If the dollar amount is not EXACTLY the price of the fuel PRICE ADVERTISED, then the pumps are rigged.

In my case, as I said, the mid-grade was $3.71 per gallon; my dollar amount or 1 gallons should have been $3.71.

I wish I had checked the pump. It doesn't matter where you pump gas, please check the 1 gallon price. If you do find a station that is cheating, contact the state Agriculture Department, and direct your comments to the Commissioner, the info is on the gas pumps.
This is a true story, so read it carefully. br b... (show quote)


I'm sorry you got ripped off, and I can easily believe that rigging the pumps is a fairly common practice. I don't think the method you suggest for checking the pump would be very helpful in exposing the cheat, though. If I am advertising gas at $3.71/gal but actually giving you, say, 9/10 of a gallon for $3.71, my pump is going to be rigged to read $3.71 and 1 gal when 9/10 of a gal has been pumped. So when you stop the pump at exactly 1 gal, the $ read-out will be $3.71, even though there's only 9/10 of a gal in your tank.
Feb 12, 2018 09:13:34   #
cold iron (a regular here)
 
Happishark wrote:
I'm sorry you got ripped off, and I can easily believe that rigging the pumps is a fairly common practice. I don't think the method you suggest for checking the pump would be very helpful in exposing the cheat, though. If I am advertising gas at $3.71/gal but actually giving you, say, 9/10 of a gallon for $3.71, my pump is going to be rigged to read $3.71 and 1 gal when 9/10 of a gal has been pumped. So when you stop the pump at exactly 1 gal, the $ read-out will be $3.71, even though there's only 9/10 of a gal in your tank.
I'm sorry you got ripped off, and I can easily bel... (show quote)


That is a possibility, sadly.
Feb 12, 2018 11:09:07   #
ldsuttonjr (a regular here)
 
cold iron wrote:
This is a true story, so read it carefully.

I stopped at a BP gas station in GA. My truck's gas gauge was on 1/4 of a tank. I use the mid-grade, which was priced at $3.71 per gallon. When my tank is at this point, it takes somewhere around 14 gallons to fill When the pump showed 14 gallons had been pumped, I began to slow it down. Then, to my surprise, it went to 15, then 16. I even looked under my truck to see if it was being spilled It was not.

Then it showed 17 gallons on the pump. It stopped at 18 gallons. This was very strange to me, since my truck has only an 18 gallon tank I went on my way a little confused, then on the evening news I heard a report that 1 out of 4 gas stations had calibrated their pumps to show more gas had been pumped than a person actually got.

Here is how to check a pump to see if you are getting the right amount:

Whichever grade you are using, put EXACTLY 1 (one) GALLON in your tank, then look at the dollar amount. If the dollar amount is not EXACTLY the price of the fuel PRICE ADVERTISED, then the pumps are rigged.

In my case, as I said, the mid-grade was $3.71 per gallon; my dollar amount or 1 gallons should have been $3.71.

I wish I had checked the pump. It doesn't matter where you pump gas, please check the 1 gallon price. If you do find a station that is cheating, contact the state Agriculture Department, and direct your comments to the Commissioner, the info is on the gas pumps.
This is a true story, so read it carefully. br b... (show quote)


cold iron: I try to fill up on cold days....the specific gravity of the fuel per gallon is much more dense than warmer temps! Even in the summer, filling up in the evening can save you money!
Feb 12, 2018 11:15:15   #
Mike Easterday (a regular here)
 
Good to know . Thanks!
 
Feb 12, 2018 12:20:07   #
woodguru (a regular here)
 
cold iron wrote:
This is a true story, so read it carefully.

Whichever grade you are using, put EXACTLY 1 (one) GALLON in your tank, then look at the dollar amount. If the dollar amount is not EXACTLY the price of the fuel PRICE ADVERTISED, then the pumps are rigged.

In my case, as I said, the mid-grade was $3.71 per gallon; my dollar amount or 1 gallons should have been $3.71.



Sorry, but pumping exactly what shows as one gallon is going to tell you nothing. If the pump is set for $3.71 for a gallon and you pump one gallon the amount charged is going to be $3.71. If the calibration is off you will have pumped less than the gallon the pump says you did, but you will be paying for the gallon it says you pumped that you didn't.

The only way you could tell would be to have an accurately calibrated can such as a five gallon plastic can. Use a larger cup measure like 4 cups and measure a true five gallons in it, chances are the mark on the container that says five gallons will be fairly accurate, you could just go by that. Now pump what shows as an exact five gallons and see how much gas is in the can.

Miscalibrated pumps don't have to be off by much, not enough to really notice on a tank of gas, but over hundreds of thousands of gallons even a teaspoon per gallon off would make a large difference.
Feb 12, 2018 12:25:03   #
woodguru (a regular here)
 
2wheeljunkie wrote:
Why didn't you divide the gallons by the price u paid, then u would at least know, or did u when u got home?


See my post, whatever the pump says you pumped even if it's wrong is the number used by the computer to calculate the price per gallon against that number, there will not be a difference because the pump doesn't know anything but the gallons it thinks it pumped. There is no other "real" number for there to be a different price.
Feb 12, 2018 12:30:44   #
woodguru (a regular here)
 
debeda wrote:
Thanks for the warning!!! I have noticed from time to time that I don't seem to get as much gas as I pay for, this is probably the explanation!


More likely is the fume recovery system, they can "take back" more than fumes if you don't have the right angle going into the tank.

Years ago I noticed at times more being pumped than the tank should be able to hold. You put just the tip of the nozzle into the hole, and pull the spring that forces you to have the nozzle in deeper, and nothing is taken back through the pump nozzle, it's a pain in the butt but I notice that what seems to be a more realistic amount of gas fills the tank.
Feb 12, 2018 15:09:21   #
bggamers (a regular here)
 
cold iron wrote:
This is a true story, so read it carefully.

I stopped at a BP gas station in GA. My truck's gas gauge was on 1/4 of a tank. I use the mid-grade, which was priced at $3.71 per gallon. When my tank is at this point, it takes somewhere around 14 gallons to fill When the pump showed 14 gallons had been pumped, I began to slow it down. Then, to my surprise, it went to 15, then 16. I even looked under my truck to see if it was being spilled It was not.

Then it showed 17 gallons on the pump. It stopped at 18 gallons. This was very strange to me, since my truck has only an 18 gallon tank I went on my way a little confused, then on the evening news I heard a report that 1 out of 4 gas stations had calibrated their pumps to show more gas had been pumped than a person actually got.

Here is how to check a pump to see if you are getting the right amount:

Whichever grade you are using, put EXACTLY 1 (one) GALLON in your tank, then look at the dollar amount. If the dollar amount is not EXACTLY the price of the fuel PRICE ADVERTISED, then the pumps are rigged.

In my case, as I said, the mid-grade was $3.71 per gallon; my dollar amount or 1 gallons should have been $3.71.

I wish I had checked the pump. It doesn't matter where you pump gas, please check the 1 gallon price. If you do find a station that is cheating, contact the state Agriculture Department, and direct your comments to the Commissioner, the info is on the gas pumps.
This is a true story, so read it carefully. br b... (show quote)

Good to know thanks
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