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Wedding Band?
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Jan 4, 2014 14:24:54   #
AuntiE Loc: 46th Least Free State
 
A topic of interest for me as a family member and I have had discussions on the matter.

Should a man wear a wedding band?

If yes, why?

If no, why?

The same question for a woman.

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Jan 4, 2014 15:00:24   #
Loki Loc: Georgia
 
AuntiE wrote:
A topic of interest for me as a family member and I have had discussions on the matter.

Should a man wear a wedding band?

If yes, why?

If no, why?

The same question for a woman.


I wear mine out of respect for the institution. Not to mention for my wife who has gone 27 years and change without killing me.

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Jan 4, 2014 15:04:21   #
emarine
 
AuntiE wrote:
A topic of interest for me as a family member and I have had discussions on the matter.

Should a man wear a wedding band?

If yes, why?

If no, why?

The same question for a woman.


Interesting question... I think it is proper to wear one... reasoning is it proves ones availability without speech, however for people who use their hands its very unpractical, I smashed mine several times years ago and had to cut it off my finger. I wear no jewelry at all.. not even a watch for the same reason.

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Jan 4, 2014 15:15:50   #
Peaver Bogart Loc: Montana
 
AuntiE wrote:
A topic of interest for me as a family member and I have had discussions on the matter.

Should a man wear a wedding band?

If yes, why?

If no, why?

The same question for a woman.


Hi AuntiE, I'm all for wearing a wedding band for men as well as women. I've been wearing mine for over 50 years. (same ring, same woman) If I remember correctley, the preacher said the wedding band was a symbol of a neverending love. As in "till death do us part".

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Jan 4, 2014 15:19:43   #
PoppaGringo Loc: Muslim City, Mexifornia, B.R.
 
AuntiE wrote:
A topic of interest for me as a family member and I have had discussions on the matter.

Should a man wear a wedding band?

If yes, why?

If no, why?

The same question for a woman.


I had to quit wearing mine because I kept shorting out computers while checking them out, or repairing them. I then put it on my key ring. My wife understood why I could no longer wear it, and concurred as to my reasoning for doing so. No one ever doubted I was married, and happily so.

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Jan 4, 2014 15:20:33   #
RetNavyCWO Loc: VA suburb of DC
 
AuntiE wrote:
A topic of interest for me as a family member and I have had discussions on the matter.

Should a man wear a wedding band?

If yes, why?

If no, why?

The same question for a woman.


Since the wearing of a wedding band or ring is a recognized method in our society of announcing to others whether one is single or involved in a committed, loving relationship, I would say that both men and women should wear wedding bands/rings. I can understand an opposing viewpoint that one's love life need not be announced to anyone - let the rest of society perceive an individual based upon the individual's actions rather than on whether the individual is involved in a committed relationship. To that I would say that more information about a person is better than less if we are going to interact with that person. If a person is wearing a wedding band/ring, we know with some degree of certainty that the person is probably married. If a person is not wearing a wedding band/ring, we don't know one way or the other, but we would probably assume the person to be single...which could be problematic depending on the circumstances.

For example, if a woman who is not wearing a wedding band or ring makes a flirtatious gesture or comment to me, I would, more than likely, assume she has a romantic interest in me and respond accordingly (whether positively or negatively). If the same woman is wearing a wedding band or ring and makes the same gesture or comment, I would probably think she was just being nice. I might still think she was interested, but she would have shot herself in the foot because I would never date a married woman.

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Jan 4, 2014 16:04:23   #
Searching Loc: Rural Southwest VA
 
RetNavyCWO wrote:
Since the wearing of a wedding band or ring is a recognized method in our society of announcing to others whether one is single or involved in a committed, loving relationship, I would say that both men and women should wear wedding bands/rings. I can understand an opposing viewpoint that one's love life need not be announced to anyone - let the rest of society perceive an individual based upon the individual's actions rather than on whether the individual is involved in a committed relationship. To that I would say that more information about a person is better than less if we are going to interact with that person. If a person is wearing a wedding band/ring, we know with some degree of certainty that the person is probably married. If a person is not wearing a wedding band/ring, we don't know one way or the other, but we would probably assume the person to be single...which could be problematic depending on the circumstances.

For example, if a woman who is not wearing a wedding band or ring makes a flirtatious gesture or comment to me, I would, more than likely, assume she has a romantic interest in me and respond accordingly (whether positively or negatively). If the same woman is wearing a wedding band or ring and makes the same gesture or comment, I would probably think she was just being nice. I might still think she was interested, but she would have shot herself in the foot because I would never date a married woman.
Since the wearing of a wedding band or ring is a r... (show quote)


:thumbup: :thumbup: That says it all.

As a side note, I wear my ring all the time, never take it off. My husband only takes his off if he is working with power tools. Quite honestly, I wouldn't be disturbed if he didn't wear it, because I know that while there are women out there who would hit on him (and have), the likelihood of him responding back is between zero and none. My response to someone who refuses to acknowledge my status is to wave the ringed hand in the air and just say "there's a reason I wear this." They usually walk.

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Jan 4, 2014 16:07:23   #
AuntiE Loc: 46th Least Free State
 
banjojack wrote:
I wear mine out of respect for the institution. Not to mention for my wife who has gone 27 years and change without killing me.


There is still time for Mrs. Banjojack to rectify your death. :lol: :roll:

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Jan 4, 2014 16:09:06   #
Loki Loc: Georgia
 
AuntiE wrote:
There is still time for Mrs. Banjojack to rectify your death. :lol: :roll:


It should be easy, as you have already wounded me. Boo. Hoo.

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Jan 4, 2014 16:18:02   #
AuntiE Loc: 46th Least Free State
 
Searching wrote:
:thumbup: :thumbup: That says it all.

As a side note, I wear my ring all the time, never take it off. My husband only takes his off if he is working with power tools. Quite honestly, I wouldn't be disturbed if he didn't wear it, because I know that while there are women out there who would hit on him (and have), the likelihood of him responding back is between zero and none. My response to someone who refuses to acknowledge my status is to wave the ringed hand in the air and just say "there's a reason I wear this." They usually walk.
:thumbup: :thumbup: That says it all. br br A... (show quote)


This seems the appropriate place to put this story relating to husbands and rings.

A VERY few days before our marriage my future (and still ) husband called inquiring as to whether his ring would match mine. I was speechless. I responded with, "Have you seen a single ring on a single spouse in my family?" He was then speechless. Being a less gentle person back then, I told him should he want a ring to obtain such. Due to issues with his hands, he no longer wears it.

There is more to my philosophy on this matter; however, I think I will await further commentary before bringing it forth.

I find it interesting you are the only female to respond on the subject.

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Jan 4, 2014 16:20:18   #
AuntiE Loc: 46th Least Free State
 
banjojack wrote:
It should be easy, as you have already wounded me. Boo. Hoo.


It will not be my fault. It will either be the dogs or the truck or combination thereof. I will travel to attend the services, wear my black suit and speak kind words to everyone about you and the sense of loss. :-D

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Jan 4, 2014 16:28:35   #
Ve'hoe
 
Yes, if you want to stay married..

And you wear it cause you made an oath before god......
AuntiE wrote:
A topic of interest for me as a family member and I have had discussions on the matter.

Should a man wear a wedding band?

If yes, why?

If no, why?

The same question for a woman.

| Reply
Jan 4, 2014 16:34:04   #
AuntiE Loc: 46th Least Free State
 
Ve'hoe wrote:
Yes, if you want to stay married..

And you wear it cause you made an oath before god......


Why would the not wearing of a ring prevent an individual from remaining married?

Did your oath before God require a ring?

I truly am not trying to be arbitrary.

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Jan 4, 2014 17:04:48   #
slatten49 Loc: Lake Whitney, Texas
 
I wear mine to astound people with the fact that someone would have me. :mrgreen:

Also, it is a standing order, with the Sgt. Major, that I wear it out of respect for both her and our marriage.

Since removing it would, most likely, spell my death :shock:, I wear it at all times. :thumbup:

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Jan 4, 2014 17:16:20   #
AuntiE Loc: 46th Least Free State
 
I thought I would add this piece of information to the discussion.

The History Of The Wedding Ring


The use of the wedding ring as a symbol of the bond between husband and wife is familiar to us as the concept of marriage itself, but from where did this interesting tradition emerge? The history of wedding rings as they are known today is actually unclear. In an article dating from the July 1869 issue of Appleton’s Journal of popular Literature, Science, and Art, Edward J. Wood hypothesizes that the modern (modern as of 1869) use of wedding rings stems from the practices of ancient Hebrews. It was customary for the family of a prospective groom to give gifts to the potential bride and her family. The general assumption is that it is from this tradition that the use of wedding rings as we know them seems to have evolved.

Wedding rings are not specifically mentioned in the Bible, but references do exist that suggest the aforementioned Hebrew practices. Genesis 24:53 in the King James Version reads, “And the servant brought forth jewels of silver, and jewels of gold, and raiment, and gave them to Rebekah: he gave also to her brother and to her mother precious things,” speaking of the servant of Abraham, the father of Isaac, who was to wed Rebekah. The wedding ring first came into use in Christian wedding ceremonies around 870 A.D.

The tradition of wearing a wedding ring on the fourth finger of the left hand also comes from the ancients. In ancient Greece it was believed that an artery from that particular finger led directly to the heart. While we now know this is pure mythology, it does serve as a rather romantic explanation for the tradition.

Although the concept of the wedding ring is obviously very old, the ring was almost always worn by the bride. Double-ring wedding ceremonies are rather new. Wedding rings for men were almost unheard of before 1940 and increased in use about the time of the Second World War. According to an October 1953 story in Hobbies, only about 15% of wedding ceremonies included a ring for the groom. After the start of World War II, the percentage jumped to 60%, and then to 70% after the start of the Korean war. Today it is more common than not for grooms and brides alike to wear a wedding ring.

So, why a wedding ring, as opposed to, say, a wedding bracelet or necklace? Religious ceremonies usually include a mention by the officiating clergyman of the ring’s unending circle being representative of both God’s perfect love for humanity and the marrying couple’s undivided devotion to one another.

While the precise origin of the wedding ring is unclear and lost to history, today we recognize the wedding ring as a symbol of the unity of marriage. The couples of today also generally choose their wedding rings together, thus adding to the personal symbolism that the jewelry carries for them. Additionally, the wedding ring serves as a social symbol in today’s world, signifying to others that this man or woman is “spoken for.”

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