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Aug 18, 2013 21:31:57   #
TheCracker
 
This is quite simple if you think about it, but realize I am not only looking for the correct answer, I am wanting you to provide your equations to solve it, -- and -- quote the originator of the mathematical theory.

It is a warm and windless day. Two cars are backed up to each other, rear bumpers touching. In front of both is a flat road.

At the same time they both start driving away from each other at a speed of fifty miles per hour.

In one half hour, they both stop, make a left turn onto another road and continue on at a speed of fifty miles per hour.

At the end of another half hour they both stop at the same time.

NOW for the question.

How apart (as the crow flies) in a straight line, are they, and what formula did you use to calculate it ?

Ps. This would be a typical question found on a IQ exam.

Now for phase II. Which can come up with the answer first. A liberal who will try and feel their way through it, or a conservative who will try and think their way to the answer.

Let the race begin.

Your math please? :?:

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Aug 18, 2013 23:01:47   #
justkillingtime
 
TheCracker wrote:
At the same time they both start driving away from each other at a speed of fifty miles per hour.


Not possible. Even the fastest moving object possible will have an acceleration time even if it is measured in milliseconds. It will take time for the cars to go from 0 mph to 50 mph. You measure the distance traveled and use that to determine their speed (with a physics equation I no longer remember), not the other way around.

Quote:
In one half hour, they both stop,


Meaning they have each gone 25 miles (ignoring the acceleration time) from their starting point and are now 50 miles apart.

Quote:
make a left turn onto another road and continue on at a speed of fifty miles per hour.

At the end of another half hour they both stop at the same time.


Meaning they are still 50 miles apart. But they are not each 50 miles from their starting point since you are talking about their displacement, which is a vector quantity. You would use the Pythagorean Theorem (A-squared + B-squared = C-squared) to calculate their distance from their starting point (which isn’t necessarily the total distance they have traveled since a vector is always a single straight line from the starting point to the ending point).

So you have a right triangle with sides of 25 miles and the hypotenuse representing C-squared or the distance from the starting point.

(25 x 25) + (25 x 25) = C-squared.

625 + 625 = 1250 = C-squared

C = the square root of 1250 or 35 (actually 35.35533906, but you have only 2 significant figures, i.e., the measured quantity of 25 has only 2 SF).

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Aug 19, 2013 00:26:05   #
saloopo
 
I think just killing time only has half the equation, Solving for the hypotenuse of only one right triangle. Since there were two cars, there are two 25mi x 25mi right triangles. The correct distance should be 2C (2 x 35.355) or 70.7106 miles apart.

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Aug 19, 2013 07:18:52   #
justkillingtime
 
The distance between the 2 vehicles is not the same thing as the distance from their starting point. Each vehicle would have its own vector displacement. If the travel speed is the same the final distance between the vehicles would be double their displacement.

I see now what you are talking about though. When the 2 vehicles made their left turn they did not turn in the same direction because they were not facing the same direction when they made the turn. I assumed that they both went in the same direction after the turn so they were traveling parallel to each other. But it was too late at night and I had spent part of the day working in my garden on top of having blood pressure problems that mean I am half asleep most of the time to realize how the situation was set up.

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Aug 19, 2013 09:05:24   #
TheCracker
 
OK. Let's jump to some simple physics, shall we?

Title next post will be. How does it float, and what causes it.

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Aug 19, 2013 14:17:46   #
bottomdawg
 
70,70 miles.bottomdawg is not a conservative or liveral.
He is a pragmatist.

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Aug 19, 2013 22:19:18   #
TheCracker
 
Who was the last presidential candidate for the pragmatist party?

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Aug 20, 2013 10:26:42   #
bottomdawg
 
It was Captain John Smith at the Jamestown, VA settlement. He said, "You
don't work; you don't eat". Pragmatism is using what you got to do what
needs to be done. The country was built on it. It isn't a party, it's a way of
thinking. It may be hard to find today, but it's still around. It is easiest to
find when you need it the most.

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Aug 20, 2013 16:25:20   #
oldroy
 
TheCracker wrote:
This is quite simple if you think about it, but realize I am not only looking for the correct answer, I am wanting you to provide your equations to solve it, -- and -- quote the originator of the mathematical theory.

It is a warm and windless day. Two cars are backed up to each other, rear bumpers touching. In front of both is a flat road.

At the same time they both start driving away from each other at a speed of fifty miles per hour.

In one half hour, they both stop, make a left turn onto another road and continue on at a speed of fifty miles per hour.

At the end of another half hour they both stop at the same time.

NOW for the question.

How apart (as the crow flies) in a straight line, are they, and what formula did you use to calculate it ?

Ps. This would be a typical question found on a IQ exam.

Now for phase II. Which can come up with the answer first. A liberal who will try and feel their way through it, or a conservative who will try and think their way to the answer.

Let the race begin.

Your math please? :?:
This is quite simple if you think about it, but re... (show quote)


what kind of IQ test would we find this on? I say that because most people who use that measurement know you can't accurately measure it past about 9 or 10 and most kids that young couldn't solve without a calculator since they don't usually know that kind of math yet.

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Aug 20, 2013 18:34:01   #
justkillingtime
 
bottomdawg wrote:
It was Captain John Smith at the Jamestown, VA settlement. He said, "You
don't work; you don't eat". Pragmatism is using what you got to do what
needs to be done. The country was built on it. It isn't a party, it's a way of
thinking. It may be hard to find today, but it's still around. It is easiest to
find when you need it the most.


It’s actually a myth that Jamestown was settled by gentlemen who were not used to hard physical labor and thus refused to do it.

It’s also a myth that the colony was set up just to find gold. Within a month or so of landing the colonists found some fool’s gold and when this was taken back to England and found to be fool’s gold the Colony’s original leader, Christopher Newport, became obsessed with finding real gold because he had made a bunch of promises to the Virginia Company. The gold fever was somewhat infectious, but it didn’t last very long.

Furthermore the Colony’s initial starvation was due to a prolonged and historically severe drought. The Indians were starving as well so they couldn’t supply the Colony with as much food as the Virginia Company had planned on. The initial colonists were also blown off course while crossing the ocean and thus landed after it was too late in the year to plant corn.

There is also a theory that says one of the colonists was a Roman Catholic secret agent working for Spain who used arsenic to poison people anytime the Colony’s ships left for England to get supplies. The sickness caused by the poisoning would have cut the Colony’s labor force.

And don’t forget that Smith was an explorer and adventurer. Even when he was president of the Colony’s governing council Smith spent much of his time exploring the countryside instead of administering the Colony.

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Aug 21, 2013 12:26:38   #
bottomdawg
 
You've been set up. capt Smith was always an adventurer.
the Virginia Company was set up in London, and recruited
settlers from the city folk.The London of the early seventeenth century was not an easy place to live. by today's
standards, they were very hardy people. the London of the
early 17th century was also very disease-ridden. When the
settlers got malaria in the jamestown swamps, they probably
felt at home

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Aug 21, 2013 18:21:56   #
justkillingtime
 
bottomdawg wrote:
You've been set up. capt Smith was always an adventurer.
the Virginia Company was set up in London, and recruited
settlers from the city folk.The London of the early seventeenth century was not an easy place to live. by today's
standards, they were very hardy people. the London of the
early 17th century was also very disease-ridden. When the
settlers got malaria in the jamestown swamps, they probably
felt at home


http://www.amazon.com/Savage-Kingdom-Jamestown-Settlement-America/dp/006009057X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1377123196&sr=8-1&keywords=savage+kingdom

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