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Feb 12, 2024 21:26:02   #
dtucker300 Loc: Vista, CA
 
'Will only increase the probability of failure'
By Bob Unruh
Published February 12, 2024 at 1:20pm

If all of the existing headaches for those pushing expensive electric vehicles on resisting American consumers could vanish, there's still a big one that may have no ready solution.

Already, it appears the U.S. could end up dependent on unfriendly nations for materials for all those batteries. Then there's the fact that the nation's grid simply can't support all that recharging – California already has been sending out advisories for owners not to charge. And then there's the limited range, extended recharging times, both worsened by bad weather.

But now a report in the Washington Times explains that those batteries are heavy, and EVs can weight up to 50% more than internal combustion motor vehicles.

And that weight damages roads, bridges and parking garages, with those vehicles easily plowing through safety guardrails while posing a higher danger to other drivers, pedestrians and bicyclists traveling the same routes.

"The problems associated with EVs are poised to grow as more consumers purchase the cars under the Biden administration’s plan to eliminate gas-powered vehicles and the tailpipe emissions that come with them," the report explained.

It explained engineers writing recently for Structure Magazine suggested construction companies, and building codes, need to make accommodations for the higher weight.

Parking garages, they said, should be redesigned to hold more weight.

That's because some hold hundreds of vehicles, and just one EV. A Ford truck weighs in at 8,240 pounds, nearly a ton more than the gas-powered version of the same pickup.

"Significantly increasing passenger vehicle weights combined with recently reduced structural design requirements will result in reduced factors of safety and increased maintenance and repair costs for parking structures," the engineers wrote. "There are many cases of parking structure failures, and the growing demand for EVs will only increase the probability of failure."

Then there are those guardrails, installed to minimize damage when traffic goes awry.

They are installed between lanes for traffic moving in opposite directions, between lanes and edge drop-offs and more.

That concern comes out of a procedure at a test facility in Nebraska, where examiners took a 3.6-ton Rivian R1 and sent it into a metal guardrail at 62 mph, first head-on, then at an angle.

Both times it "ripped through" the guardrail and continued into what would have been lanes for oncoming traffic, the report revealed.

The conclusion was simple: making vehicles much heavier means "a lot more force" is required to redirect the vehicle.

University of Nebraska professor Cody Stolle, told the Times, "We found these guardrail systems don’t have great compatibility with these [electric] vehicles yet."

The heavier vehicles also could cause more damage to other vehicles in collisions.

The report said an insurance institute expert confirmed the weight provides more protection to those inside the EV, but at the expense of anyone in another vehicle involved in an accident.

Joe Biden has insisted over and over that consumers should be buying the much more expensive and often less reliable electric cars the government programs subsidize.

The weight differences are significant. The report said the Tesla Model Y is more than 4,400 pounds while the similar size gas-powered Honda Accord is 3,300. Kia makes multiple SUVs, with the gas model weighting 3,900 pounds and the EV unit nearly 6,500.

Residential roads already are not engineered to handle the heavy weight on highways, and the lifespan of bridges could be reduced with much heavier traffic, the report said.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., recently said, "EVs are typically much heavier compared to similarly sized, gas-powered vehicles, which will put additional strain on America’s t***sportation infrastructure. The American Society of Civil Engineers warns that an increase in EVs could substantially reduce the lifespan of roads and bridges, necessitating further investment in infrastructure."

Reply
Feb 12, 2024 21:38:55   #
BIRDMAN
 
dtucker300 wrote:
'Will only increase the probability of failure'
By Bob Unruh
Published February 12, 2024 at 1:20pm

If all of the existing headaches for those pushing expensive electric vehicles on resisting American consumers could vanish, there's still a big one that may have no ready solution.

Already, it appears the U.S. could end up dependent on unfriendly nations for materials for all those batteries. Then there's the fact that the nation's grid simply can't support all that recharging – California already has been sending out advisories for owners not to charge. And then there's the limited range, extended recharging times, both worsened by bad weather.

But now a report in the Washington Times explains that those batteries are heavy, and EVs can weight up to 50% more than internal combustion motor vehicles.

And that weight damages roads, bridges and parking garages, with those vehicles easily plowing through safety guardrails while posing a higher danger to other drivers, pedestrians and bicyclists traveling the same routes.

"The problems associated with EVs are poised to grow as more consumers purchase the cars under the Biden administration’s plan to eliminate gas-powered vehicles and the tailpipe emissions that come with them," the report explained.

It explained engineers writing recently for Structure Magazine suggested construction companies, and building codes, need to make accommodations for the higher weight.

Parking garages, they said, should be redesigned to hold more weight.

That's because some hold hundreds of vehicles, and just one EV. A Ford truck weighs in at 8,240 pounds, nearly a ton more than the gas-powered version of the same pickup.

"Significantly increasing passenger vehicle weights combined with recently reduced structural design requirements will result in reduced factors of safety and increased maintenance and repair costs for parking structures," the engineers wrote. "There are many cases of parking structure failures, and the growing demand for EVs will only increase the probability of failure."

Then there are those guardrails, installed to minimize damage when traffic goes awry.

They are installed between lanes for traffic moving in opposite directions, between lanes and edge drop-offs and more.

That concern comes out of a procedure at a test facility in Nebraska, where examiners took a 3.6-ton Rivian R1 and sent it into a metal guardrail at 62 mph, first head-on, then at an angle.

Both times it "ripped through" the guardrail and continued into what would have been lanes for oncoming traffic, the report revealed.

The conclusion was simple: making vehicles much heavier means "a lot more force" is required to redirect the vehicle.

University of Nebraska professor Cody Stolle, told the Times, "We found these guardrail systems don’t have great compatibility with these [electric] vehicles yet."

The heavier vehicles also could cause more damage to other vehicles in collisions.

The report said an insurance institute expert confirmed the weight provides more protection to those inside the EV, but at the expense of anyone in another vehicle involved in an accident.

Joe Biden has insisted over and over that consumers should be buying the much more expensive and often less reliable electric cars the government programs subsidize.

The weight differences are significant. The report said the Tesla Model Y is more than 4,400 pounds while the similar size gas-powered Honda Accord is 3,300. Kia makes multiple SUVs, with the gas model weighting 3,900 pounds and the EV unit nearly 6,500.

Residential roads already are not engineered to handle the heavy weight on highways, and the lifespan of bridges could be reduced with much heavier traffic, the report said.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., recently said, "EVs are typically much heavier compared to similarly sized, gas-powered vehicles, which will put additional strain on America’s t***sportation infrastructure. The American Society of Civil Engineers warns that an increase in EVs could substantially reduce the lifespan of roads and bridges, necessitating further investment in infrastructure."
'Will only increase the probability of failure' br... (show quote)


👍👍👍👍👍And the Lithium is mined by children

Reply
Feb 12, 2024 21:59:52   #
Weasel Loc: In the Great State Of Indiana!!
 
BIRDMAN wrote:
👍👍👍👍👍And the Lithium is mined by children


That's the saddest part of it all.
Personally I will say that these poor people are making $.50 cents per a day. MABEY.



Reply
 
 
Feb 12, 2024 22:20:44   #
BIRDMAN
 
Weasel wrote:
That's the saddest part of it all.
Personally I will say that these poor people are making $.50 cents per a day. MABEY.


I think a lot of them are staying in $500 a night hotel rooms in New York

Reply
Feb 12, 2024 22:26:09   #
JFlorio Loc: Seminole Florida
 
Only government could push, subsidize, and mandate a product before the infrastructure for said product is in place.
dtucker300 wrote:
'Will only increase the probability of failure'
By Bob Unruh
Published February 12, 2024 at 1:20pm

If all of the existing headaches for those pushing expensive electric vehicles on resisting American consumers could vanish, there's still a big one that may have no ready solution.

Already, it appears the U.S. could end up dependent on unfriendly nations for materials for all those batteries. Then there's the fact that the nation's grid simply can't support all that recharging – California already has been sending out advisories for owners not to charge. And then there's the limited range, extended recharging times, both worsened by bad weather.

But now a report in the Washington Times explains that those batteries are heavy, and EVs can weight up to 50% more than internal combustion motor vehicles.

And that weight damages roads, bridges and parking garages, with those vehicles easily plowing through safety guardrails while posing a higher danger to other drivers, pedestrians and bicyclists traveling the same routes.

"The problems associated with EVs are poised to grow as more consumers purchase the cars under the Biden administration’s plan to eliminate gas-powered vehicles and the tailpipe emissions that come with them," the report explained.

It explained engineers writing recently for Structure Magazine suggested construction companies, and building codes, need to make accommodations for the higher weight.

Parking garages, they said, should be redesigned to hold more weight.

That's because some hold hundreds of vehicles, and just one EV. A Ford truck weighs in at 8,240 pounds, nearly a ton more than the gas-powered version of the same pickup.

"Significantly increasing passenger vehicle weights combined with recently reduced structural design requirements will result in reduced factors of safety and increased maintenance and repair costs for parking structures," the engineers wrote. "There are many cases of parking structure failures, and the growing demand for EVs will only increase the probability of failure."

Then there are those guardrails, installed to minimize damage when traffic goes awry.

They are installed between lanes for traffic moving in opposite directions, between lanes and edge drop-offs and more.

That concern comes out of a procedure at a test facility in Nebraska, where examiners took a 3.6-ton Rivian R1 and sent it into a metal guardrail at 62 mph, first head-on, then at an angle.

Both times it "ripped through" the guardrail and continued into what would have been lanes for oncoming traffic, the report revealed.

The conclusion was simple: making vehicles much heavier means "a lot more force" is required to redirect the vehicle.

University of Nebraska professor Cody Stolle, told the Times, "We found these guardrail systems don’t have great compatibility with these [electric] vehicles yet."

The heavier vehicles also could cause more damage to other vehicles in collisions.

The report said an insurance institute expert confirmed the weight provides more protection to those inside the EV, but at the expense of anyone in another vehicle involved in an accident.

Joe Biden has insisted over and over that consumers should be buying the much more expensive and often less reliable electric cars the government programs subsidize.

The weight differences are significant. The report said the Tesla Model Y is more than 4,400 pounds while the similar size gas-powered Honda Accord is 3,300. Kia makes multiple SUVs, with the gas model weighting 3,900 pounds and the EV unit nearly 6,500.

Residential roads already are not engineered to handle the heavy weight on highways, and the lifespan of bridges could be reduced with much heavier traffic, the report said.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., recently said, "EVs are typically much heavier compared to similarly sized, gas-powered vehicles, which will put additional strain on America’s t***sportation infrastructure. The American Society of Civil Engineers warns that an increase in EVs could substantially reduce the lifespan of roads and bridges, necessitating further investment in infrastructure."
'Will only increase the probability of failure' br... (show quote)

Reply
Feb 13, 2024 04:51:36   #
DAV
 
dtucker300 wrote:
'Will only increase the probability of failure'
By Bob Unruh
Published February 12, 2024 at 1:20pm

If all of the existing headaches for those pushing expensive electric vehicles on resisting American consumers could vanish, there's still a big one that may have no ready solution.

Already, it appears the U.S. could end up dependent on unfriendly nations for materials for all those batteries. Then there's the fact that the nation's grid simply can't support all that recharging – California already has been sending out advisories for owners not to charge. And then there's the limited range, extended recharging times, both worsened by bad weather.

But now a report in the Washington Times explains that those batteries are heavy, and EVs can weight up to 50% more than internal combustion motor vehicles.

And that weight damages roads, bridges and parking garages, with those vehicles easily plowing through safety guardrails while posing a higher danger to other drivers, pedestrians and bicyclists traveling the same routes.

"The problems associated with EVs are poised to grow as more consumers purchase the cars under the Biden administration’s plan to eliminate gas-powered vehicles and the tailpipe emissions that come with them," the report explained.

It explained engineers writing recently for Structure Magazine suggested construction companies, and building codes, need to make accommodations for the higher weight.

Parking garages, they said, should be redesigned to hold more weight.

That's because some hold hundreds of vehicles, and just one EV. A Ford truck weighs in at 8,240 pounds, nearly a ton more than the gas-powered version of the same pickup.

"Significantly increasing passenger vehicle weights combined with recently reduced structural design requirements will result in reduced factors of safety and increased maintenance and repair costs for parking structures," the engineers wrote. "There are many cases of parking structure failures, and the growing demand for EVs will only increase the probability of failure."

Then there are those guardrails, installed to minimize damage when traffic goes awry.

They are installed between lanes for traffic moving in opposite directions, between lanes and edge drop-offs and more.

That concern comes out of a procedure at a test facility in Nebraska, where examiners took a 3.6-ton Rivian R1 and sent it into a metal guardrail at 62 mph, first head-on, then at an angle.

Both times it "ripped through" the guardrail and continued into what would have been lanes for oncoming traffic, the report revealed.

The conclusion was simple: making vehicles much heavier means "a lot more force" is required to redirect the vehicle.

University of Nebraska professor Cody Stolle, told the Times, "We found these guardrail systems don’t have great compatibility with these [electric] vehicles yet."

The heavier vehicles also could cause more damage to other vehicles in collisions.

The report said an insurance institute expert confirmed the weight provides more protection to those inside the EV, but at the expense of anyone in another vehicle involved in an accident.

Joe Biden has insisted over and over that consumers should be buying the much more expensive and often less reliable electric cars the government programs subsidize.

The weight differences are significant. The report said the Tesla Model Y is more than 4,400 pounds while the similar size gas-powered Honda Accord is 3,300. Kia makes multiple SUVs, with the gas model weighting 3,900 pounds and the EV unit nearly 6,500.

Residential roads already are not engineered to handle the heavy weight on highways, and the lifespan of bridges could be reduced with much heavier traffic, the report said.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., recently said, "EVs are typically much heavier compared to similarly sized, gas-powered vehicles, which will put additional strain on America’s t***sportation infrastructure. The American Society of Civil Engineers warns that an increase in EVs could substantially reduce the lifespan of roads and bridges, necessitating further investment in infrastructure."
'Will only increase the probability of failure' br... (show quote)


The Lie-beral yuppies will just have to suffer the consequences of their actions, including the Clot Shots.

Reply
Feb 13, 2024 11:51:35   #
permafrost Loc: Minnesota
 
dtucker300 wrote:
'Will only increase the probability of failure'
By Bob Unruh
Published February 12, 2024 at 1:20pm

If all of the existing headaches for those pushing expensive electric vehicles on resisting American consumers could vanish, there's still a big one that may have no ready solution.

Already, it appears the U.S. could end up dependent on unfriendly nations for materials for all those batteries. Then there's the fact that the nation's grid simply can't support all that recharging – California already has been sending out advisories for owners not to charge. And then there's the limited range, extended recharging times, both worsened by bad weather.

But now a report in the Washington Times explains that those batteries are heavy, and EVs can weight up to 50% more than internal combustion motor vehicles.

And that weight damages roads, bridges and parking garages, with those vehicles easily plowing through safety guardrails while posing a higher danger to other drivers, pedestrians and bicyclists traveling the same routes.

"The problems associated with EVs are poised to grow as more consumers purchase the cars under the Biden administration’s plan to eliminate gas-powered vehicles and the tailpipe emissions that come with them," the report explained.

It explained engineers writing recently for Structure Magazine suggested construction companies, and building codes, need to make accommodations for the higher weight.

Parking garages, they said, should be redesigned to hold more weight.

That's because some hold hundreds of vehicles, and just one EV. A Ford truck weighs in at 8,240 pounds, nearly a ton more than the gas-powered version of the same pickup.

"Significantly increasing passenger vehicle weights combined with recently reduced structural design requirements will result in reduced factors of safety and increased maintenance and repair costs for parking structures," the engineers wrote. "There are many cases of parking structure failures, and the growing demand for EVs will only increase the probability of failure."

Then there are those guardrails, installed to minimize damage when traffic goes awry.

They are installed between lanes for traffic moving in opposite directions, between lanes and edge drop-offs and more.

That concern comes out of a procedure at a test facility in Nebraska, where examiners took a 3.6-ton Rivian R1 and sent it into a metal guardrail at 62 mph, first head-on, then at an angle.

Both times it "ripped through" the guardrail and continued into what would have been lanes for oncoming traffic, the report revealed.

The conclusion was simple: making vehicles much heavier means "a lot more force" is required to redirect the vehicle.

University of Nebraska professor Cody Stolle, told the Times, "We found these guardrail systems don’t have great compatibility with these [electric] vehicles yet."

The heavier vehicles also could cause more damage to other vehicles in collisions.

The report said an insurance institute expert confirmed the weight provides more protection to those inside the EV, but at the expense of anyone in another vehicle involved in an accident.

Joe Biden has insisted over and over that consumers should be buying the much more expensive and often less reliable electric cars the government programs subsidize.

The weight differences are significant. The report said the Tesla Model Y is more than 4,400 pounds while the similar size gas-powered Honda Accord is 3,300. Kia makes multiple SUVs, with the gas model weighting 3,900 pounds and the EV unit nearly 6,500.

Residential roads already are not engineered to handle the heavy weight on highways, and the lifespan of bridges could be reduced with much heavier traffic, the report said.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., recently said, "EVs are typically much heavier compared to similarly sized, gas-powered vehicles, which will put additional strain on America’s t***sportation infrastructure. The American Society of Civil Engineers warns that an increase in EVs could substantially reduce the lifespan of roads and bridges, necessitating further investment in infrastructure."
'Will only increase the probability of failure' br... (show quote)



At first read this is a compelling article..

but as I drink more morning coffee and ready myself for the PM coffee.....

A thought....

As I drive toward the twin cities or Canada... I notice that not all traffic is in the form of passenger cars of all types.. We see lots and lots of truck, some with trailers over 50 feet long. Ask myself, how long have those heavy objects been using our highways.. I find the answer to be,,, as long as I can remember..

And now someone says all the retaining barriers are so weak that they will not protect from a vehicle weighing less than 10,000 LBs????

Ask any of our truck driving freinds how much a tractor trailer weight on average load and how long our highways and byway have been dealing with these heavy vehicles..

So now at this late morning moment.. I am convinced the article is nothing but pure Bull Crap...

Just more resentment from the anti change people of these United States..

Use it for a trash can liner, at least get some use out of it..

Ignore the silly rant in this article and move on.. we have a real world to fix..

Reply
 
 
Feb 13, 2024 15:11:15   #
pegw
 
dtucker300 wrote:
'Will only increase the probability of failure'
By Bob Unruh
Published February 12, 2024 at 1:20pm

If all of the existing headaches for those pushing expensive electric vehicles on resisting American consumers could vanish, there's still a big one that may have no ready solution.

Already, it appears the U.S. could end up dependent on unfriendly nations for materials for all those batteries. Then there's the fact that the nation's grid simply can't support all that recharging – California already has been sending out advisories for owners not to charge. And then there's the limited range, extended recharging times, both worsened by bad weather.

But now a report in the Washington Times explains that those batteries are heavy, and EVs can weight up to 50% more than internal combustion motor vehicles.

And that weight damages roads, bridges and parking garages, with those vehicles easily plowing through safety guardrails while posing a higher danger to other drivers, pedestrians and bicyclists traveling the same routes.

"The problems associated with EVs are poised to grow as more consumers purchase the cars under the Biden administration’s plan to eliminate gas-powered vehicles and the tailpipe emissions that come with them," the report explained.

It explained engineers writing recently for Structure Magazine suggested construction companies, and building codes, need to make accommodations for the higher weight.

Parking garages, they said, should be redesigned to hold more weight.

That's because some hold hundreds of vehicles, and just one EV. A Ford truck weighs in at 8,240 pounds, nearly a ton more than the gas-powered version of the same pickup.

"Significantly increasing passenger vehicle weights combined with recently reduced structural design requirements will result in reduced factors of safety and increased maintenance and repair costs for parking structures," the engineers wrote. "There are many cases of parking structure failures, and the growing demand for EVs will only increase the probability of failure."

Then there are those guardrails, installed to minimize damage when traffic goes awry.

They are installed between lanes for traffic moving in opposite directions, between lanes and edge drop-offs and more.

That concern comes out of a procedure at a test facility in Nebraska, where examiners took a 3.6-ton Rivian R1 and sent it into a metal guardrail at 62 mph, first head-on, then at an angle.

Both times it "ripped through" the guardrail and continued into what would have been lanes for oncoming traffic, the report revealed.

The conclusion was simple: making vehicles much heavier means "a lot more force" is required to redirect the vehicle.

University of Nebraska professor Cody Stolle, told the Times, "We found these guardrail systems don’t have great compatibility with these [electric] vehicles yet."

The heavier vehicles also could cause more damage to other vehicles in collisions.

The report said an insurance institute expert confirmed the weight provides more protection to those inside the EV, but at the expense of anyone in another vehicle involved in an accident.

Joe Biden has insisted over and over that consumers should be buying the much more expensive and often less reliable electric cars the government programs subsidize.

The weight differences are significant. The report said the Tesla Model Y is more than 4,400 pounds while the similar size gas-powered Honda Accord is 3,300. Kia makes multiple SUVs, with the gas model weighting 3,900 pounds and the EV unit nearly 6,500.

Residential roads already are not engineered to handle the heavy weight on highways, and the lifespan of bridges could be reduced with much heavier traffic, the report said.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., recently said, "EVs are typically much heavier compared to similarly sized, gas-powered vehicles, which will put additional strain on America’s t***sportation infrastructure. The American Society of Civil Engineers warns that an increase in EVs could substantially reduce the lifespan of roads and bridges, necessitating further investment in infrastructure."
'Will only increase the probability of failure' br... (show quote)


So do you propose that Semi's be banned from the roads?

Reply
Feb 13, 2024 15:13:59   #
JFlorio Loc: Seminole Florida
 
pegw wrote:
So do you propose that Semi's be banned from the roads?


Shocker; point went over your pointy head.

Reply
Feb 13, 2024 15:57:27   #
martsiva
 
permafrost wrote:
At first read this is a compelling article..

but as I drink more morning coffee and ready myself for the PM coffee.....

A thought....

As I drive toward the twin cities or Canada... I notice that not all traffic is in the form of passenger cars of all types.. We see lots and lots of truck, some with trailers over 50 feet long. Ask myself, how long have those heavy objects been using our highways.. I find the answer to be,,, as long as I can remember..

And now someone says all the retaining barriers are so weak that they will not protect from a vehicle weighing less than 10,000 LBs????

Ask any of our truck driving freinds how much a tractor trailer weight on average load and how long our highways and byway have been dealing with these heavy vehicles..

So now at this late morning moment.. I am convinced the article is nothing but pure Bull Crap...

Just more resentment from the anti change people of these United States..

Use it for a trash can liner, at least get some use out of it..

Ignore the silly rant in this article and move on.. we have a real world to fix..
At first read this is a compelling article.. br ... (show quote)


So this justifies adding more weight from these EVs to our roads??

Reply
Feb 13, 2024 16:13:37   #
permafrost Loc: Minnesota
 
martsiva wrote:
So this justifies adding more weight from these EVs to our roads??


I am a bit leery about weight.. we had the 35 bridge fall when overloaded...

But why would you say that when an EV which weighs in at less than 10.000 # is the subject and the roads have been handling loads in the 30,000# or more for decades??

But is does seem like a good subject to debate about.. I say it will not be a problem for our highways..



Reply
 
 
Feb 13, 2024 16:35:44   #
dtucker300 Loc: Vista, CA
 
permafrost wrote:
I am a bit leery about weight.. we had the 35 bridge fall when overloaded...

But why would you say that when an EV which weighs in at less than 10.000 # is the subject and the roads have been handling loads in the 30,000# or more for decades??

But is does seem like a good subject to debate about.. I say it will not be a problem for our highways..


I'm sorry you don't understand civil engineering. You need to consider the cumulative effect to understand the problem.

Reply
Feb 13, 2024 20:55:10   #
F.D.R.
 
dtucker300 wrote:
'Will only increase the probability of failure'
By Bob Unruh
Published February 12, 2024 at 1:20pm

If all of the existing headaches for those pushing expensive electric vehicles on resisting American consumers could vanish, there's still a big one that may have no ready solution.

Already, it appears the U.S. could end up dependent on unfriendly nations for materials for all those batteries. Then there's the fact that the nation's grid simply can't support all that recharging – California already has been sending out advisories for owners not to charge. And then there's the limited range, extended recharging times, both worsened by bad weather.

But now a report in the Washington Times explains that those batteries are heavy, and EVs can weight up to 50% more than internal combustion motor vehicles.

And that weight damages roads, bridges and parking garages, with those vehicles easily plowing through safety guardrails while posing a higher danger to other drivers, pedestrians and bicyclists traveling the same routes.

"The problems associated with EVs are poised to grow as more consumers purchase the cars under the Biden administration’s plan to eliminate gas-powered vehicles and the tailpipe emissions that come with them," the report explained.

It explained engineers writing recently for Structure Magazine suggested construction companies, and building codes, need to make accommodations for the higher weight.

Parking garages, they said, should be redesigned to hold more weight.

That's because some hold hundreds of vehicles, and just one EV. A Ford truck weighs in at 8,240 pounds, nearly a ton more than the gas-powered version of the same pickup.

"Significantly increasing passenger vehicle weights combined with recently reduced structural design requirements will result in reduced factors of safety and increased maintenance and repair costs for parking structures," the engineers wrote. "There are many cases of parking structure failures, and the growing demand for EVs will only increase the probability of failure."

Then there are those guardrails, installed to minimize damage when traffic goes awry.

They are installed between lanes for traffic moving in opposite directions, between lanes and edge drop-offs and more.

That concern comes out of a procedure at a test facility in Nebraska, where examiners took a 3.6-ton Rivian R1 and sent it into a metal guardrail at 62 mph, first head-on, then at an angle.

Both times it "ripped through" the guardrail and continued into what would have been lanes for oncoming traffic, the report revealed.

The conclusion was simple: making vehicles much heavier means "a lot more force" is required to redirect the vehicle.

University of Nebraska professor Cody Stolle, told the Times, "We found these guardrail systems don’t have great compatibility with these [electric] vehicles yet."

The heavier vehicles also could cause more damage to other vehicles in collisions.

The report said an insurance institute expert confirmed the weight provides more protection to those inside the EV, but at the expense of anyone in another vehicle involved in an accident.

Joe Biden has insisted over and over that consumers should be buying the much more expensive and often less reliable electric cars the government programs subsidize.

The weight differences are significant. The report said the Tesla Model Y is more than 4,400 pounds while the similar size gas-powered Honda Accord is 3,300. Kia makes multiple SUVs, with the gas model weighting 3,900 pounds and the EV unit nearly 6,500.

Residential roads already are not engineered to handle the heavy weight on highways, and the lifespan of bridges could be reduced with much heavier traffic, the report said.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., recently said, "EVs are typically much heavier compared to similarly sized, gas-powered vehicles, which will put additional strain on America’s t***sportation infrastructure. The American Society of Civil Engineers warns that an increase in EVs could substantially reduce the lifespan of roads and bridges, necessitating further investment in infrastructure."
'Will only increase the probability of failure' br... (show quote)


As usual the government has it ass backwards. FIRST invest in increasing the electric supply and improve the grid and infrastructure while continuing development to replace gas powered vehicles, perhaps hybrids or lighter weight batteries for EV's.

Reply
Feb 13, 2024 21:01:39   #
JFlorio Loc: Seminole Florida
 
F.D.R. wrote:
As usual the government has it ass backwards. FIRST invest in increasing the electric supply and improve the grid and infrastructure while continuing development to replace gas powered vehicles, perhaps hybrids or lighter weight batteries for EV's.


In my opinion let the government stay out of it. If the free market dictates electric and hybrids are popular then let nature take its course.

Reply
Feb 14, 2024 09:31:03   #
American Vet
 
JFlorio wrote:
In my opinion let the government stay out of it. If the free market dictates electric and hybrids are popular then let nature take its course.



Reply
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