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The Not-So-Subtle Left-Leaning Message of the 'He Gets Us' Super Bowl Ad
Feb 12, 2024 17:30:39   #
Parky60 Loc: People's Republic of Illinois
 
I found plenty to be excited about at Sunday night's Super Bowl. It was a back-and-forth game rather than a one-sided blowout.

The commercials, on the other hand, were hit or miss, as has been the case for the last few years. One ad in particular missed in a big way; it came from the "He Gets Us" campaign, which aims to start conversations about Jesus.

In past Super Bowl "He Gets Us" commercials, good points were made but they still missed the mark. And the problem, as always as in past Super Bowls and this one, is that the conversation falls short of the gospel.

It's a lovely sentiment, and, yes, Jesus' act of washing His disciples' feet is a humble act of service that He intended for us to emulate in multiple ways. And Christians — and even decent people who don't believe in Jesus — should treat others well without regard for how different those others are.

But the connotations of the ad are far from subtle. The act of washing feet is inherently humbling — humiliating, even — and in some instances the ad depicts, it's "mainstream" members of society humbling themselves. A cop washes a homeless woman's feet. Someone who looks like a middle-aged Texan washes the feet of what appears to be an i*****l i*******t. A woman washes a younger woman's feet outside an a******n clinic. A priest washes the feet of a stereotypically flamboyant young gay man. It's hard to ignore what the ad is trying to get across.

I've long maintained that people put a little too much emphasis on Jesus' act of washing the disciples' feet. Again, it's an important account in the New Testament with a valuable lesson to learn from it, but Jesus also called people to repentance and to follow Him. And while the message of the ad that "Jesus didn't preach h**e" is true, the commercial still neglects the full context of Jesus' invitation to turn from a life of sin to redemption.

I'm not the only one who noticed how the ad falls short of the gospel message. Christian apologist and graphic designer Phoenix Hayes doesn't mince words in her assessment of the ad.

Another apologist with an impressive Instagram presence is Michael Moore (not the left-wing filmmaker) who posts as "honestyouthpastor." Moore made a video where he talked about the ad, and his description of it hits the nail on the head.

Moore writes in his caption that messages like these "are what one would expect from a 'let’s do everything short of sin to tell people about Jesus' mentality. Its surface level at best yet misses the entire call of Jesus, 'repent the Kingdom of Heaven is near!'"

He adds:

It portrays Jesus’ act of humility as an act of acceptance. A live and let live type of mentality.

However, this was neither the message of the foot washing nor the message of loving one’s enemies. Both acts are a way to follow in the ways of Jesus.

The way of humble obedience to God, walking in holiness.

What he has to say in the video is worth hearing, too.

In another Instagram post on Monday morning, Moore writes, "There are ways to communicate the Gospel clearly within very short amounts of time. Speaking of sin, repentance, and reconciliation to both God and others. That attempt was not made."

He adds, "I’m glad there are attempts being made to evangelize, I’m also disappointed that these attempts resemble moralistic deism more than they do the Gospel of Christ."

Dallas-area pastor Josh Howerton weighed in on Instagram as well. He handles it charitably, urging followers to not automatically bash the "He Gets Us" people. "I don’t know them, but I bet they have great hearts that just wanna see people know Jesus," he writes in his caption.

Howerton also acknowledges that the goal of the "He Gets Us" campaign to start gospel conversations is admirable. At the same time, he points out the flaw in the Super Bowl commercial.

"This ad (accidentally?) signal-boosted to 100M people a very misleading and extremely popular message in our culture," he writes. It's a misleading message that the ad embedded in its tagline.

"When they show pictures of Jesus with people who identify as t*********r, women getting a******ns, activists for ungodly causes and then say, 'Jesus didn't teach h**e,' the (progressive) culture they're gearing the ad to is assuming their definition of 'h**e as non-affirmation,'" Howerton points out, adding (with emphasis in the original), "As a result, people see [the] ad and think, 'Cool, it doesn't require any change (repentance) for me and Jesus to be good.'"

Howerton cites 2 Corinthians 11:4, in which the Apostle Paul calls out those who fall for "another Jesus than the one we proclaimed" and notes:

Ad-Jesus: "I do not condemn you. That's all I have to say."

Real Jesus: "I do not condemn you. Now go, and sin no more."

And our culture likes the Ad-Jesus more...

I'm willing to give "He Gets Us" some credit for opening up conversations about the gospel, but starter conversations aren't enough. People need to hear the entire gospel, and that includes repentance and fleeing from sin.

Hours after Jesus washed His disciples' feet, He went to the cross to give His life for their sins — and ours. Then He conquered death and Hell. That's the gospel that saves us, and it's what all the world needs to hear.

Reply
Feb 12, 2024 17:39:17   #
Liberty Tree
 
Parky60 wrote:
I found plenty to be excited about at Sunday night's Super Bowl. It was a back-and-forth game rather than a one-sided blowout.

The commercials, on the other hand, were hit or miss, as has been the case for the last few years. One ad in particular missed in a big way; it came from the "He Gets Us" campaign, which aims to start conversations about Jesus.

In past Super Bowl "He Gets Us" commercials, good points were made but they still missed the mark. And the problem, as always as in past Super Bowls and this one, is that the conversation falls short of the gospel.

It's a lovely sentiment, and, yes, Jesus' act of washing His disciples' feet is a humble act of service that He intended for us to emulate in multiple ways. And Christians — and even decent people who don't believe in Jesus — should treat others well without regard for how different those others are.

But the connotations of the ad are far from subtle. The act of washing feet is inherently humbling — humiliating, even — and in some instances the ad depicts, it's "mainstream" members of society humbling themselves. A cop washes a homeless woman's feet. Someone who looks like a middle-aged Texan washes the feet of what appears to be an i*****l i*******t. A woman washes a younger woman's feet outside an a******n clinic. A priest washes the feet of a stereotypically flamboyant young gay man. It's hard to ignore what the ad is trying to get across.

I've long maintained that people put a little too much emphasis on Jesus' act of washing the disciples' feet. Again, it's an important account in the New Testament with a valuable lesson to learn from it, but Jesus also called people to repentance and to follow Him. And while the message of the ad that "Jesus didn't preach h**e" is true, the commercial still neglects the full context of Jesus' invitation to turn from a life of sin to redemption.

I'm not the only one who noticed how the ad falls short of the gospel message. Christian apologist and graphic designer Phoenix Hayes doesn't mince words in her assessment of the ad.

Another apologist with an impressive Instagram presence is Michael Moore (not the left-wing filmmaker) who posts as "honestyouthpastor." Moore made a video where he talked about the ad, and his description of it hits the nail on the head.

Moore writes in his caption that messages like these "are what one would expect from a 'let’s do everything short of sin to tell people about Jesus' mentality. Its surface level at best yet misses the entire call of Jesus, 'repent the Kingdom of Heaven is near!'"

He adds:

It portrays Jesus’ act of humility as an act of acceptance. A live and let live type of mentality.

However, this was neither the message of the foot washing nor the message of loving one’s enemies. Both acts are a way to follow in the ways of Jesus.

The way of humble obedience to God, walking in holiness.

What he has to say in the video is worth hearing, too.

In another Instagram post on Monday morning, Moore writes, "There are ways to communicate the Gospel clearly within very short amounts of time. Speaking of sin, repentance, and reconciliation to both God and others. That attempt was not made."

He adds, "I’m glad there are attempts being made to evangelize, I’m also disappointed that these attempts resemble moralistic deism more than they do the Gospel of Christ."

Dallas-area pastor Josh Howerton weighed in on Instagram as well. He handles it charitably, urging followers to not automatically bash the "He Gets Us" people. "I don’t know them, but I bet they have great hearts that just wanna see people know Jesus," he writes in his caption.

Howerton also acknowledges that the goal of the "He Gets Us" campaign to start gospel conversations is admirable. At the same time, he points out the flaw in the Super Bowl commercial.

"This ad (accidentally?) signal-boosted to 100M people a very misleading and extremely popular message in our culture," he writes. It's a misleading message that the ad embedded in its tagline.

"When they show pictures of Jesus with people who identify as t*********r, women getting a******ns, activists for ungodly causes and then say, 'Jesus didn't teach h**e,' the (progressive) culture they're gearing the ad to is assuming their definition of 'h**e as non-affirmation,'" Howerton points out, adding (with emphasis in the original), "As a result, people see [the] ad and think, 'Cool, it doesn't require any change (repentance) for me and Jesus to be good.'"

Howerton cites 2 Corinthians 11:4, in which the Apostle Paul calls out those who fall for "another Jesus than the one we proclaimed" and notes:

Ad-Jesus: "I do not condemn you. That's all I have to say."

Real Jesus: "I do not condemn you. Now go, and sin no more."

And our culture likes the Ad-Jesus more...

I'm willing to give "He Gets Us" some credit for opening up conversations about the gospel, but starter conversations aren't enough. People need to hear the entire gospel, and that includes repentance and fleeing from sin.

Hours after Jesus washed His disciples' feet, He went to the cross to give His life for their sins — and ours. Then He conquered death and Hell. That's the gospel that saves us, and it's what all the world needs to hear.
I found plenty to be excited about at Sunday night... (show quote)


Great post

Reply
Feb 12, 2024 17:45:40   #
AuntiE Loc: 45th Least Free State
 
Parky60 wrote:
I found plenty to be excited about at Sunday night's Super Bowl. It was a back-and-forth game rather than a one-sided blowout.

The commercials, on the other hand, were hit or miss, as has been the case for the last few years. One ad in particular missed in a big way; it came from the "He Gets Us" campaign, which aims to start conversations about Jesus.

In past Super Bowl "He Gets Us" commercials, good points were made but they still missed the mark. And the problem, as always as in past Super Bowls and this one, is that the conversation falls short of the gospel.

It's a lovely sentiment, and, yes, Jesus' act of washing His disciples' feet is a humble act of service that He intended for us to emulate in multiple ways. And Christians — and even decent people who don't believe in Jesus — should treat others well without regard for how different those others are.

But the connotations of the ad are far from subtle. The act of washing feet is inherently humbling — humiliating, even — and in some instances the ad depicts, it's "mainstream" members of society humbling themselves. A cop washes a homeless woman's feet. Someone who looks like a middle-aged Texan washes the feet of what appears to be an i*****l i*******t. A woman washes a younger woman's feet outside an a******n clinic. A priest washes the feet of a stereotypically flamboyant young gay man. It's hard to ignore what the ad is trying to get across.

I've long maintained that people put a little too much emphasis on Jesus' act of washing the disciples' feet. Again, it's an important account in the New Testament with a valuable lesson to learn from it, but Jesus also called people to repentance and to follow Him. And while the message of the ad that "Jesus didn't preach h**e" is true, the commercial still neglects the full context of Jesus' invitation to turn from a life of sin to redemption.

I'm not the only one who noticed how the ad falls short of the gospel message. Christian apologist and graphic designer Phoenix Hayes doesn't mince words in her assessment of the ad.

Another apologist with an impressive Instagram presence is Michael Moore (not the left-wing filmmaker) who posts as "honestyouthpastor." Moore made a video where he talked about the ad, and his description of it hits the nail on the head.

Moore writes in his caption that messages like these "are what one would expect from a 'let’s do everything short of sin to tell people about Jesus' mentality. Its surface level at best yet misses the entire call of Jesus, 'repent the Kingdom of Heaven is near!'"

He adds:

It portrays Jesus’ act of humility as an act of acceptance. A live and let live type of mentality.

However, this was neither the message of the foot washing nor the message of loving one’s enemies. Both acts are a way to follow in the ways of Jesus.

The way of humble obedience to God, walking in holiness.

What he has to say in the video is worth hearing, too.

In another Instagram post on Monday morning, Moore writes, "There are ways to communicate the Gospel clearly within very short amounts of time. Speaking of sin, repentance, and reconciliation to both God and others. That attempt was not made."

He adds, "I’m glad there are attempts being made to evangelize, I’m also disappointed that these attempts resemble moralistic deism more than they do the Gospel of Christ."

Dallas-area pastor Josh Howerton weighed in on Instagram as well. He handles it charitably, urging followers to not automatically bash the "He Gets Us" people. "I don’t know them, but I bet they have great hearts that just wanna see people know Jesus," he writes in his caption.

Howerton also acknowledges that the goal of the "He Gets Us" campaign to start gospel conversations is admirable. At the same time, he points out the flaw in the Super Bowl commercial.

"This ad (accidentally?) signal-boosted to 100M people a very misleading and extremely popular message in our culture," he writes. It's a misleading message that the ad embedded in its tagline.

"When they show pictures of Jesus with people who identify as t*********r, women getting a******ns, activists for ungodly causes and then say, 'Jesus didn't teach h**e,' the (progressive) culture they're gearing the ad to is assuming their definition of 'h**e as non-affirmation,'" Howerton points out, adding (with emphasis in the original), "As a result, people see [the] ad and think, 'Cool, it doesn't require any change (repentance) for me and Jesus to be good.'"

Howerton cites 2 Corinthians 11:4, in which the Apostle Paul calls out those who fall for "another Jesus than the one we proclaimed" and notes:

Ad-Jesus: "I do not condemn you. That's all I have to say."

Real Jesus: "I do not condemn you. Now go, and sin no more."

And our culture likes the Ad-Jesus more...

I'm willing to give "He Gets Us" some credit for opening up conversations about the gospel, but starter conversations aren't enough. People need to hear the entire gospel, and that includes repentance and fleeing from sin.

Hours after Jesus washed His disciples' feet, He went to the cross to give His life for their sins — and ours. Then He conquered death and Hell. That's the gospel that saves us, and it's what all the world needs to hear.
I found plenty to be excited about at Sunday night... (show quote)


As with all progressive messages, once you buy into the acceptance they push next you will be required to glorify the perversions they practice.

Reply
 
 
Feb 13, 2024 08:32:05   #
currahee506
 
The Apostle Paul states in his opening letter to the Roman Church that the Gospel is "God's power." What makes it His power is the message of who Jesus is. He said He is "God" because He can forgive people of their sins, and, only God can do this. Most people reject this message because we think we are good enough to be accepted by God without believing in who He is and why He came to do what He said He would do for Adam and Eve, our first parents. The t***h forever sets us free from our chains of unrighteous standing before God when we believe it is His righteousness that is put to our account; and, this is "powerful."

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