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INSANE: Young Americans Don’t Know ANYTHING!
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Jun 22, 2022 12:31:32   #
Parky60 Loc: People's Republic of Illinois
 
INSANE: Young Americans Don’t Know ANYTHING! (4 minutes). Government schools have taught children nothing. They are being radicalized but do not know how many eggs are in a dozen, what year America was founded, or how many states there are in the US. Another great reason to homeschool.

https://youtu.be/Ufmcubp2szg

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Jun 22, 2022 12:48:21   #
bggamers Loc: georgia
 
Parky60 wrote:
INSANE: Young Americans Don’t Know ANYTHING! (4 minutes). Government schools have taught children nothing. They are being radicalized but do not know how many eggs are in a dozen, what year America was founded, or how many states there are in the US. Another great reason to homeschool.

https://youtu.be/Ufmcubp2szg


This is why our country is going to hell

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Jun 22, 2022 13:12:54   #
pegw
 
One thing that I see at the grocery store is that young people can't do any math calculations in their head. Like if something is $12.67, and I give them $20.08 they can't figure out I want 7.25 back.

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Jun 22, 2022 13:26:27   #
proud republican Loc: RED CALIFORNIA
 
pegw wrote:
One thing that I see at the grocery store is that young people can't do any math calculations in their head. Like if something is $12.67, and I give them $20.08 they can't figure out I want 7.25 back.


You mean $7.41?

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Jun 22, 2022 15:39:10   #
LogicallyRight Loc: Chicago
 
Don't confuse her. She went to those schools also.

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Jun 22, 2022 17:11:14   #
JR-57 Loc: South Carolina
 
pegw wrote:
One thing that I see at the grocery store is that young people can't do any math calculations in their head. Like if something is $12.67, and I give them $20.08 they can't figure out I want 7.25 back.

🤔

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Jun 22, 2022 17:42:10   #
robertv3
 
Parky60 wrote:
INSANE: Young Americans Don’t Know ANYTHING! (4 minutes). Government schools have taught children nothing. They are being radicalized but do not know how many eggs are in a dozen, what year America was founded, or how many states there are in the US. Another great reason to homeschool.

https://youtu.be/Ufmcubp2szg


My kids and I and almost all of my extended family got our k-12 educations in public schools. We did know, at early ages, how many eggs are in a dozen, which year America declared its independence (1776), and how many states are in the U.S., and we learned the latter two facts in grade school. (We knew "dozen" from home life.) But if you were referring to a date later than 1776 (1789?) as the "founding" then I didn't know that one.

I learned a lot in public school, especially in grade school where all my teachers were excellent, and that was in a tiny town in the middle of the country where almost all of us were farm kids.

But there are more useful things to know than the ones you listed. Very few people really need to know how many states are in the U.S., nor even what year the U.S. was founded. That "dozen" = 12 is occasionally useful but most other measurements are more useful. I think grammar and arithmetic (including fractions and decimals) and spelling are all very useful, and I learned those mostly in the 3rd, 5th, and 9th grades of public school.

My kids, who also got their k-12 educations in public schools and graduated from 12th grade about 2010, got a better education from their public school than I did from my public school. They are either smarter or better-educated than I am in most ways.

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Jun 22, 2022 17:51:32   #
Rose42
 
robertv3 wrote:
My kids and I and almost all of my extended family got our k-12 educations in public schools. We did know, at early ages, how many eggs are in a dozen, which year America declared its independence (1776), and how many states are in the U.S., and we learned the latter two facts in grade school. (We knew "dozen" from home life.) But if you were referring to a date later than 1776 (1789?) as the "founding" then I didn't know that one.

I learned a lot in public school, especially in grade school where all my teachers were excellent, and that was in a tiny town in the middle of the country where almost all of us were farm kids.

But there are more useful things to know than the ones you listed. Very few people really need to know how many states are in the U.S., nor even what year the U.S. was founded. That "dozen" = 12 is occasionally useful but most other measurements are more useful. I think grammar and arithmetic (including fractions and decimals) and spelling are all very useful, and I learned those mostly in the 3rd, 5th, and 9th grades of public school.

My kids, who also got their k-12 educations in public schools and graduated from 12th grade about 2010, got a better education from their public school than I did from my public school. They are either smarter or better-educated than I am in most ways.
My kids and I and almost all of my extended family... (show quote)


I am amazed you are making excuses for this.

I definitely haven’t seen evidence that children are better educated these days. Just the opposite.

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Jun 22, 2022 17:53:43   #
Blade_Runner Loc: DARK SIDE OF THE MOON
 
Parky60 wrote:
INSANE: Young Americans Don’t Know ANYTHING! (4 minutes). Government schools have taught children nothing. They are being radicalized but do not know how many eggs are in a dozen, what year America was founded, or how many states there are in the US. Another great reason to homeschool.

https://youtu.be/Ufmcubp2szg
This is a politically biased selective polling based on the assumption that ALL "Young Americans Don't Know ANYTHING" and totally ignores millions of young Americans who have their act together.
The youngsters of whom I speak are intelligent, talented, creative, disciplined, goal oriented, productive and wonderfully alive, not one of them can be tossed into Hillary's "Basket of Deplorables".

Moreover, many of them have attended or are attending public schools.

A hasty generalization is a logical fallacy.

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Jun 22, 2022 18:00:04   #
robertv3
 
proud republican wrote:
You mean $7.41?


Love it!

I spent some time with paper and pen to verify it.

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Jun 22, 2022 18:20:48   #
robertv3
 
Rose42 wrote:
I am amazed you are making excuses for this.

I definitely haven’t seen evidence that children are better educated these days. Just the opposite.


Public schools _can_ give good educations. They are being underfunded. When my younger child was in the 7th grade she wrote a letter to our big city newspaper complaining about this underfunding which had begun impacting her school.

(Incidentally, I had a letter in the same paper the same day hers appeared in it, and her letter was better than mine.)

You are right if you mean that a large portion of U.S. children are insufficiently educated. I understand that. But my point was about something else. My point was that public schools can be good and deserve respect and support.

The problem with U.S. education isn't that schools are government-run; rather, the problem is that they are underfunded, and aren't getting enough respect and support from the public, and that the U.S. citizenry doesn't respect education enough.

Students in some other countries are better educated than ours are, and it's not a difference between public and private schooling; rather, the people in those countries have a more supportive attitude toward education, and more respect for it, than people do in the U.S.

(In addition, they aren't so monolingual and monocultural as so many U.S. voters are, so, _I_ think, they have more awareness about the world.)

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Jun 22, 2022 18:34:48   #
bggamers Loc: georgia
 
robertv3 wrote:
My kids and I and almost all of my extended family got our k-12 educations in public schools. We did know, at early ages, how many eggs are in a dozen, which year America declared its independence (1776), and how many states are in the U.S., and we learned the latter two facts in grade school. (We knew "dozen" from home life.) But if you were referring to a date later than 1776 (1789?) as the "founding" then I didn't know that one.

I learned a lot in public school, especially in grade school where all my teachers were excellent, and that was in a tiny town in the middle of the country where almost all of us were farm kids.

But there are more useful things to know than the ones you listed. Very few people really need to know how many states are in the U.S., nor even what year the U.S. was founded. That "dozen" = 12 is occasionally useful but most other measurements are more useful. I think grammar and arithmetic (including fractions and decimals) and spelling are all very useful, and I learned those mostly in the 3rd, 5th, and 9th grades of public school.

My kids, who also got their k-12 educations in public schools and graduated from 12th grade about 2010, got a better education from their public school than I did from my public school. They are either smarter or better-educated than I am in most ways.
My kids and I and almost all of my extended family... (show quote)


Unfortunately, most other countries have better knowledge about our history than our younger generation and probably remember most what we have forgotten

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Jun 23, 2022 06:43:14   #
Big dog
 
robertv3 wrote:
My kids and I and almost all of my extended family got our k-12 educations in public schools. We did know, at early ages, how many eggs are in a dozen, which year America declared its independence (1776), and how many states are in the U.S., and we learned the latter two facts in grade school. (We knew "dozen" from home life.) But if you were referring to a date later than 1776 (1789?) as the "founding" then I didn't know that one.

I learned a lot in public school, especially in grade school where all my teachers were excellent, and that was in a tiny town in the middle of the country where almost all of us were farm kids.

But there are more useful things to know than the ones you listed. Very few people really need to know how many states are in the U.S., nor even what year the U.S. was founded. That "dozen" = 12 is occasionally useful but most other measurements are more useful. I think grammar and arithmetic (including fractions and decimals) and spelling are all very useful, and I learned those mostly in the 3rd, 5th, and 9th grades of public school.

My kids, who also got their k-12 educations in public schools and graduated from 12th grade about 2010, got a better education from their public school than I did from my public school. They are either smarter or better-educated than I am in most ways.
My kids and I and almost all of my extended family... (show quote)


Ya can’t build a house by starting in the attic. Ya gotta build from the ground up. The kids in the video are lucky to remember how to breathe!

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Jun 23, 2022 07:06:44   #
guzzimaestro
 
LogicallyRight wrote:
Don't confuse her. She went to those schools also.



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Jun 23, 2022 14:34:38   #
WEBCO
 
robertv3 wrote:
Public schools _can_ give good educations. They are being underfunded. When my younger child was in the 7th grade she wrote a letter to our big city newspaper complaining about this underfunding which had begun impacting her school.

(Incidentally, I had a letter in the same paper the same day hers appeared in it, and her letter was better than mine.)

You are right if you mean that a large portion of U.S. children are insufficiently educated. I understand that. But my point was about something else. My point was that public schools can be good and deserve respect and support.

The problem with U.S. education isn't that schools are government-run; rather, the problem is that they are underfunded, and aren't getting enough respect and support from the public, and that the U.S. citizenry doesn't respect education enough.

Students in some other countries are better educated than ours are, and it's not a difference between public and private schooling; rather, the people in those countries have a more supportive attitude toward education, and more respect for it, than people do in the U.S.

(In addition, they aren't so monolingual and monocultural as so many U.S. voters are, so, _I_ think, they have more awareness about the world.)
Public schools _can_ give good educations. They a... (show quote)

Schools aren't underfunded they just spend way to much money on administrators. In my state we have a law where the $ follows the child, it works great. If a public school doesn't offer a good education you can send them to a charter school for free. The charter schools offer a much better education than their public peers do.

The children get a better education and the parents love the options. The only people who don't like it is the teachers unions, which to me means that we are doing something. right

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