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More Storm Trumpers: MAGAfied Right Oath Keepers first to be charged with seditious conspiracy in Capitol attack
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Jan 14, 2022 18:00:26   #
rumitoid
 
Reuters
Sarah N. Lynch and Jan Wolfe
Thu, January 13, 2022, 11:37 AM

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. prosecutors on Thursday charged the founder of the far-right Oath Keepers militia, Stewart Rhodes, and 10 alleged members of the group with seditious conspiracy for their role in the deadly Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol.

They said Rhodes had warned his group to prepare for a "bloody and desperate fight" in the days leading up to the assault, when supporters of then-President Donald Trump tried to stop Congress from certifying his election defeat.

This is the first time alleged participants in the attack have been charged with seditious conspiracy, which is defined as attempting "to overthrow, put down or to destroy by force the government of the United States."

"We are going to have a fight," prosecutors said Rhodes told his allies on the messaging app Signal. "That can't be avoided."

The Oath Keepers are a loosely organized group of activists who believe that the federal government is encroaching on their rights, and focus on recruiting current and former police, emergency services and military members.

Nine of the eleven charged with seditious conspiracy were already facing other charges relating to the Capitol attack. Members of the far-right Proud Boys and Three Percenters have also been charged with taking part in the attack.

ATTEMPT TO STOP TRANSFER OF POWER

The indictment says Rhodes started sending messages to his followers in November 2020, the month of Trump's election loss to Democrat Joe Biden, encouraging them to "oppose by force the lawful transfer of presidential power."

After his defeat, Trump repeatedly made false claims that his loss was a result of widespread fraud. He repeated those claims in a fiery speech near the White House before thousands of his followers stormed the Capitol in the worst attack on the seat of Congress since the War of 1812.

Prosecutors said that beginning in late December 2020, Rhodes used private encrypted communications to plan to travel to Washington on Jan. 6. He and others planned to bring weapons to help support the operation, prosecutors said.

While some of the Oath Keeper members rushed inside the building wearing tactical gear, others remained outside in what they deemed "quick-response force" teams, which were prepared to rapidly transport arms into the city, prosecutors said.

Jon Moseley, an attorney for Rhodes, told Reuters he was on the phone with Rhodes to discuss his planned appearance before the House Select Committee on Jan. 6 when the FBI called.

"He patched me in on the call and I identified myself as his lawyer," Moseley said in an e-mail. The agent then told him they were outside Rhodes' home in Granbury, Texas, and were there to arrest him.

The indictment alleges that Thomas Caldwell, who was previously charged, and Edward Vallejo of Arizona, a new defendant, were in charge of coordinating the quick-response force teams.

Seditious conspiracy is a felony carrying a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland last week vowed to hold accountable anyone involved in the attack on the Capitol. The department has charged more than 725 people with crimes arising from the attack. Of those people, about 165 have pleaded guilty and at least 70 have been sentenced. Garland said the Justice Department would "follow the facts wherever they lead."

On the day of the attack, four people died. One of them, Ashli Babbitt, was shot dead by Capitol Police while trying to break into the Speaker's Gallery. Three others died of natural causes.

The following day, Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick died. Although he had been sprayed with a chemical irritant the day of the attack, it was later determined he died of natural causes. Around 140 police officers were injured, and four police officers later died by suicide.

The Justice Department has previously obtained seditious conspiracy convictions against Puerto Rican nationalists and alleged Islamist militants including Sheikh Omar Abdel Rahman, the radical Islamic clergyman known as the "Blind Sheikh."
https://www.yahoo.com/news/fbi-arrests-far-militia-group-183728300.html

Reply
Jan 14, 2022 18:13:55   #
Kevyn
 
rumitoid wrote:
Reuters
Sarah N. Lynch and Jan Wolfe
Thu, January 13, 2022, 11:37 AM

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. prosecutors on Thursday charged the founder of the far-right Oath Keepers militia, Stewart Rhodes, and 10 alleged members of the group with seditious conspiracy for their role in the deadly Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol.

They said Rhodes had warned his group to prepare for a "bloody and desperate fight" in the days leading up to the assault, when supporters of then-President Donald Trump tried to stop Congress from certifying his election defeat.

This is the first time alleged participants in the attack have been charged with seditious conspiracy, which is defined as attempting "to overthrow, put down or to destroy by force the government of the United States."

"We are going to have a fight," prosecutors said Rhodes told his allies on the messaging app Signal. "That can't be avoided."

The Oath Keepers are a loosely organized group of activists who believe that the federal government is encroaching on their rights, and focus on recruiting current and former police, emergency services and military members.

Nine of the eleven charged with seditious conspiracy were already facing other charges relating to the Capitol attack. Members of the far-right Proud Boys and Three Percenters have also been charged with taking part in the attack.

ATTEMPT TO STOP TRANSFER OF POWER

The indictment says Rhodes started sending messages to his followers in November 2020, the month of Trump's election loss to Democrat Joe Biden, encouraging them to "oppose by force the lawful transfer of presidential power."

After his defeat, Trump repeatedly made false claims that his loss was a result of widespread fraud. He repeated those claims in a fiery speech near the White House before thousands of his followers stormed the Capitol in the worst attack on the seat of Congress since the War of 1812.

Prosecutors said that beginning in late December 2020, Rhodes used private encrypted communications to plan to travel to Washington on Jan. 6. He and others planned to bring weapons to help support the operation, prosecutors said.

While some of the Oath Keeper members rushed inside the building wearing tactical gear, others remained outside in what they deemed "quick-response force" teams, which were prepared to rapidly transport arms into the city, prosecutors said.

Jon Moseley, an attorney for Rhodes, told Reuters he was on the phone with Rhodes to discuss his planned appearance before the House Select Committee on Jan. 6 when the FBI called.

"He patched me in on the call and I identified myself as his lawyer," Moseley said in an e-mail. The agent then told him they were outside Rhodes' home in Granbury, Texas, and were there to arrest him.

The indictment alleges that Thomas Caldwell, who was previously charged, and Edward Vallejo of Arizona, a new defendant, were in charge of coordinating the quick-response force teams.

Seditious conspiracy is a felony carrying a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland last week vowed to hold accountable anyone involved in the attack on the Capitol. The department has charged more than 725 people with crimes arising from the attack. Of those people, about 165 have pleaded guilty and at least 70 have been sentenced. Garland said the Justice Department would "follow the facts wherever they lead."

On the day of the attack, four people died. One of them, Ashli Babbitt, was shot dead by Capitol Police while trying to break into the Speaker's Gallery. Three others died of natural causes.

The following day, Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick died. Although he had been sprayed with a chemical irritant the day of the attack, it was later determined he died of natural causes. Around 140 police officers were injured, and four police officers later died by suicide.

The Justice Department has previously obtained seditious conspiracy convictions against Puerto Rican nationalists and alleged Islamist militants including Sheikh Omar Abdel Rahman, the radical Islamic clergyman known as the "Blind Sheikh."
https://www.yahoo.com/news/fbi-arrests-far-militia-group-183728300.html
Reuters br Sarah N. Lynch and Jan Wolfe br Thu, Ja... (show quote)

These clowns are similar to the blowhards here who say come and take them when they think the government is coming for their guns. Of course not one of these assclowns went down “decks awash and guns blazing” they all meekly and quietly surrendered to the feds. Some militia, a bunch of pantywaist jokers.

Reply
Jan 14, 2022 18:39:07   #
Gatsby
 
rumitoid wrote:
Reuters
Sarah N. Lynch and Jan Wolfe
Thu, January 13, 2022, 11:37 AM

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. prosecutors on Thursday charged the founder of the far-right Oath Keepers militia, Stewart Rhodes, and 10 alleged members of the group with seditious conspiracy for their role in the deadly Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol.

They said Rhodes had warned his group to prepare for a "bloody and desperate fight" in the days leading up to the assault, when supporters of then-President Donald Trump tried to stop Congress from certifying his election defeat.

This is the first time alleged participants in the attack have been charged with seditious conspiracy, which is defined as attempting "to overthrow, put down or to destroy by force the government of the United States."

"We are going to have a fight," prosecutors said Rhodes told his allies on the messaging app Signal. "That can't be avoided."

The Oath Keepers are a loosely organized group of activists who believe that the federal government is encroaching on their rights, and focus on recruiting current and former police, emergency services and military members.

Nine of the eleven charged with seditious conspiracy were already facing other charges relating to the Capitol attack. Members of the far-right Proud Boys and Three Percenters have also been charged with taking part in the attack.

ATTEMPT TO STOP TRANSFER OF POWER

The indictment says Rhodes started sending messages to his followers in November 2020, the month of Trump's election loss to Democrat Joe Biden, encouraging them to "oppose by force the lawful transfer of presidential power."

After his defeat, Trump repeatedly made false claims that his loss was a result of widespread fraud. He repeated those claims in a fiery speech near the White House before thousands of his followers stormed the Capitol in the worst attack on the seat of Congress since the War of 1812.

Prosecutors said that beginning in late December 2020, Rhodes used private encrypted communications to plan to travel to Washington on Jan. 6. He and others planned to bring weapons to help support the operation, prosecutors said.

While some of the Oath Keeper members rushed inside the building wearing tactical gear, others remained outside in what they deemed "quick-response force" teams, which were prepared to rapidly transport arms into the city, prosecutors said.

Jon Moseley, an attorney for Rhodes, told Reuters he was on the phone with Rhodes to discuss his planned appearance before the House Select Committee on Jan. 6 when the FBI called.

"He patched me in on the call and I identified myself as his lawyer," Moseley said in an e-mail. The agent then told him they were outside Rhodes' home in Granbury, Texas, and were there to arrest him.

The indictment alleges that Thomas Caldwell, who was previously charged, and Edward Vallejo of Arizona, a new defendant, were in charge of coordinating the quick-response force teams.

Seditious conspiracy is a felony carrying a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland last week vowed to hold accountable anyone involved in the attack on the Capitol. The department has charged more than 725 people with crimes arising from the attack. Of those people, about 165 have pleaded guilty and at least 70 have been sentenced. Garland said the Justice Department would "follow the facts wherever they lead."

On the day of the attack, four people died. One of them, Ashli Babbitt, was shot dead by Capitol Police while trying to break into the Speaker's Gallery. Three others died of natural causes.

The following day, Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick died. Although he had been sprayed with a chemical irritant the day of the attack, it was later determined he died of natural causes. Around 140 police officers were injured, and four police officers later died by suicide.

The Justice Department has previously obtained seditious conspiracy convictions against Puerto Rican nationalists and alleged Islamist militants including Sheikh Omar Abdel Rahman, the radical Islamic clergyman known as the "Blind Sheikh."
https://www.yahoo.com/news/fbi-arrests-far-militia-group-183728300.html
Reuters br Sarah N. Lynch and Jan Wolfe br Thu, Ja... (show quote)


All that proves is that the FBI has found 10 of the "oath keepers" that were NOT on the FBI payroll.

There is no doubt that both the "oath keepers" and the "proud boys" were saturated by undercover FBI agents

and paid "informants". There is also no doubt that the FBI was fully aware of the plans to breach the Capital,

and they purposely left the "barn door" wide open for them.

Reply
 
 
Jan 14, 2022 18:39:39   #
Milosia2 Loc: Cleveland Ohio
 
Kevyn wrote:
These clowns are similar to the blowhards here who say come and take them when they think the government is coming for their guns. Of course not one of these assclowns went down “decks awash and guns blazing” they all meekly and quietly surrendered to the feds. Some militia, a bunch of pantywaist jokers.



Reply
Jan 14, 2022 18:44:50   #
Milosia2 Loc: Cleveland Ohio
 
rumitoid wrote:
Reuters
Sarah N. Lynch and Jan Wolfe
Thu, January 13, 2022, 11:37 AM

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. prosecutors on Thursday charged the founder of the far-right Oath Keepers militia, Stewart Rhodes, and 10 alleged members of the group with seditious conspiracy for their role in the deadly Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol.

They said Rhodes had warned his group to prepare for a "bloody and desperate fight" in the days leading up to the assault, when supporters of then-President Donald Trump tried to stop Congress from certifying his election defeat.

This is the first time alleged participants in the attack have been charged with seditious conspiracy, which is defined as attempting "to overthrow, put down or to destroy by force the government of the United States."

"We are going to have a fight," prosecutors said Rhodes told his allies on the messaging app Signal. "That can't be avoided."

The Oath Keepers are a loosely organized group of activists who believe that the federal government is encroaching on their rights, and focus on recruiting current and former police, emergency services and military members.

Nine of the eleven charged with seditious conspiracy were already facing other charges relating to the Capitol attack. Members of the far-right Proud Boys and Three Percenters have also been charged with taking part in the attack.

ATTEMPT TO STOP TRANSFER OF POWER

The indictment says Rhodes started sending messages to his followers in November 2020, the month of Trump's election loss to Democrat Joe Biden, encouraging them to "oppose by force the lawful transfer of presidential power."

After his defeat, Trump repeatedly made false claims that his loss was a result of widespread fraud. He repeated those claims in a fiery speech near the White House before thousands of his followers stormed the Capitol in the worst attack on the seat of Congress since the War of 1812.

Prosecutors said that beginning in late December 2020, Rhodes used private encrypted communications to plan to travel to Washington on Jan. 6. He and others planned to bring weapons to help support the operation, prosecutors said.

While some of the Oath Keeper members rushed inside the building wearing tactical gear, others remained outside in what they deemed "quick-response force" teams, which were prepared to rapidly transport arms into the city, prosecutors said.

Jon Moseley, an attorney for Rhodes, told Reuters he was on the phone with Rhodes to discuss his planned appearance before the House Select Committee on Jan. 6 when the FBI called.

"He patched me in on the call and I identified myself as his lawyer," Moseley said in an e-mail. The agent then told him they were outside Rhodes' home in Granbury, Texas, and were there to arrest him.

The indictment alleges that Thomas Caldwell, who was previously charged, and Edward Vallejo of Arizona, a new defendant, were in charge of coordinating the quick-response force teams.

Seditious conspiracy is a felony carrying a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland last week vowed to hold accountable anyone involved in the attack on the Capitol. The department has charged more than 725 people with crimes arising from the attack. Of those people, about 165 have pleaded guilty and at least 70 have been sentenced. Garland said the Justice Department would "follow the facts wherever they lead."

On the day of the attack, four people died. One of them, Ashli Babbitt, was shot dead by Capitol Police while trying to break into the Speaker's Gallery. Three others died of natural causes.

The following day, Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick died. Although he had been sprayed with a chemical irritant the day of the attack, it was later determined he died of natural causes. Around 140 police officers were injured, and four police officers later died by suicide.

The Justice Department has previously obtained seditious conspiracy convictions against Puerto Rican nationalists and alleged Islamist militants including Sheikh Omar Abdel Rahman, the radical Islamic clergyman known as the "Blind Sheikh."
https://www.yahoo.com/news/fbi-arrests-far-militia-group-183728300.html
Reuters br Sarah N. Lynch and Jan Wolfe br Thu, Ja... (show quote)


This is Not a Conspiracy Theory !
This is conspiring to overthrow the government .
An act of felonious assault.

Reply
Jan 14, 2022 18:49:14   #
Milosia2 Loc: Cleveland Ohio
 
Gatsby wrote:
All that proves is that the FBI has found 10 of the "oath keepers" that were NOT on the FBI payroll.

There is no doubt that both the "oath keepers" and the "proud boys" were saturated by undercover FBI agents

and paid "informants". There is also no doubt that the FBI was fully aware of the plans to breach the Capital,

and they purposely left the "barn door" wide open for them.


Stuart Rhodes is a Psychopath.
Period. The Who what when where and why is inconsequential.
The man is a dangerous psychopath!

Reply
Jan 14, 2022 19:02:03   #
Smedley_buzkill
 
Milosia2 wrote:
Stuart Rhodes is a Psychopath.
Period. The Who what when where and why is inconsequential.
The man is a dangerous psychopath!


If I stated what you are I would get banned from OPP. Lots of people get indicted. This is a political witch hunt. There are miles of difference between indicted and convicted. Remember the saying you can indict a ham sandwich if you want?

Reply
 
 
Jan 14, 2022 19:38:50   #
nwtk2007 Loc: Texas
 
Milosia2 wrote:
This is Not a Conspiracy Theory !
This is conspiring to overthrow the government .
An act of felonious assault.



Reply
Jan 14, 2022 19:39:23   #
nwtk2007 Loc: Texas
 
Gatsby wrote:
All that proves is that the FBI has found 10 of the "oath keepers" that were NOT on the FBI payroll.

There is no doubt that both the "oath keepers" and the "proud boys" were saturated by undercover FBI agents

and paid "informants". There is also no doubt that the FBI was fully aware of the plans to breach the Capital,

and they purposely left the "barn door" wide open for them.



Reply
Jan 14, 2022 21:12:04   #
JFlorio Loc: Seminole Florida
 
Smedley_buzkill wrote:
If I stated what you are I would get banned from OPP. Lots of people get indicted. This is a political witch hunt. There are miles of difference between indicted and convicted. Remember the saying you can indict a ham sandwich if you want?


Easy Smedley. I honestly don’t believe she’s intelligent enough to know the difference.

Reply
Jan 15, 2022 08:39:15   #
Gatsby
 
Milosia2 wrote:
Stuart Rhodes is a Psychopath.
Period. The Who what when where and why is inconsequential.
The man is a dangerous psychopath!


Now, explain why it took an entire year for Rhodes to be indicted?

Why has such a "dangerous psychopath" been allowed to run free, for an entire year?

The FBI and DOJ had full fore knowledge of plans to breach the Capital on 1/6, and yet failed in their duty to

protect.

Why is it that no one in the FBI knows, or "can say" how many FBI AGENTS were present

in the crowd that breached the Capital grounds on 1/6?

Reply
 
 
Jan 15, 2022 10:01:29   #
JFlorio Loc: Seminole Florida
 
If you’ve ever been in a riot or an all out bar fight you know how easy it is to get a bunch of people wound up and start swinging and destroying stuff. The FBI know this also. Easy to instigate a large group with a substantial amount of pissed off dumbass’s. Everyone knows the people in charge blew it. A much larger law enforcement presence and the Jan 6th riot doesn’t happen.


Gatsby wrote:
Now, explain why it took an entire year for Rhodes to be indicted?

Why has such a "dangerous psychopath" been allowed to run free, for an entire year?

The FBI and DOJ had full fore knowledge of plans to breach the Capital on 1/6, and yet failed in their duty to

protect.

Why is it that no one in the FBI knows, or "can say" how many FBI AGENTS were present

in the crowd that breached the Capital grounds on 1/6?

Reply
Jan 15, 2022 14:04:28   #
son of witless
 
Kevyn wrote:
These clowns are similar to the blowhards here who say come and take them when they think the government is coming for their guns. Of course not one of these assclowns went down “decks awash and guns blazing” they all meekly and quietly surrendered to the feds. Some militia, a bunch of pantywaist jokers.


So you are very disappointed at the lack of bloodshed ?

Reply
Jan 15, 2022 14:56:14   #
Blade_Runner Loc: DARK SIDE OF THE MOON
 
Milosia2 wrote:
Stuart Rhodes is a Psychopath.
Period. The Who what when where and why is inconsequential.
The man is a dangerous psychopath!
Are you a psychologist? If so, how can you make such a diagnosis without actually developing a doctor/patient relationship with Stuart Rhodes?

When Oath Keepers was founded in 2009, I joined as an associate member. I stayed with them for about 2 years, received all their literature, watched many of their speeches. The majority of Oath Keeper members are military, sheriffs, and police veterans.

The Oath Keepers mission statement was simply a vow to remain loyal to their oath to support and defend the Constitution of the United States and they would not obey any orders that violated the constitution.

Taken from Secret Service and FBI documents, Newsweek reported varying estimates of the crowd size on Jan 6,
the best estimate being 25,000.

The Secret Service reported 59 separate groups were present.
Many of whom were veterans' groups.
At most, 1200 people made it to or into the Capitol building.
Many of the protestors at the tail and perimeters of the crowd had no idea an assault was taking place.

The Oath Keepers certainly did not organize, coordinate, or command the entire protest, they had their own gig going, and those charged with sedition did not represent the entire mass of people, nor did they have any influence or control over any groups other than their own.

Reply
Jan 16, 2022 02:07:25   #
nonalien1 Loc: Mojave Desert
 
Kevyn wrote:
These clowns are similar to the blowhards here who say come and take them when they think the government is coming for their guns. Of course not one of these assclowns went down “decks awash and guns blazing” they all meekly and quietly surrendered to the feds. Some militia, a bunch of pantywaist jokers.


They probably meekly surrendered because they feel they uown nothing wrong. They'll have their chance to prove it in court. Don't judge too quickly.even though they are up against a hanging judge. There is a lot of video showing what if anything they may have done. The videos may exonerate them. We'll see

Reply
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