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Oath Keeper's Leader, 10 others charged with seditious conspiracy
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Jan 13, 2022 18:09:43   #
slatten49 Loc: Lake Whitney, Texas
 
Kyle Cheney, Betsy Woodruff Swan and Josh Gerstein

Thu, January 13, 2022, 1:04 PM

The Justice Department has leveled its most serious charges yet stemming from the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, accusing the national leader of the far-right Oath Keepers militia and 10 others of seditious conspiracy by plotting to use force to block the peaceful transfer of presidential power a year ago.

Among those charged for the first time in one new grand jury indictment is Stewart Rhodes, a disbarred attorney alleged to have coordinated the attack on the Capitol who has long been of significant interest to federal prosecutors probing the insurrection by Donald Trump supporters.

Rhodes was arrested in Texas Thursday morning, the Justice Department said. The 48-page indictment begins with a description of a "plot to oppose by force the 2020 lawful transfer of presidential power."

"The purpose of the conspiracy was to oppose the lawful transfer of presidential power by force, by preventing, hindering or delaying by force the execution of the laws governing the transfer of power, including the Twelfth and Twentieth Amendments to the Constitution," the indictment reads. Among the goals of the conspiracy, prosecutors say, was "breaching and attempting to take control of the Capitol."

Prosecutors have spent months building a case against Rhodes, describing with great detail his movements even as they delayed charging him alongside 19 other Oath Keepers previously indicted for breaching the Capitol.

Rhodes was present outside the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, and there has been no public indication he entered the building. As the violent assault was underway, Rhodes was captured on video assembling his allies at a rally point outside the Capitol complex. Many of those who can be seen conversing with Rhodes were charged early last year as part of a sweeping conspiracy to halt Congress’ certification of the 2020 election.

The decision to level seditious conspiracy charges is the most significant public step the Justice Department has taken to date in its insurrection probe. Just six days after the riot, the top prosecutor handling the investigation said such charges were being considered.

“We are looking at significant felony cases tied to sedition and conspiracy,” then-acting U.S. Attorney Michael Sherwin said at a televised news conference.

However, prosecutors held off for almost exactly a year on following through on Sherwin’s words. Until a set of new indictments were handed down by a grand jury in Washington Wednesday, the highest-level charges facing defendants were obstruction and police assault.

The nature of the charges themselves cast the Jan. 6 in a far more menacing light. Seditious conspiracy charges are extremely rare. The most recent before the new charges facing the Oath Keepers came in 2010 against nine militia members who plotted a violent assault on federal authorities.

Allies of former President Donald Trump, inside and outside of Congress, have pointed to the absence of sedition charges as evidence the Capitol riot is overhyped while attempting to downplay the violence of the attack.

Among the key elements of the plot, prosecutors say, was the establishment of a “quick reaction force“ — a stockpile of firearms and other weaponry — outside of Washington D.C. that could be called in to escalate the attack.

Jonathon Moseley, an attorney who was representing Rhodes in negotiations with the Jan. 6 select committee, said he was on the phone with Rhodes discussing his strategy for the panel when the FBI arrived at Rhodes’ home and told him to come outside. Moseley said Rhodes conferenced him in on a phone call with the FBI special agent in charge.

“They called him on the phone and they asked him to come out and put his hands up to be arrested. And so obviously the first order of business with that is to make sure there’s no misunderstanding, no problem with that,” Moseley said. “They wanted to know who else was in the house.”

Moseley said he’s working to get Rhodes a criminal defense attorney who can represent him at a bail hearing. The House's Jan. 6 select committee had subpoenaed Rhodes as part of its investigation into the attack. Moseley has previously said Rhodes was likely to plead the Fifth to the panel. A spokesperson for the select committee did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Defense attorneys for already charged Oath Keepers have complained for months that the numerous anonymous references to Rhodes as an uncharged “Person One” in succeeding indictments over the riot had unduly complicated the case as trials loomed. Those attorneys also have warned that belatedly charging could roil plans for the trials.

A grand jury considering insurrection-related indictments met Wednesday, a prosecutor said in a separate hearing earlier Thursday.

Prosecutors often laid out in painstaking detail the communications Rhodes had with other members of the charged conspiracy, detailing the length of his phone calls and the content of private messages with other group members. He was typically referred to only as “Person One” in the charging documents.

Rhodes was a vocal agitator in support of Trump’s effort to overturn the election in 2020. He repeatedly and publicly warned of violence if Biden’s election were affirmed. He rallied allies in the Oath Keepers to descend on Washington and encouraged Trump to invoke the Insurrection Act in an attempt to prevent Congress from sealing President Joe Biden's victory.

On Jan. 6, 2021, his group stored weapons at a Comfort Inn in Virginia near the Capitol as part of their “quick reaction force,” federal prosecutors have alleged.

Among the men charged with seditious conspiracy are at least two photographed with Trump ally Roger Stone on Jan. 5, 2021 — Roberto Minuta and Joshua James. Stone, who has been subpoenaed by the Jan. 6 select committee, has not been accused of any wrongdoing and has disavowed any knowledge of the Oath Keepers’ intent to go to the Capitol.

Stone asserted his Fifth Amendment rights to decline to provide testimony to the select committee.

Reply
Jan 13, 2022 18:29:46   #
steve66613
 
slatten49 wrote:
Kyle Cheney, Betsy Woodruff Swan and Josh Gerstein

Thu, January 13, 2022, 1:04 PM

The Justice Department has leveled its most serious charges yet stemming from the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, accusing the national leader of the far-right Oath Keepers militia and 10 others of seditious conspiracy by plotting to use force to block the peaceful transfer of presidential power a year ago.

Among those charged for the first time in one new grand jury indictment is Stewart Rhodes, a disbarred attorney alleged to have coordinated the attack on the Capitol who has long been of significant interest to federal prosecutors probing the insurrection by Donald Trump supporters.

Rhodes was arrested in Texas Thursday morning, the Justice Department said. The 48-page indictment begins with a description of a "plot to oppose by force the 2020 lawful transfer of presidential power."

"The purpose of the conspiracy was to oppose the lawful transfer of presidential power by force, by preventing, hindering or delaying by force the execution of the laws governing the transfer of power, including the Twelfth and Twentieth Amendments to the Constitution," the indictment reads. Among the goals of the conspiracy, prosecutors say, was "breaching and attempting to take control of the Capitol."

Prosecutors have spent months building a case against Rhodes, describing with great detail his movements even as they delayed charging him alongside 19 other Oath Keepers previously indicted for breaching the Capitol.

Rhodes was present outside the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, and there has been no public indication he entered the building. As the violent assault was underway, Rhodes was captured on video assembling his allies at a rally point outside the Capitol complex. Many of those who can be seen conversing with Rhodes were charged early last year as part of a sweeping conspiracy to halt Congress’ certification of the 2020 election.

The decision to level seditious conspiracy charges is the most significant public step the Justice Department has taken to date in its insurrection probe. Just six days after the riot, the top prosecutor handling the investigation said such charges were being considered.

“We are looking at significant felony cases tied to sedition and conspiracy,” then-acting U.S. Attorney Michael Sherwin said at a televised news conference.

However, prosecutors held off for almost exactly a year on following through on Sherwin’s words. Until a set of new indictments were handed down by a grand jury in Washington Wednesday, the highest-level charges facing defendants were obstruction and police assault.

The nature of the charges themselves cast the Jan. 6 in a far more menacing light. Seditious conspiracy charges are extremely rare. The most recent before the new charges facing the Oath Keepers came in 2010 against nine militia members who plotted a violent assault on federal authorities.

Allies of former President Donald Trump, inside and outside of Congress, have pointed to the absence of sedition charges as evidence the Capitol riot is overhyped while attempting to downplay the violence of the attack.

Among the key elements of the plot, prosecutors say, was the establishment of a “quick reaction force“ — a stockpile of firearms and other weaponry — outside of Washington D.C. that could be called in to escalate the attack.

Jonathon Moseley, an attorney who was representing Rhodes in negotiations with the Jan. 6 select committee, said he was on the phone with Rhodes discussing his strategy for the panel when the FBI arrived at Rhodes’ home and told him to come outside. Moseley said Rhodes conferenced him in on a phone call with the FBI special agent in charge.

“They called him on the phone and they asked him to come out and put his hands up to be arrested. And so obviously the first order of business with that is to make sure there’s no misunderstanding, no problem with that,” Moseley said. “They wanted to know who else was in the house.”

Moseley said he’s working to get Rhodes a criminal defense attorney who can represent him at a bail hearing. The House's Jan. 6 select committee had subpoenaed Rhodes as part of its investigation into the attack. Moseley has previously said Rhodes was likely to plead the Fifth to the panel. A spokesperson for the select committee did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Defense attorneys for already charged Oath Keepers have complained for months that the numerous anonymous references to Rhodes as an uncharged “Person One” in succeeding indictments over the riot had unduly complicated the case as trials loomed. Those attorneys also have warned that belatedly charging could roil plans for the trials.

A grand jury considering insurrection-related indictments met Wednesday, a prosecutor said in a separate hearing earlier Thursday.

Prosecutors often laid out in painstaking detail the communications Rhodes had with other members of the charged conspiracy, detailing the length of his phone calls and the content of private messages with other group members. He was typically referred to only as “Person One” in the charging documents.

Rhodes was a vocal agitator in support of Trump’s effort to overturn the election in 2020. He repeatedly and publicly warned of violence if Biden’s election were affirmed. He rallied allies in the Oath Keepers to descend on Washington and encouraged Trump to invoke the Insurrection Act in an attempt to prevent Congress from sealing President Joe Biden's victory.

On Jan. 6, 2021, his group stored weapons at a Comfort Inn in Virginia near the Capitol as part of their “quick reaction force,” federal prosecutors have alleged.

Among the men charged with seditious conspiracy are at least two photographed with Trump ally Roger Stone on Jan. 5, 2021 — Roberto Minuta and Joshua James. Stone, who has been subpoenaed by the Jan. 6 select committee, has not been accused of any wrongdoing and has disavowed any knowledge of the Oath Keepers’ intent to go to the Capitol.

Stone asserted his Fifth Amendment rights to decline to provide testimony to the select committee.
Kyle Cheney, Betsy Woodruff Swan and Josh Gerstein... (show quote)


Can you spell Tiananmen Square?

If Heels Up Harris needs an event to compare with Jan. 6th…..

Of course, in Tiananmen Square, the government killed more than one unarmed military veteran.

Reply
Jan 13, 2022 18:34:49   #
Peaver Bogart Loc: Montana
 
slatten49 wrote:
Kyle Cheney, Betsy Woodruff Swan and Josh Gerstein

Thu, January 13, 2022, 1:04 PM

The Justice Department has leveled its most serious charges yet stemming from the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, accusing the national leader of the far-right Oath Keepers militia and 10 others of seditious conspiracy by plotting to use force to block the peaceful transfer of presidential power a year ago.

Among those charged for the first time in one new grand jury indictment is Stewart Rhodes, a disbarred attorney alleged to have coordinated the attack on the Capitol who has long been of significant interest to federal prosecutors probing the insurrection by Donald Trump supporters.

Rhodes was arrested in Texas Thursday morning, the Justice Department said. The 48-page indictment begins with a description of a "plot to oppose by force the 2020 lawful transfer of presidential power."

"The purpose of the conspiracy was to oppose the lawful transfer of presidential power by force, by preventing, hindering or delaying by force the execution of the laws governing the transfer of power, including the Twelfth and Twentieth Amendments to the Constitution," the indictment reads. Among the goals of the conspiracy, prosecutors say, was "breaching and attempting to take control of the Capitol."

Prosecutors have spent months building a case against Rhodes, describing with great detail his movements even as they delayed charging him alongside 19 other Oath Keepers previously indicted for breaching the Capitol.

Rhodes was present outside the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, and there has been no public indication he entered the building. As the violent assault was underway, Rhodes was captured on video assembling his allies at a rally point outside the Capitol complex. Many of those who can be seen conversing with Rhodes were charged early last year as part of a sweeping conspiracy to halt Congress’ certification of the 2020 election.

The decision to level seditious conspiracy charges is the most significant public step the Justice Department has taken to date in its insurrection probe. Just six days after the riot, the top prosecutor handling the investigation said such charges were being considered.

“We are looking at significant felony cases tied to sedition and conspiracy,” then-acting U.S. Attorney Michael Sherwin said at a televised news conference.

However, prosecutors held off for almost exactly a year on following through on Sherwin’s words. Until a set of new indictments were handed down by a grand jury in Washington Wednesday, the highest-level charges facing defendants were obstruction and police assault.

The nature of the charges themselves cast the Jan. 6 in a far more menacing light. Seditious conspiracy charges are extremely rare. The most recent before the new charges facing the Oath Keepers came in 2010 against nine militia members who plotted a violent assault on federal authorities.

Allies of former President Donald Trump, inside and outside of Congress, have pointed to the absence of sedition charges as evidence the Capitol riot is overhyped while attempting to downplay the violence of the attack.

Among the key elements of the plot, prosecutors say, was the establishment of a “quick reaction force“ — a stockpile of firearms and other weaponry — outside of Washington D.C. that could be called in to escalate the attack.

Jonathon Moseley, an attorney who was representing Rhodes in negotiations with the Jan. 6 select committee, said he was on the phone with Rhodes discussing his strategy for the panel when the FBI arrived at Rhodes’ home and told him to come outside. Moseley said Rhodes conferenced him in on a phone call with the FBI special agent in charge.

“They called him on the phone and they asked him to come out and put his hands up to be arrested. And so obviously the first order of business with that is to make sure there’s no misunderstanding, no problem with that,” Moseley said. “They wanted to know who else was in the house.”

Moseley said he’s working to get Rhodes a criminal defense attorney who can represent him at a bail hearing. The House's Jan. 6 select committee had subpoenaed Rhodes as part of its investigation into the attack. Moseley has previously said Rhodes was likely to plead the Fifth to the panel. A spokesperson for the select committee did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Defense attorneys for already charged Oath Keepers have complained for months that the numerous anonymous references to Rhodes as an uncharged “Person One” in succeeding indictments over the riot had unduly complicated the case as trials loomed. Those attorneys also have warned that belatedly charging could roil plans for the trials.

A grand jury considering insurrection-related indictments met Wednesday, a prosecutor said in a separate hearing earlier Thursday.

Prosecutors often laid out in painstaking detail the communications Rhodes had with other members of the charged conspiracy, detailing the length of his phone calls and the content of private messages with other group members. He was typically referred to only as “Person One” in the charging documents.

Rhodes was a vocal agitator in support of Trump’s effort to overturn the election in 2020. He repeatedly and publicly warned of violence if Biden’s election were affirmed. He rallied allies in the Oath Keepers to descend on Washington and encouraged Trump to invoke the Insurrection Act in an attempt to prevent Congress from sealing President Joe Biden's victory.

On Jan. 6, 2021, his group stored weapons at a Comfort Inn in Virginia near the Capitol as part of their “quick reaction force,” federal prosecutors have alleged.

Among the men charged with seditious conspiracy are at least two photographed with Trump ally Roger Stone on Jan. 5, 2021 — Roberto Minuta and Joshua James. Stone, who has been subpoenaed by the Jan. 6 select committee, has not been accused of any wrongdoing and has disavowed any knowledge of the Oath Keepers’ intent to go to the Capitol.

Stone asserted his Fifth Amendment rights to decline to provide testimony to the select committee.
Kyle Cheney, Betsy Woodruff Swan and Josh Gerstein... (show quote)


You took a solemn oath when you joined the Marine Corp. Are you saying you no longer keep that oath?

Reply
 
 
Jan 13, 2022 18:40:53   #
slatten49 Loc: Lake Whitney, Texas
 
Peaver Bogart wrote:
You took a solemn oath when you joined the Marine Corp. Are you saying you no longer keep that oath?

I damn well keep it, and have for the past 56 years.

Reply
Jan 13, 2022 18:47:03   #
Peaver Bogart Loc: Montana
 
slatten49 wrote:
I damn well keep it, and have for the past 56 years.


And I have kept mine for 59 years, but you seem to disparage the Oath Keepers.

Reply
Jan 13, 2022 18:50:15   #
Michael10
 
Peaver Bogart wrote:
You took a solemn oath when you joined the Marine Corp. Are you saying you no longer keep that oath?


So you think it's ok for citizens to try and stop congress from counting electoral votes??? If so you are not a friend to Democracy or this country.

Reply
Jan 13, 2022 18:54:08   #
Peaver Bogart Loc: Montana
 
Michael10 wrote:
So you think it's ok for citizens to try and stop the congress fro counting votes??? If so you are not a friend to Democracy or this country.


No, I don't think it's ok for citizens to stop Congress from counting LEGAL votes. However every citizen should do what they can to stop ILLEGAL votes.

Reply
 
 
Jan 13, 2022 18:56:10   #
Peaver Bogart Loc: Montana
 
Michael10 wrote:
So you think it's ok for citizens to try and stop congress from counting electoral votes??? If so you are not a friend to Democracy or this country.


Does the phrase "All Enemies Foreign and Domestic" ring a bell?

Reply
Jan 13, 2022 18:57:24   #
Michael10
 
Peaver Bogart wrote:
No, I don't think it's ok for citizens to stop Congress from counting LEGAL votes. However every citizen should do what they can to stop ILLEGAL votes.


And just WHO decides which votes are illegal because the state voting authorities nation wide say there wasn't enough fraud to change the election. Only hard headed people who only listen to the voices in their heads still think there was fraud.

Reply
Jan 13, 2022 19:03:59   #
Peaver Bogart Loc: Montana
 
Michael10 wrote:
And just WHO decides which votes are illegal because the state voting authorities nation wide say there wasn't enough fraud to change the election. Only hard headed people who only listen to the voices in their heads still think there was fraud.


The voices are coming from a plethora of investigators, but most of the Judges and their administration responsible for the fraud seem to have peanut butter in their ears.

Reply
Jan 13, 2022 19:23:16   #
slatten49 Loc: Lake Whitney, Texas
 
Peaver Bogart wrote:
And I have kept mine for 59 years, but you seem to disparage the Oath Keepers.

I cut 'n pasted an article about the Oath Keepers that spoke of their being in the news.

Reply
 
 
Jan 13, 2022 19:27:04   #
slatten49 Loc: Lake Whitney, Texas
 
Peaver Bogart wrote:
The voices are coming from a plethora of investigators, but most of the Judges and their administration responsible for the fraud seem to have peanut butter in their ears.

It more appears that you and others who buy into the 'Big Lie' are the ones with peanut butter in their ears.

Reply
Jan 13, 2022 19:30:34   #
4430 Loc: Little Egypt ** Southern Illinory
 
Michael10 wrote:
And just WHO decides which votes are illegal because the state voting authorities nation wide say there wasn't enough fraud to change the election. Only hard headed people who only listen to the voices in their heads still think there was fraud.


Might not hurt to have the voices in your head analyzed

Reply
Jan 13, 2022 19:33:14   #
slatten49 Loc: Lake Whitney, Texas
 
Peaver Bogart wrote:
You took a solemn oath when you joined the Marine Corp. Are you saying you no longer keep that oath?

James Mattis joined the Marine Corps in, just as I was released from active duty upon returning from Viet Nam. He is one of the most revered USMC leaders in its history. I have always admired/respected the man. I dare to say he has also kept his oath. His words below spoke of the real threat to our constitutional democratic republic, then and now.

On June 4th, 2020, President Donald Trump's first secretary of defense, retired Marine Gen. James Mattis, said in a remarkable 650-word statement that the President was actively trying to divide the country and urged Americans to unite without him. (Eighty-one million of us did in November, 2020)

Mattis had avoided directly criticizing Trump since his leaving in December 2018, but that changed after the administration used strong-arm tactics and dispatched authorities in riot gear to clear peaceful protesters in front of the White House this week so Trump could hold a photo op. Mattis, once the loyal general, unloaded on Trump and his threat to use the military to patrol US streets, which Mattis said would create a dangerous tension between the nation's citizens and the troops who are meant to protect them.

Below is a close look at Mattis's carefully chosen words along with comments from two other former top generals who have all condemned Trump in recent days.

I have watched this week's unfolding events, angry and appalled. The words "Equal Justice Under Law" are carved in the pediment of the United States Supreme Court.

This is precisely what protesters are rightly demanding. It is a wholesome and unifying demand—one that all of us should be able to get behind.

Mattis opens his statement acknowledging that equal justice is a key promise of this country, an immediate contrast to Trump, who has sought to portray protesters as villains.

We must not be distracted by a small number of lawbreakers. The protests are defined by tens of thousands of people of conscience who are insisting that we live up to our values—our values as people and our values as a nation.

While Trump has tried to paint the protesters as criminals, Mattis immediately establishes that most of the protesters are making a valid and peaceful point about the failings of our country.

When I joined the military, some 50 years ago, I swore an oath to support and defend the Constitution. Every government employee except the President takes this oath, which is in US law. It reads: "I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God."

Never did I dream that troops taking that same oath would be ordered under any circumstance to violate the Constitutional rights of their fellow citizens—much less to provide a bizarre photo op for the elected commander-in-chief, with military leadership standing alongside.

The First Amendment says Congress shall make no law "abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."
The photo op was bizarre indeed. Trump, alongside his Defense Secretary Mark Esper, walked through Lafayette Square after it was cleared by police of peaceful protesters to hold a massive Bible aloft in front of a church.
We must reject any thinking of our cities as a "battlespace" that our uniformed military is called upon to "dominate."

This is a direct rebuke of Esper, who used that term - "battlespace" - to refer to cities. He later argued it is part of the military lexicon.

At home, we should use our military only when requested to do so, on very rare occasions, by state governors. Militarizing our response, as we witnessed in Washington, D.C., sets up a conflict—a false conflict—between the military and civilian society. It erodes the moral ground that ensures a trusted bond between men and women in uniform and the society they are sworn to protect, and of which they themselves are a part. Keeping public order rests with civilian state and local leaders who best understand their communities and are answerable to them.
The military has only been used in US streets very rarely, most recently in Los Angeles in 1992. Trump can deploy the military to Washington, because it is a federal city and not party of a state. During the Civil Rights era, presidents used the Insurrection Act, an 1807 law, and deployed the military over the objections of governors. But Mattis argues here that the divide between civilian law enforcement and the military is part of the bedrock of US society.

James Madison wrote in Federalist 14 that "America united with a handful of troops, or without a single soldier, exhibits a more forbidding posture to foreign ambition than America disunited, with a hundred thousand veterans ready for combat."

We do not need to militarize our response to protests. We need to unite around a common purpose. And it starts by guaranteeing that all of us are equal before the law.

The difference between a posture of unity and Trump's, which was a demand that governors "dominate" protesters, cannot be overstated.

Instructions given by the military departments to our troops before the Normandy invasion reminded soldiers that "The Nazi slogan for destroying us...was 'Divide and Conquer.' Our American answer is 'In Union there is Strength.'" We must summon that unity to surmount this crisis—confident that we are better than our politics.

Donald Trump is the first president in my lifetime who does not try to unite the American people—does not even pretend to try. Instead he tries to divide us. We are witnessing the consequences of three years of this deliberate effort. We are witnessing the consequences of three years without mature leadership.

Note that Mattis invokes the Nazi "divide and conquer" slogan moments before saying Trump is seeking to the divide the US.

We can unite without him, drawing on the strengths inherent in our civil society. This will not be easy, as the past few days have shown, but we owe it to our fellow citizens; to past generations that bled to defend our promise; and to our children. We can come through this trying time stronger, and with a renewed sense of purpose and respect for one another.

The structure of US society is stronger than Trump, Mattis suggests. But clearly Trump tests it.

The pandemic has shown us that it is not only our troops who are willing to offer the ultimate sacrifice for the safety of the community. Americans in hospitals, grocery stores, post offices, and elsewhere have put their lives on the line in order to serve their fellow citizens and their country.

We know that we are better than the abuse of executive authority that we witnessed in Lafayette Square. We must reject and hold accountable those in office who would make a mockery of our Constitution.

Mattis accuses his former boss of abusing power, the ultimate transgression for a President, whose power rests with the American electorate.

At the same time, we must remember Lincoln's "better angels," and listen to them, as we work to unite.
Only by adopting a new path—which means, in truth, returning to the original path of our founding ideals—will we again be a country admired and respected at home and abroad.

Lincoln closed his first inaugural address, just before the breakout of the Civil War, with an entreaty to the South not to secede.

A longer excerpt of the speech is worth reading: "In your hands, my dissatisfied fellow-countrymen, and not in mine, is the momentous issue of civil war. The Government will not assail you. You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressors. You have no oath registered in heaven to destroy the Government, while I shall have the most solemn one to "preserve, protect, and defend it. I am loath to close. We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature." But the Civil War did come and the first shots were fired a month after Lincoln delivered this speech. Years later, as the war was closing, after hundreds of thousands of Americans had died, Lincoln gave his second inaugural address, which was focused on healing and forgiveness "with malice toward none and charity for all."

https://www.bing.com/search?q=jamesmattis&cvid=291d8e9009a14a23ad84f8e371198ac2&aqs=edge..69i57.4979j0j4&FORM=ANAB01&PC=HCTS

Reply
Jan 13, 2022 19:39:26   #
archie bunker Loc: Texas
 
Michael10 wrote:
And just WHO decides which votes are illegal because the state voting authorities nation wide say there wasn't enough fraud to change the election. Only hard headed people who only listen to the voices in their heads still think there was fraud.


Your post contradicts itself.

First you say there wasn't enough fraud to change the election. Admitting that there was fraud involved.
Then you go on to say that only people listening to voices in their heads think there was fraud in the election.
Are you listening to voices?
Apparently so.

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