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What it means to be a Patriot
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Oct 12, 2021 17:42:29   #
slatten49 Loc: Lake Whitney, Texas
 
By columnist John C. Morgan...October 6, 2021 .

The words “my country, right or wrong” are used often to express allegiance to a nation no matter what it does. It was first proposed as a toast but later amended by Carl Schurz in an 1872 U.S. Senate speech: “My country, right or wrong; if right, to be kept right, and if wrong, to be set right.”

Patriotism means supporting the country when it lives up to the values expressed in its reason for being but also helping to set it right when it violates the principles expressed in its Constitution and Bill of Rights.

I honor the patriots who serve others. Remembering the events of Sept. 11, 2001, I recall those first responders who rushed into the burning towers to rescue others or those 40 passengers and crew members of United Airlines Flight 93 who sought to thwart a planned attack on our capital.

In many ways and places there are patriots who sacrifice their own comfort to serve others. I think of the many health care workers who serve victims of COVID-19 in hospitals. I recall teachers who remain in classrooms to teach children. I think of politicians who (should) put the country before their re-elections. And I think of countless others who day by day help us — from mail carriers to store clerks.

George Orwell, an English journalist and author of the novel, 1984, wrote: “By ‘patriotism’ I mean devotion to a particular place and a particular way of life, which one believes to be the best in the world but has no wish to force on other people. Patriotism is of its nature defensive, both militarily and culturally. Nationalism, on the other hand, is inseparable from the desire for power. The abiding purpose of every nationalist is to secure more power and more prestige, not for himself but for the nation or other unit in which he has chosen to sink his own individuality.”

Patriotism depends on unity of purpose, people of quite different political or religious views who pledge allegiance to “one nation, with liberty and justice for all.” True patriots see their responsibility not only to their own needs but the community needs as well.

President George Washington in his farewell address warned us about party politics: “The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge natural to party dissension … is itself a frightful despotism … In governments purely elective, a spirit of party is not to be encouraged … a fire not to be quenched, it demands a uniform vigilance to prevent its bursting into a flame, lest, instead of warming, it should consume.”

Speaking at a Flight 93 memorial service September 11, President George W. Bush recalled the unity of purpose most felt after the tragedy but also issued this warning about the present time in our national history from those within our country with a “disdain for pluralism, in their disregard for human life, in their determination to defile national symbols…”

I think the words of President John F. Kennedy at his 1961 inauguration address might help heal our wounds and draw out our better angels: “Ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country”.

I believe we are at a (long past) point in our history when we need to think and act about what is best for our country, adherence to our constitutional norms, not sacrificing them to enhance our desires.

Reply
Oct 12, 2021 17:52:30   #
American Vet
 
slatten49 wrote:
By columnist John C. Morgan...October 6, 2021 .

The words “my country, right or wrong” are used often to express allegiance to a nation no matter what it does. It was first proposed as a toast but later amended by Carl Schurz in an 1872 U.S. Senate speech: “My country, right or wrong; if right, to be kept right, and if wrong, to be set right.”

Patriotism means supporting the country when it lives up to the values expressed in its reason for being but also helping to set it right when it violates the principles expressed in its Constitution and Bill of Rights.

I honor the patriots who serve others. Remembering the events of Sept. 11, 2001, I recall those first responders who rushed into the burning towers to rescue others or those 40 passengers and crew members of United Airlines Flight 93 who sought to thwart a planned attack on our capital.

In many ways and places there are patriots who sacrifice their own comfort to serve others. I think of the many health care workers who serve victims of COVID-19 in hospitals. I recall teachers who remain in classrooms to teach children. I think of politicians who (should) put the country before their re-elections. And I think of countless others who day by day help us — from mail carriers to store clerks.

George Orwell, an English journalist and author of the novel, 1984, wrote: “By ‘patriotism’ I mean devotion to a particular place and a particular way of life, which one believes to be the best in the world but has no wish to force on other people. Patriotism is of its nature defensive, both militarily and culturally. Nationalism, on the other hand, is inseparable from the desire for power. The abiding purpose of every nationalist is to secure more power and more prestige, not for himself but for the nation or other unit in which he has chosen to sink his own individuality.”

Patriotism depends on unity of purpose, people of quite different political or religious views who pledge allegiance to “one nation, with liberty and justice for all.” True patriots see their responsibility not only to their own needs but the community needs as well.

President George Washington in his farewell address warned us about party politics: “The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge natural to party dissension … is itself a frightful despotism … In governments purely elective, a spirit of party is not to be encouraged … a fire not to be quenched, it demands a uniform vigilance to prevent its bursting into a flame, lest, instead of warming, it should consume.”

Speaking at a Flight 93 memorial service September 11, President George W. Bush recalled the unity of purpose most felt after the tragedy but also issued this warning about the present time in our national history from those within our country with a “disdain for pluralism, in their disregard for human life, in their determination to defile national symbols…”

I think the words of President John F. Kennedy at his 1961 inauguration address might help heal our wounds and draw out our better angels: “Ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country”.

I believe we are at a (long past) point in our history when we need to think and act about what is best for our country, adherence to our constitutional norms, not sacrificing them to enhance our desires.
By columnist John C. Morgan...October 6, 2021 . br... (show quote)


Nice article.

Especially the last sentence - that needs to be carefully read by everyone (especially the leftist in our country.

Reply
Oct 12, 2021 18:11:59   #
LogicallyRight Loc: Chicago
 
American Vet wrote:
Nice article.

Especially the last sentence - that needs to be carefully read by everyone (especially the leftist in our country.


***Especially the last sentence - that needs to be carefully read by everyone (especially the leftist in our country.
>>>We can't even get the leftists on OPP to read anything like that through to the finish.

Reply
 
 
Oct 12, 2021 18:16:09   #
lpnmajor Loc: Arkansas
 
slatten49 wrote:
By columnist John C. Morgan...October 6, 2021 .

The words “my country, right or wrong” are used often to express allegiance to a nation no matter what it does. It was first proposed as a toast but later amended by Carl Schurz in an 1872 U.S. Senate speech: “My country, right or wrong; if right, to be kept right, and if wrong, to be set right.”

Patriotism means supporting the country when it lives up to the values expressed in its reason for being but also helping to set it right when it violates the principles expressed in its Constitution and Bill of Rights.

I honor the patriots who serve others. Remembering the events of Sept. 11, 2001, I recall those first responders who rushed into the burning towers to rescue others or those 40 passengers and crew members of United Airlines Flight 93 who sought to thwart a planned attack on our capital.

In many ways and places there are patriots who sacrifice their own comfort to serve others. I think of the many health care workers who serve victims of COVID-19 in hospitals. I recall teachers who remain in classrooms to teach children. I think of politicians who (should) put the country before their re-elections. And I think of countless others who day by day help us — from mail carriers to store clerks.

George Orwell, an English journalist and author of the novel, 1984, wrote: “By ‘patriotism’ I mean devotion to a particular place and a particular way of life, which one believes to be the best in the world but has no wish to force on other people. Patriotism is of its nature defensive, both militarily and culturally. Nationalism, on the other hand, is inseparable from the desire for power. The abiding purpose of every nationalist is to secure more power and more prestige, not for himself but for the nation or other unit in which he has chosen to sink his own individuality.”

Patriotism depends on unity of purpose, people of quite different political or religious views who pledge allegiance to “one nation, with liberty and justice for all.” True patriots see their responsibility not only to their own needs but the community needs as well.

President George Washington in his farewell address warned us about party politics: “The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge natural to party dissension … is itself a frightful despotism … In governments purely elective, a spirit of party is not to be encouraged … a fire not to be quenched, it demands a uniform vigilance to prevent its bursting into a flame, lest, instead of warming, it should consume.”

Speaking at a Flight 93 memorial service September 11, President George W. Bush recalled the unity of purpose most felt after the tragedy but also issued this warning about the present time in our national history from those within our country with a “disdain for pluralism, in their disregard for human life, in their determination to defile national symbols…”

I think the words of President John F. Kennedy at his 1961 inauguration address might help heal our wounds and draw out our better angels: “Ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country”.

I believe we are at a (long past) point in our history when we need to think and act about what is best for our country, adherence to our constitutional norms, not sacrificing them to enhance our desires.
By columnist John C. Morgan...October 6, 2021 . br... (show quote)


Some people confuse authoritarianism ( do what I say because I know best ) for patriotism.

Reply
Oct 12, 2021 18:18:02   #
Carol Kelly
 
slatten49 wrote:
By columnist John C. Morgan...October 6, 2021 .

The words “my country, right or wrong” are used often to express allegiance to a nation no matter what it does. It was first proposed as a toast but later amended by Carl Schurz in an 1872 U.S. Senate speech: “My country, right or wrong; if right, to be kept right, and if wrong, to be set right.”

Patriotism means supporting the country when it lives up to the values expressed in its reason for being but also helping to set it right when it violates the principles expressed in its Constitution and Bill of Rights.

I honor the patriots who serve others. Remembering the events of Sept. 11, 2001, I recall those first responders who rushed into the burning towers to rescue others or those 40 passengers and crew members of United Airlines Flight 93 who sought to thwart a planned attack on our capital.

In many ways and places there are patriots who sacrifice their own comfort to serve others. I think of the many health care workers who serve victims of COVID-19 in hospitals. I recall teachers who remain in classrooms to teach children. I think of politicians who (should) put the country before their re-elections. And I think of countless others who day by day help us — from mail carriers to store clerks.

George Orwell, an English journalist and author of the novel, 1984, wrote: “By ‘patriotism’ I mean devotion to a particular place and a particular way of life, which one believes to be the best in the world but has no wish to force on other people. Patriotism is of its nature defensive, both militarily and culturally. Nationalism, on the other hand, is inseparable from the desire for power. The abiding purpose of every nationalist is to secure more power and more prestige, not for himself but for the nation or other unit in which he has chosen to sink his own individuality.”

Patriotism depends on unity of purpose, people of quite different political or religious views who pledge allegiance to “one nation, with liberty and justice for all.” True patriots see their responsibility not only to their own needs but the community needs as well.

President George Washington in his farewell address warned us about party politics: “The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge natural to party dissension … is itself a frightful despotism … In governments purely elective, a spirit of party is not to be encouraged … a fire not to be quenched, it demands a uniform vigilance to prevent its bursting into a flame, lest, instead of warming, it should consume.”

Speaking at a Flight 93 memorial service September 11, President George W. Bush recalled the unity of purpose most felt after the tragedy but also issued this warning about the present time in our national history from those within our country with a “disdain for pluralism, in their disregard for human life, in their determination to defile national symbols…”

I think the words of President John F. Kennedy at his 1961 inauguration address might help heal our wounds and draw out our better angels: “Ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country”.

I believe we are at a (long past) point in our history when we need to think and act about what is best for our country, adherence to our constitutional norms, not sacrificing them to enhance our desires.
By columnist John C. Morgan...October 6, 2021 . br... (show quote)

Reply
Oct 12, 2021 18:19:39   #
Carol Kelly
 
lpnmajor wrote:
Some people confuse authoritarianism ( do what I say because I know best ) for patriotism.


Who are these people?

Reply
Oct 12, 2021 20:18:44   #
Sonny Magoo Loc: If you ain't Dutch you ain't much.
 
Carol Kelly wrote:
Who are these people?


Gee...I wonder 🤔

Reply
 
 
Oct 12, 2021 20:48:01   #
archie bunker Loc: Texas
 
slatten49 wrote:
By columnist John C. Morgan...October 6, 2021 .

The words “my country, right or wrong” are used often to express allegiance to a nation no matter what it does. It was first proposed as a toast but later amended by Carl Schurz in an 1872 U.S. Senate speech: “My country, right or wrong; if right, to be kept right, and if wrong, to be set right.”

Patriotism means supporting the country when it lives up to the values expressed in its reason for being but also helping to set it right when it violates the principles expressed in its Constitution and Bill of Rights.

I honor the patriots who serve others. Remembering the events of Sept. 11, 2001, I recall those first responders who rushed into the burning towers to rescue others or those 40 passengers and crew members of United Airlines Flight 93 who sought to thwart a planned attack on our capital.

In many ways and places there are patriots who sacrifice their own comfort to serve others. I think of the many health care workers who serve victims of COVID-19 in hospitals. I recall teachers who remain in classrooms to teach children. I think of politicians who (should) put the country before their re-elections. And I think of countless others who day by day help us — from mail carriers to store clerks.

George Orwell, an English journalist and author of the novel, 1984, wrote: “By ‘patriotism’ I mean devotion to a particular place and a particular way of life, which one believes to be the best in the world but has no wish to force on other people. Patriotism is of its nature defensive, both militarily and culturally. Nationalism, on the other hand, is inseparable from the desire for power. The abiding purpose of every nationalist is to secure more power and more prestige, not for himself but for the nation or other unit in which he has chosen to sink his own individuality.”

Patriotism depends on unity of purpose, people of quite different political or religious views who pledge allegiance to “one nation, with liberty and justice for all.” True patriots see their responsibility not only to their own needs but the community needs as well.

President George Washington in his farewell address warned us about party politics: “The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge natural to party dissension … is itself a frightful despotism … In governments purely elective, a spirit of party is not to be encouraged … a fire not to be quenched, it demands a uniform vigilance to prevent its bursting into a flame, lest, instead of warming, it should consume.”

Speaking at a Flight 93 memorial service September 11, President George W. Bush recalled the unity of purpose most felt after the tragedy but also issued this warning about the present time in our national history from those within our country with a “disdain for pluralism, in their disregard for human life, in their determination to defile national symbols…”

I think the words of President John F. Kennedy at his 1961 inauguration address might help heal our wounds and draw out our better angels: “Ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country”.

I believe we are at a (long past) point in our history when we need to think and act about what is best for our country, adherence to our constitutional norms, not sacrificing them to enhance our desires.
By columnist John C. Morgan...October 6, 2021 . br... (show quote)


Well Slatts, I'll tell ya what. I'm just about fed up with all of these labels we seem to hafta wear now.
Am I a patriot? I reckon I am. Do other people think so? I don't give a shit.
I'm a Texan/American, heterosexual, white male who busts his ass for his family, and others. I believe there are 2 genders, and marriage is between one man, and one woman. Eh.........not gonna rant off on ya here......hang on a sec.....gotta pee.....alright, I'm back, where was I? Oh yeah, the Patriot thing.
According to the writer of this article, I am, because I've carried mail throughout this whole shitshow without missing a day. I've done it day, night, and through all of the gawdawful weather.

Rain, sleet, snow, wind, dark of night, dog attacks, dumbasses, management, these couriers.......well, however that thing goes.
Sounds nobel, and all, but whoever wrote that crap needs to be dug up, and re-killed!

There's my half cent!!

Have a good evening Slat!👍

Reply
Oct 12, 2021 20:50:45   #
Coos Bay Tom Loc: coos bay oregon
 
American Vet wrote:
Nice article.

Especially the last sentence - that needs to be carefully read by everyone (especially the leftist in our country.


Patriotism and devotion to our country is not exclusively a right leaning virtue ,

Reply
Oct 12, 2021 20:52:34   #
Coos Bay Tom Loc: coos bay oregon
 
archie bunker wrote:
Well Slatts, I'll tell ya what. I'm just about fed up with all of these labels we seem to hafta wear now.
Am I a patriot? I reckon I am. Do other people think so? I don't give a shit.
I'm a Texan/American, heterosexual, white male who busts his ass for his family, and others. I believe there are 2 genders, and marriage is between one man, and one woman. Eh.........not gonna rant off on ya here......hang on a sec.....gotta pee.....alright, I'm back, where was I? Oh yeah, the Patriot thing.
According to the writer of this article, I am, because I've carried mail throughout this whole shitshow without missing a day. I've done it day, night, and through all of the gawdawful weather.

Rain, sleet, snow, wind, dark of night, dog attacks, dumbasses, management, these couriers.......well, however that thing goes.
Sounds nobel, and all, but whoever wrote that crap needs to be dug up, and re-killed!

There's my half cent!!

Have a good evening Slat!👍
Well Slatts, I'll tell ya what. I'm just about fed... (show quote)


You could be a pony express rider.-- actually I would like to do that.

Reply
Oct 12, 2021 20:54:47   #
Milosia2 Loc: Cleveland Ohio
 
American Vet wrote:
Nice article.

Especially the last sentence - that needs to be carefully read by everyone (especially the leftist in our country.


Sit down , you don’t get the high ground on this one .

Reply
 
 
Oct 12, 2021 20:55:32   #
archie bunker Loc: Texas
 
Coos Bay Tom wrote:
You could be a pony express rider.-- actually I would like to do that.


I would have done that back in the day!

Reply
Oct 12, 2021 20:57:19   #
Coos Bay Tom Loc: coos bay oregon
 
archie bunker wrote:
I would have done that back in the day!


Me too

Reply
Oct 12, 2021 23:23:33   #
Weasel Loc: In the Great State Of Indiana!!
 
slatten49 wrote:
By columnist John C. Morgan...October 6, 2021 .

The words “my country, right or wrong” are used often to express allegiance to a nation no matter what it does. It was first proposed as a toast but later amended by Carl Schurz in an 1872 U.S. Senate speech: “My country, right or wrong; if right, to be kept right, and if wrong, to be set right.”

Patriotism means supporting the country when it lives up to the values expressed in its reason for being but also helping to set it right when it violates the principles expressed in its Constitution and Bill of Rights.

I honor the patriots who serve others. Remembering the events of Sept. 11, 2001, I recall those first responders who rushed into the burning towers to rescue others or those 40 passengers and crew members of United Airlines Flight 93 who sought to thwart a planned attack on our capital.

In many ways and places there are patriots who sacrifice their own comfort to serve others. I think of the many health care workers who serve victims of COVID-19 in hospitals. I recall teachers who remain in classrooms to teach children. I think of politicians who (should) put the country before their re-elections. And I think of countless others who day by day help us — from mail carriers to store clerks.

George Orwell, an English journalist and author of the novel, 1984, wrote: “By ‘patriotism’ I mean devotion to a particular place and a particular way of life, which one believes to be the best in the world but has no wish to force on other people. Patriotism is of its nature defensive, both militarily and culturally. Nationalism, on the other hand, is inseparable from the desire for power. The abiding purpose of every nationalist is to secure more power and more prestige, not for himself but for the nation or other unit in which he has chosen to sink his own individuality.”

Patriotism depends on unity of purpose, people of quite different political or religious views who pledge allegiance to “one nation, with liberty and justice for all.” True patriots see their responsibility not only to their own needs but the community needs as well.

President George Washington in his farewell address warned us about party politics: “The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge natural to party dissension … is itself a frightful despotism … In governments purely elective, a spirit of party is not to be encouraged … a fire not to be quenched, it demands a uniform vigilance to prevent its bursting into a flame, lest, instead of warming, it should consume.”

Speaking at a Flight 93 memorial service September 11, President George W. Bush recalled the unity of purpose most felt after the tragedy but also issued this warning about the present time in our national history from those within our country with a “disdain for pluralism, in their disregard for human life, in their determination to defile national symbols…”

I think the words of President John F. Kennedy at his 1961 inauguration address might help heal our wounds and draw out our better angels: “Ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country”.

I believe we are at a (long past) point in our history when we need to think and act about what is best for our country, adherence to our constitutional norms, not sacrificing them to enhance our desires.
By columnist John C. Morgan...October 6, 2021 . br... (show quote)


Do Not confuse Patriots with those who were told by the courts to either enlist or go to jail. Those were just scumbags trying to take the easy way out, adding nothing to America 🇺🇸.
To stand on National Route 7, in Skuon.
Those were the boys/men that truly embodied the word. Eighteen who never spoke of what they did for the advancement
of human rights, for villagers that they only knew because of their suffering, and clearing the path for their freedom.
Been there and done that for only one reason. It was the right thing to do at that point in history. And a world apart, they still thank us for their better lives today.
Some people hide behind the word patriot, and some fight to preserve its meaning.



Reply
Oct 13, 2021 07:03:58   #
American Vet
 
Coos Bay Tom wrote:
Patriotism and devotion to our country is not exclusively a right leaning virtue ,


Absolutely. There are many democrats/independents who have been hood-winked by the leftists in power now and are patriotic. Unfortunately, they have let the democrat party slide way, way left.

Reply
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