One Political Plaza - Home of politics
Home Active Topics Newest Pictures Search Login Register
General Chit-Chat (non-political talk)
Surveyors And PG&E Linemen Facing Angrier And Angrier People
Oct 3, 2021 15:04:29   #
woodguru
 
I am getting a surveyor out to legally establish property boundaries between the cattle ranch behind me and my neighbor to the side that is part owner of that. It has a fence that was done in the 1800's, and it is falling apart like it's over a hundred years old.

But the main thing is that it is at least 10 feet on my side of my property...that's 900 feet times at least 10 feet. Twenty or thirty years ago the cattle rancher would have won because county courts favored old range fences that were established decades and even hundreds of years ago. Now courts will correctly rule in favor of the true boundaries as can be surveyed and marked. This concept of using true lines really ticks conservatives off that are fine with where they put the fences in the first place.

The surveyor I'm using is a really interesting guy in regards to his perspectives and incidents he has gone through doing property boundary work in adverse conditions.

We were laughing about how the angry guys who come at him in a rage, often carrying guns, seem to be angry about the fact that when correct property lines are established, they are the ones that are going to lose what they see as what has always been their land as established by fences that are wrong. Half the time they can identify corner monuments, and it is obvious where a fence should be by simply looking from one corner to the next...but the prefer to go by what is wrong if it's in their favor. Flip that, and a fence gives them some of their neighbors land and they are all for that, in fact if that is the case they are probably the ones initiating the dispute and survey work.

Here is the difference between someone like myself and a conservative, my neighbors have their panties in a bunch about me establishing proper boundaries and putting up new fences. My attitude is that if the error is on the neighbors side and I "lose" a few feet of property I don't care, I just want it in the right spot as long as I'm paying for new fence, the true and correct spot being where it should be regardless. I don't even see why anyone would have a problem with accepting what is correct.

Across the cattle ranch out back, it is 900 feet of dilapidated 1800's range fence, falling over, propped up, antique barbed wire bolstered by newer layers. He commercially leases out range to guys that run a hundred cows or so, and I can't understand why he isn't willing to invest a few thousand dollars in good fence.

So now my quandary is whether I communicate what I'm doing and have it settled before I put in fence where the surveyor says it goes, which is my preference...or do I let them know where it is going and incur the expected confrontation.

I made them an offer to pay for half the fence installed by a professional that is leasing the 250 acres and keep it where it's at and they refused that offer. I told them if I am paying for the fence it is going exactly where it belongs and we know where that is. The next door neighbor made some comments about using a bulldozer, that being what they are for and he's done it before...I just said yeah right, whatever.

Reply
Oct 3, 2021 15:19:20   #
Kevyn
 
woodguru wrote:
I am getting a surveyor out to legally establish property boundaries between the cattle ranch behind me and my neighbor to the side that is part owner of that. It has a fence that was done in the 1800's, and it is falling apart like it's over a hundred years old.

But the main thing is that it is at least 10 feet on my side of my property...that's 900 feet times at least 10 feet. Twenty or thirty years ago the cattle rancher would have won because county courts favored old range fences that were established decades and even hundreds of years ago. Now courts will correctly rule in favor of the true boundaries as can be surveyed and marked. This concept of using true lines really ticks conservatives off that are fine with where they put the fences in the first place.

The surveyor I'm using is a really interesting guy in regards to his perspectives and incidents he has gone through doing property boundary work in adverse conditions.

We were laughing about how the angry guys who come at him in a rage, often carrying guns, seem to be angry about the fact that when correct property lines are established, they are the ones that are going to lose what they see as what has always been their land as established by fences that are wrong. Half the time they can identify corner monuments, and it is obvious where a fence should be by simply looking from one corner to the next...but the prefer to go by what is wrong if it's in their favor. Flip that, and a fence gives them some of their neighbors land and they are all for that, in fact if that is the case they are probably the ones initiating the dispute and survey work.

Here is the difference between someone like myself and a conservative, my neighbors have their panties in a bunch about me establishing proper boundaries and putting up new fences. My attitude is that if the error is on the neighbors side and I "lose" a few feet of property I don't care, I just want it in the right spot as long as I'm paying for new fence, the true and correct spot being where it should be regardless. I don't even see why anyone would have a problem with accepting what is correct.

Across the cattle ranch out back, it is 900 feet of dilapidated 1800's range fence, falling over, propped up, antique barbed wire bolstered by newer layers. He commercially leases out range to guys that run a hundred cows or so, and I can't understand why he isn't willing to invest a few thousand dollars in good fence.

So now my quandary is whether I communicate what I'm doing and have it settled before I put in fence where the surveyor says it goes, which is my preference...or do I let them know where it is going and incur the expected confrontation.

I made them an offer to pay for half the fence installed by a professional that is leasing the 250 acres and keep it where it's at and they refused that offer. I told them if I am paying for the fence it is going exactly where it belongs and we know where that is. The next door neighbor made some comments about using a bulldozer, that being what they are for and he's done it before...I just said yeah right, whatever.
I am getting a surveyor out to legally establish p... (show quote)

A quart of corn syrup makes a fine fuel additive for the neighbors dozer.

Reply
Oct 3, 2021 15:25:10   #
American Vet
 
Kevyn wrote:
A quart of corn syrup makes a fine fuel additive for the neighbors dozer.


And that's how a leftist thinks - criminally attack the other person.

Reply
 
 
Oct 3, 2021 15:40:05   #
MeddlesomeMom
 
woodguru wrote:
I am getting a surveyor out to legally establish property boundaries between the cattle ranch behind me and my neighbor to the side that is part owner of that. It has a fence that was done in the 1800's, and it is falling apart like it's over a hundred years old.

But the main thing is that it is at least 10 feet on my side of my property...that's 900 feet times at least 10 feet. Twenty or thirty years ago the cattle rancher would have won because county courts favored old range fences that were established decades and even hundreds of years ago. Now courts will correctly rule in favor of the true boundaries as can be surveyed and marked. This concept of using true lines really ticks conservatives off that are fine with where they put the fences in the first place.

The surveyor I'm using is a really interesting guy in regards to his perspectives and incidents he has gone through doing property boundary work in adverse conditions.

We were laughing about how the angry guys who come at him in a rage, often carrying guns, seem to be angry about the fact that when correct property lines are established, they are the ones that are going to lose what they see as what has always been their land as established by fences that are wrong. Half the time they can identify corner monuments, and it is obvious where a fence should be by simply looking from one corner to the next...but the prefer to go by what is wrong if it's in their favor. Flip that, and a fence gives them some of their neighbors land and they are all for that, in fact if that is the case they are probably the ones initiating the dispute and survey work.

Here is the difference between someone like myself and a conservative, my neighbors have their panties in a bunch about me establishing proper boundaries and putting up new fences. My attitude is that if the error is on the neighbors side and I "lose" a few feet of property I don't care, I just want it in the right spot as long as I'm paying for new fence, the true and correct spot being where it should be regardless. I don't even see why anyone would have a problem with accepting what is correct.

Across the cattle ranch out back, it is 900 feet of dilapidated 1800's range fence, falling over, propped up, antique barbed wire bolstered by newer layers. He commercially leases out range to guys that run a hundred cows or so, and I can't understand why he isn't willing to invest a few thousand dollars in good fence.

So now my quandary is whether I communicate what I'm doing and have it settled before I put in fence where the surveyor says it goes, which is my preference...or do I let them know where it is going and incur the expected confrontation.

I made them an offer to pay for half the fence installed by a professional that is leasing the 250 acres and keep it where it's at and they refused that offer. I told them if I am paying for the fence it is going exactly where it belongs and we know where that is. The next door neighbor made some comments about using a bulldozer, that being what they are for and he's done it before...I just said yeah right, whatever.
I am getting a surveyor out to legally establish p... (show quote)


Did you read the article about the Belgian farmer who moved a stone in his field and changed the border of France and Belgium? https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-56978344.amp

Exact boundary and survey lines matter. Do what is legal always. We have a ranch in west Texas that has been in our family for almost two hundred years and at one point my grandfather was sweet on the neighboring ranchers wife. They had been friends since grade school. Over the years he let them slightly move the fence line while plowing their fields. When we leased that land we had it surveyed and the fence moved to the surprise of the descendants of that rancher and his wife. The moral of both stories is always do what legal and property lines matter.

Reply
Oct 3, 2021 17:08:37   #
archie bunker Loc: Texas
 
woodguru wrote:
I am getting a surveyor out to legally establish property boundaries between the cattle ranch behind me and my neighbor to the side that is part owner of that. It has a fence that was done in the 1800's, and it is falling apart like it's over a hundred years old.

But the main thing is that it is at least 10 feet on my side of my property...that's 900 feet times at least 10 feet. Twenty or thirty years ago the cattle rancher would have won because county courts favored old range fences that were established decades and even hundreds of years ago. Now courts will correctly rule in favor of the true boundaries as can be surveyed and marked. This concept of using true lines really ticks conservatives off that are fine with where they put the fences in the first place.

The surveyor I'm using is a really interesting guy in regards to his perspectives and incidents he has gone through doing property boundary work in adverse conditions.

We were laughing about how the angry guys who come at him in a rage, often carrying guns, seem to be angry about the fact that when correct property lines are established, they are the ones that are going to lose what they see as what has always been their land as established by fences that are wrong. Half the time they can identify corner monuments, and it is obvious where a fence should be by simply looking from one corner to the next...but the prefer to go by what is wrong if it's in their favor. Flip that, and a fence gives them some of their neighbors land and they are all for that, in fact if that is the case they are probably the ones initiating the dispute and survey work.

Here is the difference between someone like myself and a conservative, my neighbors have their panties in a bunch about me establishing proper boundaries and putting up new fences. My attitude is that if the error is on the neighbors side and I "lose" a few feet of property I don't care, I just want it in the right spot as long as I'm paying for new fence, the true and correct spot being where it should be regardless. I don't even see why anyone would have a problem with accepting what is correct.

Across the cattle ranch out back, it is 900 feet of dilapidated 1800's range fence, falling over, propped up, antique barbed wire bolstered by newer layers. He commercially leases out range to guys that run a hundred cows or so, and I can't understand why he isn't willing to invest a few thousand dollars in good fence.

So now my quandary is whether I communicate what I'm doing and have it settled before I put in fence where the surveyor says it goes, which is my preference...or do I let them know where it is going and incur the expected confrontation.

I made them an offer to pay for half the fence installed by a professional that is leasing the 250 acres and keep it where it's at and they refused that offer. I told them if I am paying for the fence it is going exactly where it belongs and we know where that is. The next door neighbor made some comments about using a bulldozer, that being what they are for and he's done it before...I just said yeah right, whatever.
I am getting a surveyor out to legally establish p... (show quote)


Someone like yourself, and a conservative.......well, ain't that special? Ain't you just perfect?
I had a similar issue in 1997 with my property. I'd been here 3 years, was going through a nasty divorce when a pissed off guy beat on my door one day. He said he owned the property behind me, and I'd fenced off a half acre of his property. The fence was here when I bought it, so I took it for what it was.
Leaving out the language used in that conversation, he finally hired a surveyor, and it turns out my fence is three feet short of my actual boundary. The guy came, and apologized to me, and gave me "permission" to move my fence to where the survey markers were. I went, and drove posts on both corners, and a few in between using a single strand of wire as a tightline for accuracy, then banged on his door and told him if I caught him inside that wire I'd shoot him. He's dead now, not because of me, but now we're trying to find who the land went to so we can maybe buy it.

Just get your survey done, build your fence, and quit the politics over simple stuff, Mr. Perfect!

Reply
Oct 3, 2021 21:10:40   #
Kevyn
 
American Vet wrote:
And that's how a leftist thinks - criminally attack the other person.


The guy threatened to attack him, the suggestion is defensive.

Reply
Oct 3, 2021 21:31:59   #
archie bunker Loc: Texas
 
Kevyn wrote:
The guy threatened to attack him, the suggestion is defensive.


The guy allegedly threatened him. He is a known tall tale teller here. A drama queen, if you will.....

Reply
 
 
Oct 3, 2021 22:29:45   #
American Vet
 
Kevyn wrote:
The guy threatened to attack him, the suggestion is defensive.


A defensive action by sabotaging/vandalizing his equipment....ROTFLMAO

That's stupid - even for you......well, maybe not for you.

Reply
Oct 4, 2021 06:01:07   #
America 1
 
American Vet wrote:
A defensive action by sabotaging/vandalizing his equipment...ROTFLMAO

That's stupid - even for you......well, maybe not for you.


More stupidity,
A lady in Palm Beach Florida had a lawyer move in next door, demanded she move a small fence the encroached on his property by 6 inches.
This lady at that time was the largest shareholder of Sony stock.
Moving the fence did not stop his constant complaints.

Reply
Oct 4, 2021 09:23:50   #
Wonttakeitanymore
 
woodguru wrote:
I am getting a surveyor out to legally establish property boundaries between the cattle ranch behind me and my neighbor to the side that is part owner of that. It has a fence that was done in the 1800's, and it is falling apart like it's over a hundred years old.

But the main thing is that it is at least 10 feet on my side of my property...that's 900 feet times at least 10 feet. Twenty or thirty years ago the cattle rancher would have won because county courts favored old range fences that were established decades and even hundreds of years ago. Now courts will correctly rule in favor of the true boundaries as can be surveyed and marked. This concept of using true lines really ticks conservatives off that are fine with where they put the fences in the first place.

The surveyor I'm using is a really interesting guy in regards to his perspectives and incidents he has gone through doing property boundary work in adverse conditions.

We were laughing about how the angry guys who come at him in a rage, often carrying guns, seem to be angry about the fact that when correct property lines are established, they are the ones that are going to lose what they see as what has always been their land as established by fences that are wrong. Half the time they can identify corner monuments, and it is obvious where a fence should be by simply looking from one corner to the next...but the prefer to go by what is wrong if it's in their favor. Flip that, and a fence gives them some of their neighbors land and they are all for that, in fact if that is the case they are probably the ones initiating the dispute and survey work.

Here is the difference between someone like myself and a conservative, my neighbors have their panties in a bunch about me establishing proper boundaries and putting up new fences. My attitude is that if the error is on the neighbors side and I "lose" a few feet of property I don't care, I just want it in the right spot as long as I'm paying for new fence, the true and correct spot being where it should be regardless. I don't even see why anyone would have a problem with accepting what is correct.

Across the cattle ranch out back, it is 900 feet of dilapidated 1800's range fence, falling over, propped up, antique barbed wire bolstered by newer layers. He commercially leases out range to guys that run a hundred cows or so, and I can't understand why he isn't willing to invest a few thousand dollars in good fence.

So now my quandary is whether I communicate what I'm doing and have it settled before I put in fence where the surveyor says it goes, which is my preference...or do I let them know where it is going and incur the expected confrontation.

I made them an offer to pay for half the fence installed by a professional that is leasing the 250 acres and keep it where it's at and they refused that offer. I told them if I am paying for the fence it is going exactly where it belongs and we know where that is. The next door neighbor made some comments about using a bulldozer, that being what they are for and he's done it before...I just said yeah right, whatever.
I am getting a surveyor out to legally establish p... (show quote)

I believe if something stands , property line for a certain amount of time it becomes legally part of that property!

Reply
Oct 4, 2021 09:25:19   #
American Vet
 
Wonttakeitanymore wrote:
I believe if something stands , property line for a certain amount of time it becomes legally part of that property!


I think that varies from state to state - but it is true in some places.

Reply
 
 
Oct 4, 2021 13:19:32   #
Peewee Loc: San Antonio, TX
 
woodguru wrote:
I am getting a surveyor out to legally establish property boundaries between the cattle ranch behind me and my neighbor to the side that is part owner of that. It has a fence that was done in the 1800's, and it is falling apart like it's over a hundred years old.

But the main thing is that it is at least 10 feet on my side of my property...that's 900 feet times at least 10 feet. Twenty or thirty years ago the cattle rancher would have won because county courts favored old range fences that were established decades and even hundreds of years ago. Now courts will correctly rule in favor of the true boundaries as can be surveyed and marked. This concept of using true lines really ticks conservatives off that are fine with where they put the fences in the first place.

The surveyor I'm using is a really interesting guy in regards to his perspectives and incidents he has gone through doing property boundary work in adverse conditions.

We were laughing about how the angry guys who come at him in a rage, often carrying guns, seem to be angry about the fact that when correct property lines are established, they are the ones that are going to lose what they see as what has always been their land as established by fences that are wrong. Half the time they can identify corner monuments, and it is obvious where a fence should be by simply looking from one corner to the next...but the prefer to go by what is wrong if it's in their favor. Flip that, and a fence gives them some of their neighbors land and they are all for that, in fact if that is the case they are probably the ones initiating the dispute and survey work.

Here is the difference between someone like myself and a conservative, my neighbors have their panties in a bunch about me establishing proper boundaries and putting up new fences. My attitude is that if the error is on the neighbors side and I "lose" a few feet of property I don't care, I just want it in the right spot as long as I'm paying for new fence, the true and correct spot being where it should be regardless. I don't even see why anyone would have a problem with accepting what is correct.

Across the cattle ranch out back, it is 900 feet of dilapidated 1800's range fence, falling over, propped up, antique barbed wire bolstered by newer layers. He commercially leases out range to guys that run a hundred cows or so, and I can't understand why he isn't willing to invest a few thousand dollars in good fence.

So now my quandary is whether I communicate what I'm doing and have it settled before I put in fence where the surveyor says it goes, which is my preference...or do I let them know where it is going and incur the expected confrontation.

I made them an offer to pay for half the fence installed by a professional that is leasing the 250 acres and keep it where it's at and they refused that offer. I told them if I am paying for the fence it is going exactly where it belongs and we know where that is. The next door neighbor made some comments about using a bulldozer, that being what they are for and he's done it before...I just said yeah right, whatever.
I am getting a surveyor out to legally establish p... (show quote)


Rebuild the fence along the original property line. Don't ask, just do it. If no one complains it becomes your land again in a certain number of years. It happened to my family once. Do your research first. Just make it a simple inexpensive fence, in case you have to move it back. Different states have different rules. Don't take any additional land. Good luck.

Reply
Oct 4, 2021 13:20:44   #
Peewee Loc: San Antonio, TX
 
Kevyn wrote:
A quart of corn syrup makes a fine fuel additive for the neighbors dozer.


Sounds like something a union worker would do.

Reply
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
General Chit-Chat (non-political talk)
OnePoliticalPlaza.com - Forum
Copyright 2012-2021 IDF International Technologies, Inc.