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Sep 14, 2021 09:45:50   #
Canuckus Deploracus Loc: North of the wall
 
Sichuan Says Officials Must Drop Dialects at Work
Wang Lianzhang Sixth Tone

The government has long promoted the use of standardized Chinese, which currently 80% of Chinese people can speak.

After a secret investigation uncovered that many civil servants and party cadres converse in their local tongue during work hours instead of the standardized Chinese preferred by the government, the southwestern province Sichuan is banning the use of dialects in the office.

The provincial government announced the measure, which applies to state employees, during a press conference on Monday. It said about 10 percent of workers interviewed during the investigation could not speak Mandarin, the standardized language, even after being reminded to do so.

A notice released by the province’s language work committee says workers in party and government departments, as well as public institutions, will be required to achieve at least a score of 70%, or level 3-A, on the country’s Mandarin proficiency test within three years. They should lead the public by speaking Mandarin, it says, and added that banners and posters reminding people to speak standardized Chinese will be hung up throughout state buildings.

The Communist Party established Mandarin, derived from Chinese spoken in the area around Beijing, in 1955, so that the linguistically diverse country would have a unifying language. Commonly, China is said to have about 80 ethnic-minority languages and 10 groups of dialects spoken by the Han majority, though there are many more varieties. As of last year, four out of five Chinese people were able to speak Mandarin.

The force with which the government has pushed for the use of Mandarin has fluctuated throughout the years. Since 2004, overseas films may no longer be dubbed in dialects. A decade later, dialects were also barred from national TV.

In recent years, the Chinese government has become to be more tolerant of local Han dialects, seeing them as a form of Chinese culture’s “soft power.” However, the use of non-Mandarin languages in schools has remained a controversial issue.

Yan Xiuhong, a professor specializing in dialect conservation at Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, told Sixth Tone that Sichuanese people’s love for their dialects is a reflection of their strong cultural confidence. Many Han in the province are even unaware that what they speak isn’t Mandarin, Yan said.

Yan hopes that the new regulation will be implemented with restraint so as not to cause the use of dialects to die out. “Locals should speak Mandarin to people from other provinces for better communication, but they should still be able to speak dialects with each other to express their hometown feelings,” Yan said.

With rapid urbanization threatening local cultures, governments should pay more attention to preserving dialects and languages, Yan added. “If each region could have their own characteristic language, the culture will be more diversified to cultivate a more ideal society,” he says.

Reply
Sep 14, 2021 10:28:00   #
Kevyn
 
Canuckus Deploracus wrote:
Sichuan Says Officials Must Drop Dialects at Work
Wang Lianzhang Sixth Tone

The government has long promoted the use of standardized Chinese, which currently 80% of Chinese people can speak.

After a secret investigation uncovered that many civil servants and party cadres converse in their local tongue during work hours instead of the standardized Chinese preferred by the government, the southwestern province Sichuan is banning the use of dialects in the office.

The provincial government announced the measure, which applies to state employees, during a press conference on Monday. It said about 10 percent of workers interviewed during the investigation could not speak Mandarin, the standardized language, even after being reminded to do so.

A notice released by the province’s language work committee says workers in party and government departments, as well as public institutions, will be required to achieve at least a score of 70%, or level 3-A, on the country’s Mandarin proficiency test within three years. They should lead the public by speaking Mandarin, it says, and added that banners and posters reminding people to speak standardized Chinese will be hung up throughout state buildings.

The Communist Party established Mandarin, derived from Chinese spoken in the area around Beijing, in 1955, so that the linguistically diverse country would have a unifying language. Commonly, China is said to have about 80 ethnic-minority languages and 10 groups of dialects spoken by the Han majority, though there are many more varieties. As of last year, four out of five Chinese people were able to speak Mandarin.

The force with which the government has pushed for the use of Mandarin has fluctuated throughout the years. Since 2004, overseas films may no longer be dubbed in dialects. A decade later, dialects were also barred from national TV.

In recent years, the Chinese government has become to be more tolerant of local Han dialects, seeing them as a form of Chinese culture’s “soft power.” However, the use of non-Mandarin languages in schools has remained a controversial issue.

Yan Xiuhong, a professor specializing in dialect conservation at Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, told Sixth Tone that Sichuanese people’s love for their dialects is a reflection of their strong cultural confidence. Many Han in the province are even unaware that what they speak isn’t Mandarin, Yan said.

Yan hopes that the new regulation will be implemented with restraint so as not to cause the use of dialects to die out. “Locals should speak Mandarin to people from other provinces for better communication, but they should still be able to speak dialects with each other to express their hometown feelings,” Yan said.

With rapid urbanization threatening local cultures, governments should pay more attention to preserving dialects and languages, Yan added. “If each region could have their own characteristic language, the culture will be more diversified to cultivate a more ideal society,” he says.
Sichuan Says Officials Must Drop Dialects at Work ... (show quote)

The US has no official language you can speak and do business in the language of your choice. Obviously this is primarily English and Spanish but different languages are used in various parts of the country. Forcing an official language on people is reprehensible.

Reply
Sep 14, 2021 10:31:46   #
Roamin' Catholic Loc: the Frozen Tundra
 
Canuckus Deploracus wrote:
Sichuan Says Officials Must Drop Dialects at Work
Wang Lianzhang Sixth Tone

The government has long promoted the use of standardized Chinese, which currently 80% of Chinese people can speak.

After a secret investigation uncovered that many civil servants and party cadres converse in their local tongue during work hours instead of the standardized Chinese preferred by the government, the southwestern province Sichuan is banning the use of dialects in the office.

The provincial government announced the measure, which applies to state employees, during a press conference on Monday. It said about 10 percent of workers interviewed during the investigation could not speak Mandarin, the standardized language, even after being reminded to do so.

A notice released by the province’s language work committee says workers in party and government departments, as well as public institutions, will be required to achieve at least a score of 70%, or level 3-A, on the country’s Mandarin proficiency test within three years. They should lead the public by speaking Mandarin, it says, and added that banners and posters reminding people to speak standardized Chinese will be hung up throughout state buildings.

The Communist Party established Mandarin, derived from Chinese spoken in the area around Beijing, in 1955, so that the linguistically diverse country would have a unifying language. Commonly, China is said to have about 80 ethnic-minority languages and 10 groups of dialects spoken by the Han majority, though there are many more varieties. As of last year, four out of five Chinese people were able to speak Mandarin.

The force with which the government has pushed for the use of Mandarin has fluctuated throughout the years. Since 2004, overseas films may no longer be dubbed in dialects. A decade later, dialects were also barred from national TV.

In recent years, the Chinese government has become to be more tolerant of local Han dialects, seeing them as a form of Chinese culture’s “soft power.” However, the use of non-Mandarin languages in schools has remained a controversial issue.

Yan Xiuhong, a professor specializing in dialect conservation at Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, told Sixth Tone that Sichuanese people’s love for their dialects is a reflection of their strong cultural confidence. Many Han in the province are even unaware that what they speak isn’t Mandarin, Yan said.

Yan hopes that the new regulation will be implemented with restraint so as not to cause the use of dialects to die out. “Locals should speak Mandarin to people from other provinces for better communication, but they should still be able to speak dialects with each other to express their hometown feelings,” Yan said.

With rapid urbanization threatening local cultures, governments should pay more attention to preserving dialects and languages, Yan added. “If each region could have their own characteristic language, the culture will be more diversified to cultivate a more ideal society,” he says.
Sichuan Says Officials Must Drop Dialects at Work ... (show quote)


Do you speak Mandarin CD? Does your wife speak a dialect? 🎎

Reply
 
 
Sep 14, 2021 10:34:35   #
Canuckus Deploracus Loc: North of the wall
 
Kevyn wrote:
The US has no official language you can speak and do business in the language of your choice. Obviously this is primarily English and Spanish but different languages are used in various parts of the country. Forcing an official language on people is reprehensible.


Reprehensible???

Every other nation in the world does it

Reply
Sep 14, 2021 10:37:12   #
Canuckus Deploracus Loc: North of the wall
 
Roamin' Catholic wrote:
Do you speak Mandarin CD? Does your wife speak a dialect? 🎎


I speak Mandarin... As does my wife...

We both speak the northern dialect..But it is very similar to standard Mandarin...

I have a lot of trouble with some of the southern dialects..Sichuan is a good example.. It's far removed from standard ... Sort of like someone from Newfoundland speaking English😂😂😂

Reply
Sep 14, 2021 10:47:26   #
Kevyn
 
Canuckus Deploracus wrote:
Reprehensible???

Every other nation in the world does it


No they don’t. Switzerland has four official languages, Canada two more than that with First Nations languages, the U.K. several, New Zealand two, Belgium several. You must not get too far from home. Let me guess you listen to both kinds of music country and western.

Reply
Sep 14, 2021 11:15:22   #
keepuphope Loc: Idaho
 
Kevyn wrote:
The US has no official language you can speak and do business in the language of your choice. Obviously this is primarily English and Spanish but different languages are used in various parts of the country. Forcing an official language on people is reprehensible.


God forbid everyone speak and understand each other. There is a practical reason for this you know.So should everyone in the US use the many different languages we now have because of migration from all over the world. People move here for our laws and freedom.To assimilate means to choose this country's ideals. Not an affront to people moving here it's meant to include.

Reply
 
 
Sep 14, 2021 17:50:12   #
Roamin' Catholic Loc: the Frozen Tundra
 
Canuckus Deploracus wrote:
I speak Mandarin... As does my wife...

We both speak the northern dialect..But it is very similar to standard Mandarin...

I have a lot of trouble with some of the southern dialects..Sichuan is a good example.. It's far removed from standard ... Sort of like someone from Newfoundland speaking English😂😂😂


Newfindlind 😉

Reply
Sep 14, 2021 18:29:50   #
Canuckus Deploracus Loc: North of the wall
 
Kevyn wrote:
No they don’t. Switzerland has four official languages, Canada two more than that with First Nations languages, the U.K. several, New Zealand two, Belgium several. You must not get too far from home. Let me guess you listen to both kinds of music country and western.


Allow me to correct my statement...99% of nations do it...

Also, Canada and new Zealand are just throwing the natives a bone... Their languages aren't standard or taught throughout the nation...

I learned the Kootenay language as a teenager...

Reply
Sep 14, 2021 18:30:17   #
Canuckus Deploracus Loc: North of the wall
 
Roamin' Catholic wrote:
Newfindlind 😉


😂😂😂

Reply
Sep 14, 2021 20:13:52   #
archie bunker Loc: Texas
 
Canuckus Deploracus wrote:
Sichuan Says Officials Must Drop Dialects at Work
Wang Lianzhang Sixth Tone

The government has long promoted the use of standardized Chinese, which currently 80% of Chinese people can speak.

After a secret investigation uncovered that many civil servants and party cadres converse in their local tongue during work hours instead of the standardized Chinese preferred by the government, the southwestern province Sichuan is banning the use of dialects in the office.

The provincial government announced the measure, which applies to state employees, during a press conference on Monday. It said about 10 percent of workers interviewed during the investigation could not speak Mandarin, the standardized language, even after being reminded to do so.

A notice released by the province’s language work committee says workers in party and government departments, as well as public institutions, will be required to achieve at least a score of 70%, or level 3-A, on the country’s Mandarin proficiency test within three years. They should lead the public by speaking Mandarin, it says, and added that banners and posters reminding people to speak standardized Chinese will be hung up throughout state buildings.

The Communist Party established Mandarin, derived from Chinese spoken in the area around Beijing, in 1955, so that the linguistically diverse country would have a unifying language. Commonly, China is said to have about 80 ethnic-minority languages and 10 groups of dialects spoken by the Han majority, though there are many more varieties. As of last year, four out of five Chinese people were able to speak Mandarin.

The force with which the government has pushed for the use of Mandarin has fluctuated throughout the years. Since 2004, overseas films may no longer be dubbed in dialects. A decade later, dialects were also barred from national TV.

In recent years, the Chinese government has become to be more tolerant of local Han dialects, seeing them as a form of Chinese culture’s “soft power.” However, the use of non-Mandarin languages in schools has remained a controversial issue.

Yan Xiuhong, a professor specializing in dialect conservation at Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, told Sixth Tone that Sichuanese people’s love for their dialects is a reflection of their strong cultural confidence. Many Han in the province are even unaware that what they speak isn’t Mandarin, Yan said.

Yan hopes that the new regulation will be implemented with restraint so as not to cause the use of dialects to die out. “Locals should speak Mandarin to people from other provinces for better communication, but they should still be able to speak dialects with each other to express their hometown feelings,” Yan said.

With rapid urbanization threatening local cultures, governments should pay more attention to preserving dialects and languages, Yan added. “If each region could have their own characteristic language, the culture will be more diversified to cultivate a more ideal society,” he says.
Sichuan Says Officials Must Drop Dialects at Work ... (show quote)


Bad idea. Quick story. As you know, I'm a native Texan who has lived up in the Panhandle all my life speaking our language.
Years ago, when the kids were all little, a family from New Hampshire moved in down the road. Being good neighbors, we befriended them and tried to help them transition from city to country life.
We had a Herford bull calf out in the shed we were bottle feeding, and all the kids were playing with him, fed him a bottle and all that. This New Hampshire guy kept saying that a really nice heifer. I kept telling him that it was a bull calf till he finally spelled it out for me.

H EH F O AH D. in his dialect, the D was silent, so we had a bit of a problem communicating. We enjoyed them though.
He was an an accountant, and they moved to New Mexico where the language barrier is just as bad, or worse.
I'm a fan of different dialects myself.
There was a gal at the Arby's in Childress TX. who had the sweetest, smoky, sexy Texas accent, it was like listening to total erotica when ordering a Beef and Cheddar from her at the drive thru.

We don't have too many Icebacks here, but you ought to try talking to a Cajun sometime!!

Reply
 
 
Sep 14, 2021 20:20:49   #
Canuckus Deploracus Loc: North of the wall
 
archie bunker wrote:
Bad idea. Quick story. As you know, I'm a native Texan who has lived up in the Panhandle all my life speaking our language.
Years ago, when the kids were all little, a family from New Hampshire moved in down the road. Being good neighbors, we befriended them and tried to help them transition from city to country life.
We had a Herford bull calf out in the shed we were bottle feeding, and all the kids were playing with him, fed him a bottle and all that. This New Hampshire guy kept saying that a really nice heifer. I kept telling him that it was a bull calf till he finally spelled it out for me.

H EH F O AH D. in his dialect, the D was silent, so we had a bit of a problem communicating. We enjoyed them though.
He was an an accountant, and they moved to New Mexico where the language barrier is just as bad, or worse.
I'm a fan of different dialects myself.
There was a gal at the Arby's in Childress TX. who had the sweetest, smoky, sexy Texas accent, it was like listening to total erotica when ordering a Beef and Cheddar from her at the drive thru.

We don't have too many Icebacks here, but you ought to try talking to a Cajun sometime!!
Bad idea. Quick story. As you know, I'm a native ... (show quote)


I've met people from Louisiana... Teaching English over here🤮🤮🤮

I'm all for dialects as well... But not in government offices or anywhere official...

I remember getting off a plane in Atlanta, asked a woman who worked in the airport where the next terminal was... She told me three times before I asked her to write it down... Couldn't understand a thing she said, but she wrote well...

Reply
Sep 14, 2021 20:22:07   #
Cuda2020
 
Canuckus Deploracus wrote:
Sichuan Says Officials Must Drop Dialects at Work
Wang Lianzhang Sixth Tone

The government has long promoted the use of standardized Chinese, which currently 80% of Chinese people can speak.

After a secret investigation uncovered that many civil servants and party cadres converse in their local tongue during work hours instead of the standardized Chinese preferred by the government, the southwestern province Sichuan is banning the use of dialects in the office.

The provincial government announced the measure, which applies to state employees, during a press conference on Monday. It said about 10 percent of workers interviewed during the investigation could not speak Mandarin, the standardized language, even after being reminded to do so.

A notice released by the province’s language work committee says workers in party and government departments, as well as public institutions, will be required to achieve at least a score of 70%, or level 3-A, on the country’s Mandarin proficiency test within three years. They should lead the public by speaking Mandarin, it says, and added that banners and posters reminding people to speak standardized Chinese will be hung up throughout state buildings.

The Communist Party established Mandarin, derived from Chinese spoken in the area around Beijing, in 1955, so that the linguistically diverse country would have a unifying language. Commonly, China is said to have about 80 ethnic-minority languages and 10 groups of dialects spoken by the Han majority, though there are many more varieties. As of last year, four out of five Chinese people were able to speak Mandarin.

The force with which the government has pushed for the use of Mandarin has fluctuated throughout the years. Since 2004, overseas films may no longer be dubbed in dialects. A decade later, dialects were also barred from national TV.

In recent years, the Chinese government has become to be more tolerant of local Han dialects, seeing them as a form of Chinese culture’s “soft power.” However, the use of non-Mandarin languages in schools has remained a controversial issue.

Yan Xiuhong, a professor specializing in dialect conservation at Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, told Sixth Tone that Sichuanese people’s love for their dialects is a reflection of their strong cultural confidence. Many Han in the province are even unaware that what they speak isn’t Mandarin, Yan said.

Yan hopes that the new regulation will be implemented with restraint so as not to cause the use of dialects to die out. “Locals should speak Mandarin to people from other provinces for better communication, but they should still be able to speak dialects with each other to express their hometown feelings,” Yan said.

With rapid urbanization threatening local cultures, governments should pay more attention to preserving dialects and languages, Yan added. “If each region could have their own characteristic language, the culture will be more diversified to cultivate a more ideal society,” he says.
Sichuan Says Officials Must Drop Dialects at Work ... (show quote)


I think it’s time to choose a universal language, one that can be understood by all

Reply
Sep 14, 2021 20:30:50   #
Canuckus Deploracus Loc: North of the wall
 
Cuda2020 wrote:
I think it’s time to choose a universal language, one that can be understood by all


It's called "logic"...

Reply
Sep 14, 2021 21:04:03   #
keepuphope Loc: Idaho
 
Cuda2020 wrote:
I think it’s time to choose a universal language, one that can be understood by all


You can't be serious.That would stop the clicks that dems and liberals are pushing to separate us into groups.

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