One Political Plaza - Home of politics
Home Active Topics Newest Pictures Search Login Register
Main
White Americans feared they'd one day become victims of the monstrous capitalism they built
Page 1 of 2 next>
Apr 11, 2021 09:33:55   #
Milosia2 Loc: Cleveland Ohio
 
White Americans feared they'd one day become victims of the monstrous capitalism they built
Trump's sparsely-attended Tulsa rally exposes his greatest ...
www.alternet.org

Kaitlin Bird April 11, 2021

From the moment Donald Trump rose to political prominence, the pundit class stubbornly clung to "economic anxiety" as the explanation for why white voters can't quit him. No matter how often the idea was deconstructed, no matter how much evidence contradicted it, and no matter how ridiculous it became, the notion that poverty—not race—was the central force in lifting a bankrupt billionaire to the highest office in the land had a firm hold in the national political imagination.


As recently as January's insurrection, multiple commentators, columnists and social scientists expressed surprise at the wealth, resources and status afforded by these deeply "anxious" insurgents attacking the US Capitol, or felt compelled to further debunk the zombie lie that Trump voters have embraced bigotry in response to economic hardship. There's only one problem with this: economic anxiety is real.

Rather than extend healthcare, housing and food security to a Black and brown underclass, white Americans commodified basic needs into a catastrophe that has claimed almost 600,000 lives.

The mistake of "economic anxiety" as a concept was to substitute it for bigotry instead of understanding it is reflected and informed by bigotry. In a society built on white supremacy, everything relies on it, and our economy is no exception. We designed a country where white people progressed and profited explicitly at the cost of the lives and the land of Black and Indigenous people. Colonization, slavery, homesteading, redlining, mass European immigration: all wealth-building efforts adding to white coffers while commodifying Native resources and obliterating Black livelihoods.


There is no era of the nation's history in which white people built fortunes without racial subjugation, and white Americans are so aware of this, many can't imagine an economy without it. Simply, white voters didn't embrace bigotry because they faced economic precarity; they faced economic precarity because they embraced bigotry.


The Shining City on a Hill, the new world with streets are paved with gold, the land of opportunity and merit and promise—these are all the mythologies of white intergenerational wealth that elide the truth of a bounty built atop blood and bones.

In this national story, white people created and defined the wealth of the country, bolstered "widespread" prosperity and set a new standard of living for the world. The biggest economy and its fruits are exclusively "American," and "American" is defined by white wealth. To say anything else is an indictment of capitalism, especially the American version of it. Anything else reveals a lie of theft, abuse and exploitation. Anything else suggests that white people did not earn their primacy, but stole it.



And then Barack Obama got elected president in the middle of a profound financial panic. Change meant now a Black man would make decisions about how to rebuild the economy, where to allocate resources and what the costs of white supremacist capitalism had been—to best avoid them going forward. For the white elite, Obama's presidency was an indictment of their system. For the white middle class, it was an interrogation of their worthiness. For the white poor, it was an existential crisis.

Even though Obama's actual policy preferences were remarkably milquetoast and technocratic, his presence as the first Black man to be elected president was the embodiment of radicalism. This is why the white wealthy joked about "the affirmative action president" even as they systematically attacked through the judiciary the opportunities affirmative action affords. This is why the white middle class said they wanted "their country back" and disliked his public solidarity with Black people being attacked as an underclass, regardless of their actual personal wealth. This is why white low-income workers accepted "socialism" as a slur for his presence in the White House as the chief executive. If Obama represented the future of America—its hopes, possibilities, wealth—then whiteness now represented its shameful and broken past.



No matter what the manifestation the bigotry took, all of it was fueled by fear. Fear that wealthy white scions may not be as secure as their parents; fear that rising Black and Indigenous power inevitably results in a shrinking white middle class; fear that whiteness was no longer enough to maintain dignity in poverty and depression.


So it was no surprise that when someone spoke to the fear of a "great replacement"1 politically, culturally and economically, that white voters rushed to him for validation, and accepted whatever the costs might be (mostly paid by Black and brown people) to get the fleeting feeling of security in believing that nothing would really change.

White Americans have feared they would one day become victims of the monstrous capitalism they built, even as they enjoyed the security and safety of generations of exploitation, and it has given us untold suffering as a country. Rather than extend healthcare, housing and food security to a Black and brown underclass, they commodified basic needs into a catastrophe that's claimed almost 600,000 lives.

Quick to reopen an economy that has relied on the labor of disproportionately Black and brown workers, white Americans have been even quicker to deny access to citizenship or the rights therein to the very same people. They scramble, desperately, to hold on to a system and society already escaping their grasp, and yet this only drives them deeper into denial and violence. The loss of white primacy is a kind of vigilant anxiety, a painful acceptance of truth that many cannot bear to face, and they have found a political movement ready and willing to keep them oblivious.

Because it isn't only the economy at risk.

Reply
Apr 11, 2021 09:35:30   #
Milosia2 Loc: Cleveland Ohio
 
**The Shining City on a Hill, the new world with streets are paved with gold, the land of opportunity and merit and promise—these are all the mythologies of white intergenerational wealth that elide the truth of a bounty built atop blood and bones.**

Reply
Apr 11, 2021 09:52:00   #
amadjuster Loc: Texas Panhandle
 
Milosia2 wrote:
**The Shining City on a Hill, the new world with streets are paved with gold, the land of opportunity and merit and promise—these are all the mythologies of white intergenerational wealth that elide the truth of a bounty built atop blood and bones.**


I’ll bet you do First Amendment audits at battered women’s centers and children’s shelters.

Reply
 
 
Apr 11, 2021 09:54:57   #
Radiance3
 
Milosia2 wrote:
White Americans feared they'd one day become victims of the monstrous capitalism they built
Trump's sparsely-attended Tulsa rally exposes his greatest ...
www.alternet.org

Kaitlin Bird April 11, 2021

From the moment Donald Trump rose to political prominence, the pundit class stubbornly clung to "economic anxiety" as the explanation for why white voters can't quit him. No matter how often the idea was deconstructed, no matter how much evidence contradicted it, and no matter how ridiculous it became, the notion that poverty—not race—was the central force in lifting a bankrupt billionaire to the highest office in the land had a firm hold in the national political imagination.


As recently as January's insurrection, multiple commentators, columnists and social scientists expressed surprise at the wealth, resources and status afforded by these deeply "anxious" insurgents attacking the US Capitol, or felt compelled to further debunk the zombie lie that Trump voters have embraced bigotry in response to economic hardship. There's only one problem with this: economic anxiety is real.

Rather than extend healthcare, housing and food security to a Black and brown underclass, white Americans commodified basic needs into a catastrophe that has claimed almost 600,000 lives.

The mistake of "economic anxiety" as a concept was to substitute it for bigotry instead of understanding it is reflected and informed by bigotry. In a society built on white supremacy, everything relies on it, and our economy is no exception. We designed a country where white people progressed and profited explicitly at the cost of the lives and the land of Black and Indigenous people. Colonization, slavery, homesteading, redlining, mass European immigration: all wealth-building efforts adding to white coffers while commodifying Native resources and obliterating Black livelihoods.


There is no era of the nation's history in which white people built fortunes without racial subjugation, and white Americans are so aware of this, many can't imagine an economy without it. Simply, white voters didn't embrace bigotry because they faced economic precarity; they faced economic precarity because they embraced bigotry.


The Shining City on a Hill, the new world with streets are paved with gold, the land of opportunity and merit and promise—these are all the mythologies of white intergenerational wealth that elide the truth of a bounty built atop blood and bones.

In this national story, white people created and defined the wealth of the country, bolstered "widespread" prosperity and set a new standard of living for the world. The biggest economy and its fruits are exclusively "American," and "American" is defined by white wealth. To say anything else is an indictment of capitalism, especially the American version of it. Anything else reveals a lie of theft, abuse and exploitation. Anything else suggests that white people did not earn their primacy, but stole it.



And then Barack Obama got elected president in the middle of a profound financial panic. Change meant now a Black man would make decisions about how to rebuild the economy, where to allocate resources and what the costs of white supremacist capitalism had been—to best avoid them going forward. For the white elite, Obama's presidency was an indictment of their system. For the white middle class, it was an interrogation of their worthiness. For the white poor, it was an existential crisis.

Even though Obama's actual policy preferences were remarkably milquetoast and technocratic, his presence as the first Black man to be elected president was the embodiment of radicalism. This is why the white wealthy joked about "the affirmative action president" even as they systematically attacked through the judiciary the opportunities affirmative action affords. This is why the white middle class said they wanted "their country back" and disliked his public solidarity with Black people being attacked as an underclass, regardless of their actual personal wealth. This is why white low-income workers accepted "socialism" as a slur for his presence in the White House as the chief executive. If Obama represented the future of America—its hopes, possibilities, wealth—then whiteness now represented its shameful and broken past.



No matter what the manifestation the bigotry took, all of it was fueled by fear. Fear that wealthy white scions may not be as secure as their parents; fear that rising Black and Indigenous power inevitably results in a shrinking white middle class; fear that whiteness was no longer enough to maintain dignity in poverty and depression.


So it was no surprise that when someone spoke to the fear of a "great replacement"1 politically, culturally and economically, that white voters rushed to him for validation, and accepted whatever the costs might be (mostly paid by Black and brown people) to get the fleeting feeling of security in believing that nothing would really change.

White Americans have feared they would one day become victims of the monstrous capitalism they built, even as they enjoyed the security and safety of generations of exploitation, and it has given us untold suffering as a country. Rather than extend healthcare, housing and food security to a Black and brown underclass, they commodified basic needs into a catastrophe that's claimed almost 600,000 lives.

Quick to reopen an economy that has relied on the labor of disproportionately Black and brown workers, white Americans have been even quicker to deny access to citizenship or the rights therein to the very same people. They scramble, desperately, to hold on to a system and society already escaping their grasp, and yet this only drives them deeper into denial and violence. The loss of white primacy is a kind of vigilant anxiety, a painful acceptance of truth that many cannot bear to face, and they have found a political movement ready and willing to keep them oblivious.

Because it isn't only the economy at risk.
White Americans feared they'd one day become victi... (show quote)

=============
That's the idea of morons. That's happening now under the Biden/Kamala the ho, administration.

For 245 years since the independence of America, that gave the citizens the freedom to think, work, innovate, create, manufacture great things without limits. That's how America became the greatest, most powerful, and richest country in the world.

Until millions of thugs populate to depend and handout, cause they have no brains, but do and manufacture drugs, commit crimes, complain of racial discrimination due to the color of their skin. Now, they also complain that math is racist.

Freedom and capitalism came from God, who gave us unlimited potentials and wisdom to use, in quest for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. This is where America came from.

Presently, millions of violent and dumb people are multiplying to take over. Their weapon is "race".

Reply
Apr 11, 2021 10:08:19   #
son of witless
 
Milosia2 wrote:
White Americans feared they'd one day become victims of the monstrous capitalism they built
Trump's sparsely-attended Tulsa rally exposes his greatest ...
www.alternet.org

Kaitlin Bird April 11, 2021

From the moment Donald Trump rose to political prominence, the pundit class stubbornly clung to "economic anxiety" as the explanation for why white voters can't quit him. No matter how often the idea was deconstructed, no matter how much evidence contradicted it, and no matter how ridiculous it became, the notion that poverty—not race—was the central force in lifting a bankrupt billionaire to the highest office in the land had a firm hold in the national political imagination.


As recently as January's insurrection, multiple commentators, columnists and social scientists expressed surprise at the wealth, resources and status afforded by these deeply "anxious" insurgents attacking the US Capitol, or felt compelled to further debunk the zombie lie that Trump voters have embraced bigotry in response to economic hardship. There's only one problem with this: economic anxiety is real.

Rather than extend healthcare, housing and food security to a Black and brown underclass, white Americans commodified basic needs into a catastrophe that has claimed almost 600,000 lives.

The mistake of "economic anxiety" as a concept was to substitute it for bigotry instead of understanding it is reflected and informed by bigotry. In a society built on white supremacy, everything relies on it, and our economy is no exception. We designed a country where white people progressed and profited explicitly at the cost of the lives and the land of Black and Indigenous people. Colonization, slavery, homesteading, redlining, mass European immigration: all wealth-building efforts adding to white coffers while commodifying Native resources and obliterating Black livelihoods.


There is no era of the nation's history in which white people built fortunes without racial subjugation, and white Americans are so aware of this, many can't imagine an economy without it. Simply, white voters didn't embrace bigotry because they faced economic precarity; they faced economic precarity because they embraced bigotry.


The Shining City on a Hill, the new world with streets are paved with gold, the land of opportunity and merit and promise—these are all the mythologies of white intergenerational wealth that elide the truth of a bounty built atop blood and bones.

In this national story, white people created and defined the wealth of the country, bolstered "widespread" prosperity and set a new standard of living for the world. The biggest economy and its fruits are exclusively "American," and "American" is defined by white wealth. To say anything else is an indictment of capitalism, especially the American version of it. Anything else reveals a lie of theft, abuse and exploitation. Anything else suggests that white people did not earn their primacy, but stole it.



And then Barack Obama got elected president in the middle of a profound financial panic. Change meant now a Black man would make decisions about how to rebuild the economy, where to allocate resources and what the costs of white supremacist capitalism had been—to best avoid them going forward. For the white elite, Obama's presidency was an indictment of their system. For the white middle class, it was an interrogation of their worthiness. For the white poor, it was an existential crisis.

Even though Obama's actual policy preferences were remarkably milquetoast and technocratic, his presence as the first Black man to be elected president was the embodiment of radicalism. This is why the white wealthy joked about "the affirmative action president" even as they systematically attacked through the judiciary the opportunities affirmative action affords. This is why the white middle class said they wanted "their country back" and disliked his public solidarity with Black people being attacked as an underclass, regardless of their actual personal wealth. This is why white low-income workers accepted "socialism" as a slur for his presence in the White House as the chief executive. If Obama represented the future of America—its hopes, possibilities, wealth—then whiteness now represented its shameful and broken past.



No matter what the manifestation the bigotry took, all of it was fueled by fear. Fear that wealthy white scions may not be as secure as their parents; fear that rising Black and Indigenous power inevitably results in a shrinking white middle class; fear that whiteness was no longer enough to maintain dignity in poverty and depression.


So it was no surprise that when someone spoke to the fear of a "great replacement"1 politically, culturally and economically, that white voters rushed to him for validation, and accepted whatever the costs might be (mostly paid by Black and brown people) to get the fleeting feeling of security in believing that nothing would really change.

White Americans have feared they would one day become victims of the monstrous capitalism they built, even as they enjoyed the security and safety of generations of exploitation, and it has given us untold suffering as a country. Rather than extend healthcare, housing and food security to a Black and brown underclass, they commodified basic needs into a catastrophe that's claimed almost 600,000 lives.

Quick to reopen an economy that has relied on the labor of disproportionately Black and brown workers, white Americans have been even quicker to deny access to citizenship or the rights therein to the very same people. They scramble, desperately, to hold on to a system and society already escaping their grasp, and yet this only drives them deeper into denial and violence. The loss of white primacy is a kind of vigilant anxiety, a painful acceptance of truth that many cannot bear to face, and they have found a political movement ready and willing to keep them oblivious.

Because it isn't only the economy at risk.
White Americans feared they'd one day become victi... (show quote)


"
Even though Obama's actual policy preferences were remarkably milquetoast and technocratic, "

That is an amazingly inaccurate statement.

Reply
Apr 11, 2021 10:52:37   #
microphor
 
Milosia2 wrote:
White Americans feared they'd one day become victims of the monstrous capitalism they built
Trump's sparsely-attended Tulsa rally exposes his greatest ...
www.alternet.org

Kaitlin Bird April 11, 2021

From the moment Donald Trump rose to political prominence, the pundit class stubbornly clung to "economic anxiety" as the explanation for why white voters can't quit him. No matter how often the idea was deconstructed, no matter how much evidence contradicted it, and no matter how ridiculous it became, the notion that poverty—not race—was the central force in lifting a bankrupt billionaire to the highest office in the land had a firm hold in the national political imagination.


As recently as January's insurrection, multiple commentators, columnists and social scientists expressed surprise at the wealth, resources and status afforded by these deeply "anxious" insurgents attacking the US Capitol, or felt compelled to further debunk the zombie lie that Trump voters have embraced bigotry in response to economic hardship. There's only one problem with this: economic anxiety is real.

Rather than extend healthcare, housing and food security to a Black and brown underclass, white Americans commodified basic needs into a catastrophe that has claimed almost 600,000 lives.

The mistake of "economic anxiety" as a concept was to substitute it for bigotry instead of understanding it is reflected and informed by bigotry. In a society built on white supremacy, everything relies on it, and our economy is no exception. We designed a country where white people progressed and profited explicitly at the cost of the lives and the land of Black and Indigenous people. Colonization, slavery, homesteading, redlining, mass European immigration: all wealth-building efforts adding to white coffers while commodifying Native resources and obliterating Black livelihoods.


There is no era of the nation's history in which white people built fortunes without racial subjugation, and white Americans are so aware of this, many can't imagine an economy without it. Simply, white voters didn't embrace bigotry because they faced economic precarity; they faced economic precarity because they embraced bigotry.


The Shining City on a Hill, the new world with streets are paved with gold, the land of opportunity and merit and promise—these are all the mythologies of white intergenerational wealth that elide the truth of a bounty built atop blood and bones.

In this national story, white people created and defined the wealth of the country, bolstered "widespread" prosperity and set a new standard of living for the world. The biggest economy and its fruits are exclusively "American," and "American" is defined by white wealth. To say anything else is an indictment of capitalism, especially the American version of it. Anything else reveals a lie of theft, abuse and exploitation. Anything else suggests that white people did not earn their primacy, but stole it.



And then Barack Obama got elected president in the middle of a profound financial panic. Change meant now a Black man would make decisions about how to rebuild the economy, where to allocate resources and what the costs of white supremacist capitalism had been—to best avoid them going forward. For the white elite, Obama's presidency was an indictment of their system. For the white middle class, it was an interrogation of their worthiness. For the white poor, it was an existential crisis.

Even though Obama's actual policy preferences were remarkably milquetoast and technocratic, his presence as the first Black man to be elected president was the embodiment of radicalism. This is why the white wealthy joked about "the affirmative action president" even as they systematically attacked through the judiciary the opportunities affirmative action affords. This is why the white middle class said they wanted "their country back" and disliked his public solidarity with Black people being attacked as an underclass, regardless of their actual personal wealth. This is why white low-income workers accepted "socialism" as a slur for his presence in the White House as the chief executive. If Obama represented the future of America—its hopes, possibilities, wealth—then whiteness now represented its shameful and broken past.



No matter what the manifestation the bigotry took, all of it was fueled by fear. Fear that wealthy white scions may not be as secure as their parents; fear that rising Black and Indigenous power inevitably results in a shrinking white middle class; fear that whiteness was no longer enough to maintain dignity in poverty and depression.


So it was no surprise that when someone spoke to the fear of a "great replacement"1 politically, culturally and economically, that white voters rushed to him for validation, and accepted whatever the costs might be (mostly paid by Black and brown people) to get the fleeting feeling of security in believing that nothing would really change.

White Americans have feared they would one day become victims of the monstrous capitalism they built, even as they enjoyed the security and safety of generations of exploitation, and it has given us untold suffering as a country. Rather than extend healthcare, housing and food security to a Black and brown underclass, they commodified basic needs into a catastrophe that's claimed almost 600,000 lives.

Quick to reopen an economy that has relied on the labor of disproportionately Black and brown workers, white Americans have been even quicker to deny access to citizenship or the rights therein to the very same people. They scramble, desperately, to hold on to a system and society already escaping their grasp, and yet this only drives them deeper into denial and violence. The loss of white primacy is a kind of vigilant anxiety, a painful acceptance of truth that many cannot bear to face, and they have found a political movement ready and willing to keep them oblivious.

Because it isn't only the economy at risk.
White Americans feared they'd one day become victi... (show quote)

Still a mind reader I see. You know whats in everybody's head, why they think what they think, what color they must be, leaving out shit that doesnt fit your narrative.

Reply
Apr 11, 2021 12:20:29   #
Carol Kelly
 
Milosia2 wrote:
**The Shining City on a Hill, the new world with streets are paved with gold, the land of opportunity and merit and promise—these are all the mythologies of white intergenerational wealth that elide the truth of a bounty built atop blood and bones.**


I recall negroes singing about the streets paved with gold. You people just can’t get over Trump. He was really onto something, wasn’t he? And getting closer to shutting “IT” down. You are the most radical of the most radical. And ridiculously hateful. Why?

Reply
 
 
Apr 11, 2021 13:27:33   #
Wonttakeitanymore
 
Milosia2 wrote:
White Americans feared they'd one day become victims of the monstrous capitalism they built
Trump's sparsely-attended Tulsa rally exposes his greatest ...
www.alternet.org

Kaitlin Bird April 11, 2021

From the moment Donald Trump rose to political prominence, the pundit class stubbornly clung to "economic anxiety" as the explanation for why white voters can't quit him. No matter how often the idea was deconstructed, no matter how much evidence contradicted it, and no matter how ridiculous it became, the notion that poverty—not race—was the central force in lifting a bankrupt billionaire to the highest office in the land had a firm hold in the national political imagination.


As recently as January's insurrection, multiple commentators, columnists and social scientists expressed surprise at the wealth, resources and status afforded by these deeply "anxious" insurgents attacking the US Capitol, or felt compelled to further debunk the zombie lie that Trump voters have embraced bigotry in response to economic hardship. There's only one problem with this: economic anxiety is real.

Rather than extend healthcare, housing and food security to a Black and brown underclass, white Americans commodified basic needs into a catastrophe that has claimed almost 600,000 lives.

The mistake of "economic anxiety" as a concept was to substitute it for bigotry instead of understanding it is reflected and informed by bigotry. In a society built on white supremacy, everything relies on it, and our economy is no exception. We designed a country where white people progressed and profited explicitly at the cost of the lives and the land of Black and Indigenous people. Colonization, slavery, homesteading, redlining, mass European immigration: all wealth-building efforts adding to white coffers while commodifying Native resources and obliterating Black livelihoods.


There is no era of the nation's history in which white people built fortunes without racial subjugation, and white Americans are so aware of this, many can't imagine an economy without it. Simply, white voters didn't embrace bigotry because they faced economic precarity; they faced economic precarity because they embraced bigotry.


The Shining City on a Hill, the new world with streets are paved with gold, the land of opportunity and merit and promise—these are all the mythologies of white intergenerational wealth that elide the truth of a bounty built atop blood and bones.

In this national story, white people created and defined the wealth of the country, bolstered "widespread" prosperity and set a new standard of living for the world. The biggest economy and its fruits are exclusively "American," and "American" is defined by white wealth. To say anything else is an indictment of capitalism, especially the American version of it. Anything else reveals a lie of theft, abuse and exploitation. Anything else suggests that white people did not earn their primacy, but stole it.



And then Barack Obama got elected president in the middle of a profound financial panic. Change meant now a Black man would make decisions about how to rebuild the economy, where to allocate resources and what the costs of white supremacist capitalism had been—to best avoid them going forward. For the white elite, Obama's presidency was an indictment of their system. For the white middle class, it was an interrogation of their worthiness. For the white poor, it was an existential crisis.

Even though Obama's actual policy preferences were remarkably milquetoast and technocratic, his presence as the first Black man to be elected president was the embodiment of radicalism. This is why the white wealthy joked about "the affirmative action president" even as they systematically attacked through the judiciary the opportunities affirmative action affords. This is why the white middle class said they wanted "their country back" and disliked his public solidarity with Black people being attacked as an underclass, regardless of their actual personal wealth. This is why white low-income workers accepted "socialism" as a slur for his presence in the White House as the chief executive. If Obama represented the future of America—its hopes, possibilities, wealth—then whiteness now represented its shameful and broken past.



No matter what the manifestation the bigotry took, all of it was fueled by fear. Fear that wealthy white scions may not be as secure as their parents; fear that rising Black and Indigenous power inevitably results in a shrinking white middle class; fear that whiteness was no longer enough to maintain dignity in poverty and depression.


So it was no surprise that when someone spoke to the fear of a "great replacement"1 politically, culturally and economically, that white voters rushed to him for validation, and accepted whatever the costs might be (mostly paid by Black and brown people) to get the fleeting feeling of security in believing that nothing would really change.

White Americans have feared they would one day become victims of the monstrous capitalism they built, even as they enjoyed the security and safety of generations of exploitation, and it has given us untold suffering as a country. Rather than extend healthcare, housing and food security to a Black and brown underclass, they commodified basic needs into a catastrophe that's claimed almost 600,000 lives.

Quick to reopen an economy that has relied on the labor of disproportionately Black and brown workers, white Americans have been even quicker to deny access to citizenship or the rights therein to the very same people. They scramble, desperately, to hold on to a system and society already escaping their grasp, and yet this only drives them deeper into denial and violence. The loss of white primacy is a kind of vigilant anxiety, a painful acceptance of truth that many cannot bear to face, and they have found a political movement ready and willing to keep them oblivious.

Because it isn't only the economy at risk.
White Americans feared they'd one day become victi... (show quote)

You people are the racists!

Reply
Apr 11, 2021 13:29:38   #
Wonttakeitanymore
 
Milosia2 wrote:
**The Shining City on a Hill, the new world with streets are paved with gold, the land of opportunity and merit and promise—these are all the mythologies of white intergenerational wealth that elide the truth of a bounty built atop blood and bones.**

Generational wealth by hard work and faith in God! People with standards! The golden streets are in the heaven we all believe in! This is just the precursor!

Reply
Apr 11, 2021 18:49:23   #
Milosia2 Loc: Cleveland Ohio
 
Radiance3 wrote:
=============
That's the idea of morons. That's happening now under the Biden/Kamala the ho, administration.

For 245 years since the independence of America, that gave the citizens the freedom to think, work, innovate, create, manufacture great things without limits. That's how America became the greatest, most powerful, and richest country in the world.

Until millions of thugs populate to depend and handout, cause they have no brains, but do and manufacture drugs, commit crimes, complain of racial discrimination due to the color of their skin. Now, they also complain that math is racist.

Freedom and capitalism came from God, who gave us unlimited potentials and wisdom to use, in quest for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. This is where America came from.

Presently, millions of violent and dumb people are multiplying to take over. Their weapon is "race".
============= br i That's the idea of morons. Th... (show quote)



** Freedom and capitalism came from God, who gave us unlimited potentials and wisdom to use, in quest for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.**
If this is true then where did
feed the poor
Love thy neighbor
Thou shalt not kill.
And all the others that don’t not mention
capitalism or Freedom.
Are you sure your source is correct ?

Reply
Apr 11, 2021 18:53:59   #
Milosia2 Loc: Cleveland Ohio
 
Wonttakeitanymore wrote:
Generational wealth by hard work and faith in God! People with standards! The golden streets are in the heaven we all believe in! This is just the precursor!


No one gets rich working for a living.
This simple reason.
The more money you make,
The less you work.
If you were a millionaire and are now a billionaire
How much harder did you need to work ?

Reply
 
 
Apr 11, 2021 18:58:08   #
Milosia2 Loc: Cleveland Ohio
 
Carol Kelly wrote:
I recall negroes singing about the streets paved with gold. You people just can’t get over Trump. He was really onto something, wasn’t he? And getting closer to shutting “IT” down. You are the most radical of the most radical. And ridiculously hateful. Why?


Trump ?
I didn’t mention trump, you did .
“The shining city on the hill” was from a Reagan speech before he gave the “ go ahead “ to steal all the wealth.

Reply
Apr 11, 2021 19:08:06   #
Radiance3
 
Milosia2 wrote:
** Freedom and capitalism came from God, who gave us unlimited potentials and wisdom to use, in quest for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.**
If this is true then where did
feed the poor
Love thy neighbor
Thou shalt not kill.
And all the others that don’t not mention
capitalism or Freedom.
Are you sure your source is correct ?

================
Who feed the poor but those who've work and earn? They're the people funding the federal government thru massive taxes impost on them. The government does not earn. It expends the money that rich people pay. That's what the government feed to the handouts, thugs, and mobs, and those complaining of racial injustices. The dumb complain of everything. That math is racist, and SAT is racist.

The thugs knock down those other ethnic groups who are smarter, perform well, and get ahead of them.

The rich pay the poor, by giving them jobs to earn for a living. Without the rich, the poor will starve.

The rich are the people who give jobs due to their business enterprises. Without the rich who'll employ the people? Without the rich, where will the government get money to fund its operations? Without the rich, where will the LIBS get money to corrupt? That is why they stay in their government posts for life. The source of their earnings is the government. Government takes the money from the people who are smart and work hard. That is the way of life. Now, handouts are multiplying so fast. Added by millions of illegals Biden has invited.

Handouts complain of almost everything. Their weapon is "race".

Biden and his team are rapidly in the process of taxing so high those who perform well. The purpose is to get more funding to distribute to the poor. Biden will continue raking the money from the rich to level the playing field. Therefore the government grows its power as the peoples' subside for better control to communism. Joe's role model is China. He'll unite the people by bringing them down.

Reply
Apr 11, 2021 19:18:04   #
Milosia2 Loc: Cleveland Ohio
 
microphor wrote:
Still a mind reader I see. You know whats in everybody's head, why they think what they think, what color they must be, leaving out shit that doesnt fit your narrative.


It cut and paste.
I rarely edit, but will stop at 15,000 words.
So, what am I leaving out ?
I am not capable of writing as astutely and elegantly as the things I post.
While I may not agree to a tee, I generally mostly agree.

Reply
Apr 11, 2021 19:25:27   #
Milosia2 Loc: Cleveland Ohio
 
Radiance3 wrote:
================
Who feed the poor but those who've worked and earned? They're the people funding the federal government thru massive taxes impost on them. The government does not earn. It expends our money that we pay to them. That's what the government feed to the handouts, thugs and mobs, complaining of racial injustices. Then they knock down those other ethnic groups who are smart and perform well.

The rich pay the poor, the dumb and those lazy to earn.
The rich are the people who give jobs due to their business enterprise. Without them who'll employ the people? Without them where will the government get money to operate? Without them where will the LIBS
================ br Who feed the poor but those wh... (show quote)


Where will we get the money ? I can remind you it is our money too. We elect people to congress that are to decide where the money will be spent.
It is printed to benefit every citizen , not only a select few. Stop buying the lies that the money only belongs to rich people and no one else deserves it.
Explain to me, what does American Birthright signify ?
To work for pennies a lifetime , die in poverty. With no freedoms, opportunities or Liberty.
What is an American Birthright and why do youz people keep giving it all away ?

Reply
Page 1 of 2 next>
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
Main
OnePoliticalPlaza.com - Forum
Copyright 2012-2021 IDF International Technologies, Inc.