One Political Plaza - Home of politics
Home Active Topics Newest Pictures Search Login Register
Faith, Religion, Spirituality
Is God a Place----A Divine Place
Apr 6, 2021 12:16:01   #
bahmer
 
The Hebrew Bible contains more than two dozen names for God which many of us have heard before: YHWH (“Lord”), Elohim (“God”), Sabaoth (“armies”). One of the more obscure names for God used by Jews is Ha-Makom. This literally means “the place.” What does this signify? Is God a place? How did this rather ordinary word become one of God’s holiest names?

What can we learn from Jacob’s Dream?
One of the most famous stories in the Book of Genesis, is Jacob’s dream where angels ascend and descend a ladder to heaven. It begins with these words, “He came to a certain place and stopped there for the night, for the sun had set” (Gen. 28:11). In Hebrew, “place” is makom (מקום). Where is this place? It is strange that the Torah, which is usually full of geographical details, does not specify the location. 
   
Place Transcending Space
According to an ancient Jewish interpretation of this verse, the makom which Jacob encountered is not a physical location, but God’s presence itself. The rabbis of the Talmud famously explained, “God is the place of the world, and the world is not His place.” In other words, God cannot be limited to one individual spot. Rather, God transcends space, and he is accessible to all people in all places. 

Discover the depths of the Bible
To this day, it is common to hear Jews refer to God as Ha-Makom (“the place”) in prayer. This name captures God’s eternal vastness, while emphasizing his intimate imminence. We invite you to encounter the Spacious One, by entering the fascinating world of the Hebrew Bible in the original Hebrew. Enroll in our live online Biblical Hebrew course and discover the depth of the Scriptures. 

Reply
Apr 7, 2021 15:45:56   #
Peewee Loc: San Antonio, TX
 
bahmer wrote:
The Hebrew Bible contains more than two dozen names for God which many of us have heard before: YHWH (“Lord”), Elohim (“God”), Sabaoth (“armies”). One of the more obscure names for God used by Jews is Ha-Makom. This literally means “the place.” What does this signify? Is God a place? How did this rather ordinary word become one of God’s holiest names?

What can we learn from Jacob’s Dream?
One of the most famous stories in the Book of Genesis, is Jacob’s dream where angels ascend and descend a ladder to heaven. It begins with these words, “He came to a certain place and stopped there for the night, for the sun had set” (Gen. 28:11). In Hebrew, “place” is makom (מקום). Where is this place? It is strange that the Torah, which is usually full of geographical details, does not specify the location. 
   
Place Transcending Space
According to an ancient Jewish interpretation of this verse, the makom which Jacob encountered is not a physical location, but God’s presence itself. The rabbis of the Talmud famously explained, “God is the place of the world, and the world is not His place.” In other words, God cannot be limited to one individual spot. Rather, God transcends space, and he is accessible to all people in all places. 

Discover the depths of the Bible
To this day, it is common to hear Jews refer to God as Ha-Makom (“the place”) in prayer. This name captures God’s eternal vastness, while emphasizing his intimate imminence. We invite you to encounter the Spacious One, by entering the fascinating world of the Hebrew Bible in the original Hebrew. Enroll in our live online Biblical Hebrew course and discover the depth of the Scriptures. 
The Hebrew Bible contains more than two dozen name... (show quote)


I love these updates. Keep-em coming. I'd appreciate the site, just in case you depart first. I'd bookmark it.

So, how's the family getting along? Has the dog adopted you yet?

Reply
Apr 7, 2021 16:25:38   #
bahmer
 
Peewee wrote:
I love these updates. Keep-em coming. I'd appreciate the site, just in case you depart first. I'd bookmark it.

So, how's the family getting along? Has the dog adopted you yet?


The family is moving in slowly but surly at present more slowly thank surly.

=Sincerely,
Dan Livni,
Biblical Hebrew Teacher,
IsraelBiblicalStudies.com

Reply
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
Faith, Religion, Spirituality
OnePoliticalPlaza.com - Forum
Copyright 2012-2021 IDF International Technologies, Inc.