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Jesus, the Jewish Messiah is hidden inside the Afikomen, in an ancient Passover tradition
Apr 4, 2021 02:14:51   #
Zemirah Loc: Sojourner En Route...
 
In today’s modern Jewish celebration of Pesach (Passover), the second or middle piece of three pieces of unleavened matzah bread is taken from a special bag called the matzah tosh. Matzah is always striped and pierced before being baked. This second of three pieces, wrapped in white linen and hidden away, is known as the afikomen.

The afikomen matzah is remarkable for its historical significance. Rabbi Hillel, whose greatest activity was between 30 B.C. - 10 A.D., drew special attention to the afikomen as he led people through Passover celebrations.

In the first century, Rabbi Gamaliel said that the unleavened matzah bread pointed to the speed at which salvation came to Israel in Egypt. Further, we know that by the first century A.D., some Jewish people viewed the bread as symbolic of the people of Israel and the hidden piece, the afikomen, as a symbol of the Messiah, who remained hidden from view.

Today, 2,000 years later, during the Passover Seder meal, the father in the family continues this ancient tradition by breaking the middle matzah, the second of three pieces, in two, places the smaller piece on top of the matzah cloth and wraps the larger piece, which is called the “afikomen,” in the clean, white linen cloth which is next to the matzah cloth.

Then, the children leave the room and while they are gone, the leader “buries” (hides) the afikomen, this wrapped piece of matzah, somewhere in the room. Then the children return. They are encouraged sometime during the meal to earnestly search for the “buried treasure” of unleavened, striped and pierced matzah bread which has been wrapped in the white linen cloth, buried out of sight, earnestly sought, and when discovered, found to be of great value to those who have found it.

This clearly parallels the events surrounding the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus.

There are many other components to the Passover Seder that point to Jesus Christ as the Jewish Messiah. But just the afikomen alone clearly symbolizes No One Else.

It is not a coincidence that the central food item of the Passover instituted in Egypt, 4,000 years ago, the unleavened matzah, clearly points to the One who was called “Messiah our Passover” by the Apostle Paul. Each year, the matzah points to the One who was sinless, striped, and pierced - the One whom John the Baptist called “the Lamb of God” - the One whose sacrifice would bring redemption from the penalty of sin.

Paul wrote of this significance in the New Testament in 1st Corinthians 6:6-8: "Your boasting is not good. Do you not know that a little leaven leavens the whole lump of dough? Clean out the old leaven, that you may be a new lump, just as you are in fact unleavened. For Messiah our Passover has been sacrificed. Let us therefore celebrate the feast (Passover), not with old leaven, nor with the leaven of malice and wickedness, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth."

A close examination of the pierced, striped unleavened matzah points to King David's prophetic writing of the Messiah in Psalm 22: "For dogs have surrounded me; a band of evildoers has encompassed me; They pierced my hands and my feet."

The prophet Zechariah also prophesied what would befall the Messiah: "And I will pour out on the house of David and on the inhabitants of Jerusalem, the Spirit of grace and of supplication, so that they will look on Me whom they have pierced; and they will mourn for Him, as one mourns an only son, and they will weep bitterly over Him, like the bitter weeping over a first-born" (Zechariah 12:10).

Isaiah wrote prophetically of the coming Suffering Servant of Israel, the One would be not only sinless, but "pierced" and "striped." "But He was pierced through for our transgressions. He was crushed for our iniquities; The chastening for our well-being fell upon Him, and by His stripes we are healed" (Isaiah 53:5).

Jesus, the Messiah, was without sin, yet He was “striped” by way of the Roman whip, and “pierced” by nails through His hands and feet and by a spear in His side.

The afikomen is the last piece of matzah to be eaten at the Pesech (Passover) Seder meal, just as during the existence of the Jerusalem Temple, the sacrificial lamb was the last thing to be eaten before ending the Seder meal.

The Afikomen must be the last thing eaten before the Seder can be completed.

Passover is the reminder of a sinless sacrifice made on our behalf by Yeshua Ha Masciach, Jesus Christ the Messiah, the lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world.

When the afikomen is eaten at the conclusion of the meal, it is a reminder of the sacrificial lamb which was eaten. Consider again the symbolism of the matzah: unleavened, striped, pierced, broken, wrapped in a white linen cloth, “buried,” diligently sought, with a reward going to the discoverer.

God’s judgment is ‘guilty’ no matter who we are – Jew or Gentile. And the wages of sin? Death. But the gift of God is eternal Life. Life with never dying there in his presence, ever. How? By the death of a substitute in our place here on earth.

Either the Messiah carries our sins, or we do. He died in full payment of them 2,000 years ago just outside the walls of Jerusalem - as our substitute, and was raised from the dead three days later just as the Hebrew Bible foresaw.

“After he has suffered, he will see the light of life.” (Isaiah 53.11)

Meaning – Our Messiah is still alive!

Now, His gift of our sin debt paid in full, resulting in eternal life with Him is freely offered, but as with all free gifts, one must accept it - otherwise it cannot be received.

His presence can be known today – personally, by anyone who believes that He is and seeks Him.

Reply
Apr 4, 2021 07:25:40   #
TexaCan Loc: Heart in W Texas - feet on the beach in Al.
 
Zemirah wrote:
In today’s modern Jewish celebration of Pesach (Passover), the second or middle piece of three pieces of unleavened matzah bread is taken from a special bag called the matzah tosh. Matzah is always striped and pierced before being baked. This second of three pieces, wrapped in white linen and hidden away, is known as the afikomen.

The afikomen matzah is remarkable for its historical significance. Rabbi Hillel, whose greatest activity was between 30 B.C. - 10 A.D., drew special attention to the afikomen as he led people through Passover celebrations.

In the first century, Rabbi Gamaliel said that the unleavened matzah bread pointed to the speed at which salvation came to Israel in Egypt. Further, we know that by the first century A.D., some Jewish people viewed the bread as symbolic of the people of Israel and the hidden piece, the afikomen, as a symbol of the Messiah, who remained hidden from view.

Today, 2,000 years later, during the Passover Seder meal, the father in the family continues this ancient tradition by breaking the middle matzah, the second of three pieces, in two, places the smaller piece on top of the matzah cloth and wraps the larger piece, which is called the “afikomen,” in the clean, white linen cloth which is next to the matzah cloth.

Then, the children leave the room and while they are gone, the leader “buries” (hides) the afikomen, this wrapped piece of matzah, somewhere in the room. Then the children return. They are encouraged sometime during the meal to earnestly search for the “buried treasure” of unleavened, striped and pierced matzah bread which has been wrapped in the white linen cloth, buried out of sight, earnestly sought, and when discovered, found to be of great value to those who have found it.

This clearly parallels the events surrounding the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus.

There are many other components to the Passover Seder that point to Jesus Christ as the Jewish Messiah. But just the afikomen alone clearly symbolizes No One Else.

It is not a coincidence that the central food item of the Passover instituted in Egypt, 4,000 years ago, the unleavened matzah, clearly points to the One who was called “Messiah our Passover” by the Apostle Paul. Each year, the matzah points to the One who was sinless, striped, and pierced - the One whom John the Baptist called “the Lamb of God” - the One whose sacrifice would bring redemption from the penalty of sin.

Paul wrote of this significance in the New Testament in 1st Corinthians 6:6-8: "Your boasting is not good. Do you not know that a little leaven leavens the whole lump of dough? Clean out the old leaven, that you may be a new lump, just as you are in fact unleavened. For Messiah our Passover has been sacrificed. Let us therefore celebrate the feast (Passover), not with old leaven, nor with the leaven of malice and wickedness, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth."

A close examination of the pierced, striped unleavened matzah points to King David's prophetic writing of the Messiah in Psalm 22: "For dogs have surrounded me; a band of evildoers has encompassed me; They pierced my hands and my feet."

The prophet Zechariah also prophesied what would befall the Messiah: "And I will pour out on the house of David and on the inhabitants of Jerusalem, the Spirit of grace and of supplication, so that they will look on Me whom they have pierced; and they will mourn for Him, as one mourns an only son, and they will weep bitterly over Him, like the bitter weeping over a first-born" (Zechariah 12:10).

Isaiah wrote prophetically of the coming Suffering Servant of Israel, the One would be not only sinless, but "pierced" and "striped." "But He was pierced through for our transgressions. He was crushed for our iniquities; The chastening for our well-being fell upon Him, and by His stripes we are healed" (Isaiah 53:5).

Jesus, the Messiah, was without sin, yet He was “striped” by way of the Roman whip, and “pierced” by nails through His hands and feet and by a spear in His side.

The afikomen is the last piece of matzah to be eaten at the Pesech (Passover) Seder meal, just as during the existence of the Jerusalem Temple, the sacrificial lamb was the last thing to be eaten before ending the Seder meal.

The Afikomen must be the last thing eaten before the Seder can be completed.

Passover is the reminder of a sinless sacrifice made on our behalf by Yeshua Ha Masciach, Jesus Christ the Messiah, the lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world.

When the afikomen is eaten at the conclusion of the meal, it is a reminder of the sacrificial lamb which was eaten. Consider again the symbolism of the matzah: unleavened, striped, pierced, broken, wrapped in a white linen cloth, “buried,” diligently sought, with a reward going to the discoverer.

God’s judgment is ‘guilty’ no matter who we are – Jew or Gentile. And the wages of sin? Death. But the gift of God is eternal Life. Life with never dying there in his presence, ever. How? By the death of a substitute in our place here on earth.

Either the Messiah carries our sins, or we do. He died in full payment of them 2,000 years ago just outside the walls of Jerusalem - as our substitute, and was raised from the dead three days later just as the Hebrew Bible foresaw.

“After he has suffered, he will see the light of life.” (Isaiah 53.11)

Meaning – Our Messiah is still alive!

Now, His gift of our sin debt paid in full, resulting in eternal life with Him is freely offered, but as with all free gifts, one must accept it - otherwise it cannot be received.

His presence can be known today – personally, by anyone who believes that He is and seeks Him.
In today’s modern Jewish celebration of Pesach (Pa... (show quote)


MARANATHA! 🙏🏻

Reply
Apr 4, 2021 08:41:37   #
Rose42
 
Zemirah wrote:
In today’s modern Jewish celebration of Pesach (Passover), the second or middle piece of three pieces of unleavened matzah bread is taken from a special bag called the matzah tosh. Matzah is always striped and pierced before being baked. This second of three pieces, wrapped in white linen and hidden away, is known as the afikomen.

The afikomen matzah is remarkable for its historical significance. Rabbi Hillel, whose greatest activity was between 30 B.C. - 10 A.D., drew special attention to the afikomen as he led people through Passover celebrations.

In the first century, Rabbi Gamaliel said that the unleavened matzah bread pointed to the speed at which salvation came to Israel in Egypt. Further, we know that by the first century A.D., some Jewish people viewed the bread as symbolic of the people of Israel and the hidden piece, the afikomen, as a symbol of the Messiah, who remained hidden from view.

Today, 2,000 years later, during the Passover Seder meal, the father in the family continues this ancient tradition by breaking the middle matzah, the second of three pieces, in two, places the smaller piece on top of the matzah cloth and wraps the larger piece, which is called the “afikomen,” in the clean, white linen cloth which is next to the matzah cloth.

Then, the children leave the room and while they are gone, the leader “buries” (hides) the afikomen, this wrapped piece of matzah, somewhere in the room. Then the children return. They are encouraged sometime during the meal to earnestly search for the “buried treasure” of unleavened, striped and pierced matzah bread which has been wrapped in the white linen cloth, buried out of sight, earnestly sought, and when discovered, found to be of great value to those who have found it.

This clearly parallels the events surrounding the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus.

There are many other components to the Passover Seder that point to Jesus Christ as the Jewish Messiah. But just the afikomen alone clearly symbolizes No One Else.

It is not a coincidence that the central food item of the Passover instituted in Egypt, 4,000 years ago, the unleavened matzah, clearly points to the One who was called “Messiah our Passover” by the Apostle Paul. Each year, the matzah points to the One who was sinless, striped, and pierced - the One whom John the Baptist called “the Lamb of God” - the One whose sacrifice would bring redemption from the penalty of sin.

Paul wrote of this significance in the New Testament in 1st Corinthians 6:6-8: "Your boasting is not good. Do you not know that a little leaven leavens the whole lump of dough? Clean out the old leaven, that you may be a new lump, just as you are in fact unleavened. For Messiah our Passover has been sacrificed. Let us therefore celebrate the feast (Passover), not with old leaven, nor with the leaven of malice and wickedness, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth."

A close examination of the pierced, striped unleavened matzah points to King David's prophetic writing of the Messiah in Psalm 22: "For dogs have surrounded me; a band of evildoers has encompassed me; They pierced my hands and my feet."

The prophet Zechariah also prophesied what would befall the Messiah: "And I will pour out on the house of David and on the inhabitants of Jerusalem, the Spirit of grace and of supplication, so that they will look on Me whom they have pierced; and they will mourn for Him, as one mourns an only son, and they will weep bitterly over Him, like the bitter weeping over a first-born" (Zechariah 12:10).

Isaiah wrote prophetically of the coming Suffering Servant of Israel, the One would be not only sinless, but "pierced" and "striped." "But He was pierced through for our transgressions. He was crushed for our iniquities; The chastening for our well-being fell upon Him, and by His stripes we are healed" (Isaiah 53:5).

Jesus, the Messiah, was without sin, yet He was “striped” by way of the Roman whip, and “pierced” by nails through His hands and feet and by a spear in His side.

The afikomen is the last piece of matzah to be eaten at the Pesech (Passover) Seder meal, just as during the existence of the Jerusalem Temple, the sacrificial lamb was the last thing to be eaten before ending the Seder meal.

The Afikomen must be the last thing eaten before the Seder can be completed.

Passover is the reminder of a sinless sacrifice made on our behalf by Yeshua Ha Masciach, Jesus Christ the Messiah, the lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world.

When the afikomen is eaten at the conclusion of the meal, it is a reminder of the sacrificial lamb which was eaten. Consider again the symbolism of the matzah: unleavened, striped, pierced, broken, wrapped in a white linen cloth, “buried,” diligently sought, with a reward going to the discoverer.

God’s judgment is ‘guilty’ no matter who we are – Jew or Gentile. And the wages of sin? Death. But the gift of God is eternal Life. Life with never dying there in his presence, ever. How? By the death of a substitute in our place here on earth.

Either the Messiah carries our sins, or we do. He died in full payment of them 2,000 years ago just outside the walls of Jerusalem - as our substitute, and was raised from the dead three days later just as the Hebrew Bible foresaw.

“After he has suffered, he will see the light of life.” (Isaiah 53.11)

Meaning – Our Messiah is still alive!

Now, His gift of our sin debt paid in full, resulting in eternal life with Him is freely offered, but as with all free gifts, one must accept it - otherwise it cannot be received.

His presence can be known today – personally, by anyone who believes that He is and seeks Him.
In today’s modern Jewish celebration of Pesach (Pa... (show quote)


Amen and amen. A blessed Easter to you all.

Reply
 
 
Apr 5, 2021 09:33:30   #
bahmer
 
Zemirah wrote:
In today’s modern Jewish celebration of Pesach (Passover), the second or middle piece of three pieces of unleavened matzah bread is taken from a special bag called the matzah tosh. Matzah is always striped and pierced before being baked. This second of three pieces, wrapped in white linen and hidden away, is known as the afikomen.

The afikomen matzah is remarkable for its historical significance. Rabbi Hillel, whose greatest activity was between 30 B.C. - 10 A.D., drew special attention to the afikomen as he led people through Passover celebrations.

In the first century, Rabbi Gamaliel said that the unleavened matzah bread pointed to the speed at which salvation came to Israel in Egypt. Further, we know that by the first century A.D., some Jewish people viewed the bread as symbolic of the people of Israel and the hidden piece, the afikomen, as a symbol of the Messiah, who remained hidden from view.

Today, 2,000 years later, during the Passover Seder meal, the father in the family continues this ancient tradition by breaking the middle matzah, the second of three pieces, in two, places the smaller piece on top of the matzah cloth and wraps the larger piece, which is called the “afikomen,” in the clean, white linen cloth which is next to the matzah cloth.

Then, the children leave the room and while they are gone, the leader “buries” (hides) the afikomen, this wrapped piece of matzah, somewhere in the room. Then the children return. They are encouraged sometime during the meal to earnestly search for the “buried treasure” of unleavened, striped and pierced matzah bread which has been wrapped in the white linen cloth, buried out of sight, earnestly sought, and when discovered, found to be of great value to those who have found it.

This clearly parallels the events surrounding the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus.

There are many other components to the Passover Seder that point to Jesus Christ as the Jewish Messiah. But just the afikomen alone clearly symbolizes No One Else.

It is not a coincidence that the central food item of the Passover instituted in Egypt, 4,000 years ago, the unleavened matzah, clearly points to the One who was called “Messiah our Passover” by the Apostle Paul. Each year, the matzah points to the One who was sinless, striped, and pierced - the One whom John the Baptist called “the Lamb of God” - the One whose sacrifice would bring redemption from the penalty of sin.

Paul wrote of this significance in the New Testament in 1st Corinthians 6:6-8: "Your boasting is not good. Do you not know that a little leaven leavens the whole lump of dough? Clean out the old leaven, that you may be a new lump, just as you are in fact unleavened. For Messiah our Passover has been sacrificed. Let us therefore celebrate the feast (Passover), not with old leaven, nor with the leaven of malice and wickedness, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth."

A close examination of the pierced, striped unleavened matzah points to King David's prophetic writing of the Messiah in Psalm 22: "For dogs have surrounded me; a band of evildoers has encompassed me; They pierced my hands and my feet."

The prophet Zechariah also prophesied what would befall the Messiah: "And I will pour out on the house of David and on the inhabitants of Jerusalem, the Spirit of grace and of supplication, so that they will look on Me whom they have pierced; and they will mourn for Him, as one mourns an only son, and they will weep bitterly over Him, like the bitter weeping over a first-born" (Zechariah 12:10).

Isaiah wrote prophetically of the coming Suffering Servant of Israel, the One would be not only sinless, but "pierced" and "striped." "But He was pierced through for our transgressions. He was crushed for our iniquities; The chastening for our well-being fell upon Him, and by His stripes we are healed" (Isaiah 53:5).

Jesus, the Messiah, was without sin, yet He was “striped” by way of the Roman whip, and “pierced” by nails through His hands and feet and by a spear in His side.

The afikomen is the last piece of matzah to be eaten at the Pesech (Passover) Seder meal, just as during the existence of the Jerusalem Temple, the sacrificial lamb was the last thing to be eaten before ending the Seder meal.

The Afikomen must be the last thing eaten before the Seder can be completed.

Passover is the reminder of a sinless sacrifice made on our behalf by Yeshua Ha Masciach, Jesus Christ the Messiah, the lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world.

When the afikomen is eaten at the conclusion of the meal, it is a reminder of the sacrificial lamb which was eaten. Consider again the symbolism of the matzah: unleavened, striped, pierced, broken, wrapped in a white linen cloth, “buried,” diligently sought, with a reward going to the discoverer.

God’s judgment is ‘guilty’ no matter who we are – Jew or Gentile. And the wages of sin? Death. But the gift of God is eternal Life. Life with never dying there in his presence, ever. How? By the death of a substitute in our place here on earth.

Either the Messiah carries our sins, or we do. He died in full payment of them 2,000 years ago just outside the walls of Jerusalem - as our substitute, and was raised from the dead three days later just as the Hebrew Bible foresaw.

“After he has suffered, he will see the light of life.” (Isaiah 53.11)

Meaning – Our Messiah is still alive!

Now, His gift of our sin debt paid in full, resulting in eternal life with Him is freely offered, but as with all free gifts, one must accept it - otherwise it cannot be received.

His presence can be known today – personally, by anyone who believes that He is and seeks Him.
In today’s modern Jewish celebration of Pesach (Pa... (show quote)


Amen and Amen it appears that one can still learn new things even at the old age of 78. Thank you Zemirah for that beautiful lesson on the Passover. Maranatha

Reply
Apr 5, 2021 18:52:36   #
lindajoy Loc: right here with you....
 
Zemirah wrote:
In today’s modern Jewish celebration of Pesach (Passover), the second or middle piece of three pieces of unleavened matzah bread is taken from a special bag called the matzah tosh. Matzah is always striped and pierced before being baked. This second of three pieces, wrapped in white linen and hidden away, is known as the afikomen.

The afikomen matzah is remarkable for its historical significance. Rabbi Hillel, whose greatest activity was between 30 B.C. - 10 A.D., drew special attention to the afikomen as he led people through Passover celebrations.

In the first century, Rabbi Gamaliel said that the unleavened matzah bread pointed to the speed at which salvation came to Israel in Egypt. Further, we know that by the first century A.D., some Jewish people viewed the bread as symbolic of the people of Israel and the hidden piece, the afikomen, as a symbol of the Messiah, who remained hidden from view.

Today, 2,000 years later, during the Passover Seder meal, the father in the family continues this ancient tradition by breaking the middle matzah, the second of three pieces, in two, places the smaller piece on top of the matzah cloth and wraps the larger piece, which is called the “afikomen,” in the clean, white linen cloth which is next to the matzah cloth.

Then, the children leave the room and while they are gone, the leader “buries” (hides) the afikomen, this wrapped piece of matzah, somewhere in the room. Then the children return. They are encouraged sometime during the meal to earnestly search for the “buried treasure” of unleavened, striped and pierced matzah bread which has been wrapped in the white linen cloth, buried out of sight, earnestly sought, and when discovered, found to be of great value to those who have found it.

This clearly parallels the events surrounding the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus.

There are many other components to the Passover Seder that point to Jesus Christ as the Jewish Messiah. But just the afikomen alone clearly symbolizes No One Else.

It is not a coincidence that the central food item of the Passover instituted in Egypt, 4,000 years ago, the unleavened matzah, clearly points to the One who was called “Messiah our Passover” by the Apostle Paul. Each year, the matzah points to the One who was sinless, striped, and pierced - the One whom John the Baptist called “the Lamb of God” - the One whose sacrifice would bring redemption from the penalty of sin.

Paul wrote of this significance in the New Testament in 1st Corinthians 6:6-8: "Your boasting is not good. Do you not know that a little leaven leavens the whole lump of dough? Clean out the old leaven, that you may be a new lump, just as you are in fact unleavened. For Messiah our Passover has been sacrificed. Let us therefore celebrate the feast (Passover), not with old leaven, nor with the leaven of malice and wickedness, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth."

A close examination of the pierced, striped unleavened matzah points to King David's prophetic writing of the Messiah in Psalm 22: "For dogs have surrounded me; a band of evildoers has encompassed me; They pierced my hands and my feet."

The prophet Zechariah also prophesied what would befall the Messiah: "And I will pour out on the house of David and on the inhabitants of Jerusalem, the Spirit of grace and of supplication, so that they will look on Me whom they have pierced; and they will mourn for Him, as one mourns an only son, and they will weep bitterly over Him, like the bitter weeping over a first-born" (Zechariah 12:10).

Isaiah wrote prophetically of the coming Suffering Servant of Israel, the One would be not only sinless, but "pierced" and "striped." "But He was pierced through for our transgressions. He was crushed for our iniquities; The chastening for our well-being fell upon Him, and by His stripes we are healed" (Isaiah 53:5).

Jesus, the Messiah, was without sin, yet He was “striped” by way of the Roman whip, and “pierced” by nails through His hands and feet and by a spear in His side.

The afikomen is the last piece of matzah to be eaten at the Pesech (Passover) Seder meal, just as during the existence of the Jerusalem Temple, the sacrificial lamb was the last thing to be eaten before ending the Seder meal.

The Afikomen must be the last thing eaten before the Seder can be completed.

Passover is the reminder of a sinless sacrifice made on our behalf by Yeshua Ha Masciach, Jesus Christ the Messiah, the lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world.

When the afikomen is eaten at the conclusion of the meal, it is a reminder of the sacrificial lamb which was eaten. Consider again the symbolism of the matzah: unleavened, striped, pierced, broken, wrapped in a white linen cloth, “buried,” diligently sought, with a reward going to the discoverer.

God’s judgment is ‘guilty’ no matter who we are – Jew or Gentile. And the wages of sin? Death. But the gift of God is eternal Life. Life with never dying there in his presence, ever. How? By the death of a substitute in our place here on earth.

Either the Messiah carries our sins, or we do. He died in full payment of them 2,000 years ago just outside the walls of Jerusalem - as our substitute, and was raised from the dead three days later just as the Hebrew Bible foresaw.

“After he has suffered, he will see the light of life.” (Isaiah 53.11)

Meaning – Our Messiah is still alive!

Now, His gift of our sin debt paid in full, resulting in eternal life with Him is freely offered, but as with all free gifts, one must accept it - otherwise it cannot be received.

His presence can be known today – personally, by anyone who believes that He is and seeks Him.
In today’s modern Jewish celebration of Pesach (Pa... (show quote)


Amen!!!Masterful and full of knowledge that needs be remembered...
Thank You for posting this, especially since it the ways and understanding of another story of another religion..

Reply
Apr 6, 2021 05:14:36   #
Zemirah Loc: Sojourner En Route...
 
It encompasses two religions truly enough, the first was Biblical Judaism, created by God, which began with Moses ca 1450 B.C., described in the Jewish Tanakh [Old Testament] and was still in force when Hillel and Gamaliel both featured the Afikomen in their Pasech Seders in the first century.

The 2nd religion is modern Rabbinical Judaism [alternative title: Talmudic Judaism], the manmade form of Judaism that developed after the destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem in 70 A.D.. Originating in the work of the Pharisaic rabbis, the tannaim (teachers) (135–c. 200), it was based on the legal and commentative literature in the manmade Talmud, a collection of writings that covers the full gamut of Jewish law and tradition, compiled and edited between the third and sixth centuries. Talmud is Hebrew for "learning," appropriate for a text that people devote their lives to studying and mastering, and it set up a mode of worship and a life discipline that were to be practiced by Jews worldwide down to modern times, BUT it is not Scripture.

During the lifetime of Jesus, the holy temple in Jerusalem was the center of Jewish religious life. The temple was the place where animal sacrifices were carried out and worship according to the Law of Moses was followed faithfully.

Hebrews 9:1-9 tells us that in the temple a veil separated the Holy of Holies—the earthly dwelling place of God’s presence—from the rest of the temple where men dwelt. This signified that man was separated from God by sin (Isaiah 59:1-2).

Only the high priest was permitted to pass beyond this veil once each year (Exodus 30:10; Hebrews 9:7) to enter into God’s presence for all of Israel and make atonement for their sins (Leviticus 16).

God signaled the end of Biblical Judaism the night of the crucifixion, when, after Jesus' death on the cross of Calvary, the heavy Temple veil separating the Holy of Holies (where the Ruach HaKodesh, the Holy Spirit dwelt), from the Sanctuary, was split in two, and God, the Holy Spirit (3rd personality within the Triune Godhead, possessing all of the attributes of Deity, infinite, eternal, unchangeable, indivisible, omnipresent, omnipotent, omniscient, personal, and perfect in wisdom, power, holiness) departed from the Jerusalem Temple...

Biblical Judaism was based on the continual sacrificial slaughter of animals to atone for sin, so, after Jesus' sacrificial death and resurrection, there was no longer any sacrifice required, ever, in God's eyes, because Jesus' sacrifice, unlike the blood of sheep and goats, would stand forever.

If we have come by faith believing in the all sufficient sacrifice for sin made by Jesus Christ it is great comfort to know God remembers them no more. He is a God who "remembers" and "forgets" our sins based on the atoning sacrifice of Christ. "For it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins" (Hebrews 10:4).

Hebrews 10-26: For such "there remaineth no longer a sacrifice for sins:" that offering of Jesus which they deliberately reject has abolished all the earlier sacrifices. The observances and ceremonies of Biblical Judaism, which had been full of meaning while they pointed to Him that was to come, have now lost all their virtue through His coming.

Hebrews 10:8-9:
"First, Christ said, "You did not want animal sacrifices or sin offerings or burnt offerings or other offerings for sin, nor were you pleased with them" [although they are required by the law of Moses].
Then he said, "Look, I have come to do your will."

Hebrews 10:1-18: Jesus Christ, the Final Sacrifice

Hebrews is a word of exhortation, centering on Jesus Christ our high priest. it is laid out in 10:1-18. He is upheld as the final sacrifice.
"There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. For the law of the Spirit of life has set you free in Christ Jesus from the law of sin and death. For God has done what the law, weakened by the flesh, could not do."

Jesus' Sacrifice "a Ransom for Many"- Matthew 20:28

Jesus' sacrifice is "a corresponding ransom for all" those who take the steps necessary to benefit from it. —1 Timothy 2: 5, 6. par. 7 In the Bible, the original words translated "ransom" convey the idea of a price, or thing of value, that is paid.

The sacrifice of Jesus Christ eliminates the old and provides the new. The old is done away with there in verse 8 and the new comes in verse 9. The law was given by Moses, says John 1:17, but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. God planned a better sacrifice and shows here that the old must be put away.

Jesus died for our sins ...

The Temple sacrifices were only temporary, needing continual renewal, and were really a foreshadowing of the perfect, once-for-all sacrifice of Christ on the cross (Hebrews 10:10).

This is why Jesus came and why He died, to become the ultimate and final sacrifice, the perfect (without blemish) sacrifice for our sins (Colossians 1:22; 1 Peter 1:19).

However, because the Jewish religious leaders refused to accept Jesus as their promised Messiah, seeking a worldly ruler instead, they instituted their own form of Judaism, which, today is split between different branches including Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, Reconstructionist, and the Ultra Orthodox, comprised of the Chabad, the Lubivitchers and the Chasidim.


lindajoy wrote:
Amen!!!Masterful and full of knowledge that needs be remembered...
Thank You for posting this, especially since it the ways and understanding of another story of another religion..

Reply
Apr 6, 2021 06:25:54   #
lindajoy Loc: right here with you....
 
Zemirah wrote:
It encompasses two religions truly enough, the first was Biblical Judaism, created by God, which began with Moses ca 1450 B.C., described in the Jewish Tanakh [Old Testament] and was still in force when Hillel and Gamaliel both featured the Afikomen in their Pasech Seders in the first century.

The 2nd religion is modern Rabbinical Judaism [alternative title: Talmudic Judaism], the manmade form of Judaism that developed after the destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem in 70 A.D.. Originating in the work of the Pharisaic rabbis, the tannaim (teachers) (135–c. 200), it was based on the legal and commentative literature in the manmade Talmud, a collection of writings that covers the full gamut of Jewish law and tradition, compiled and edited between the third and sixth centuries. Talmud is Hebrew for "learning," appropriate for a text that people devote their lives to studying and mastering, and it set up a mode of worship and a life discipline that were to be practiced by Jews worldwide down to modern times, BUT it is not Scripture.

During the lifetime of Jesus, the holy temple in Jerusalem was the center of Jewish religious life. The temple was the place where animal sacrifices were carried out and worship according to the Law of Moses was followed faithfully.

Hebrews 9:1-9 tells us that in the temple a veil separated the Holy of Holies—the earthly dwelling place of God’s presence—from the rest of the temple where men dwelt. This signified that man was separated from God by sin (Isaiah 59:1-2).

Only the high priest was permitted to pass beyond this veil once each year (Exodus 30:10; Hebrews 9:7) to enter into God’s presence for all of Israel and make atonement for their sins (Leviticus 16).

God signaled the end of Biblical Judaism the night of the crucifixion, when, after Jesus' death on the cross of Calvary, the heavy Temple veil separating the Holy of Holies (where the Ruach HaKodesh, the Holy Spirit dwelt), from the Sanctuary, was split in two, and God, the Holy Spirit (3rd personality within the Triune Godhead, possessing all of the attributes of Deity, infinite, eternal, unchangeable, indivisible, omnipresent, omnipotent, omniscient, personal, and perfect in wisdom, power, holiness) departed from the Jerusalem Temple...

Biblical Judaism was based on the continual sacrificial slaughter of animals to atone for sin, so, after Jesus' sacrificial death and resurrection, there was no longer any sacrifice required, ever, in God's eyes, because Jesus' sacrifice, unlike the blood of sheep and goats, would stand forever.

If we have come by faith believing in the all sufficient sacrifice for sin made by Jesus Christ it is great comfort to know God remembers them no more. He is a God who "remembers" and "forgets" our sins based on the atoning sacrifice of Christ. "For it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins" (Hebrews 10:4).

Hebrews 10-26: For such "there remaineth no longer a sacrifice for sins:" that offering of Jesus which they deliberately reject has abolished all the earlier sacrifices. The observances and ceremonies of Biblical Judaism, which had been full of meaning while they pointed to Him that was to come, have now lost all their virtue through His coming.

Hebrews 10:8-9:
"First, Christ said, "You did not want animal sacrifices or sin offerings or burnt offerings or other offerings for sin, nor were you pleased with them" [although they are required by the law of Moses].
Then he said, "Look, I have come to do your will."

Hebrews 10:1-18: Jesus Christ, the Final Sacrifice

Hebrews is a word of exhortation, centering on Jesus Christ our high priest. it is laid out in 10:1-18. He is upheld as the final sacrifice.
"There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. For the law of the Spirit of life has set you free in Christ Jesus from the law of sin and death. For God has done what the law, weakened by the flesh, could not do."

Jesus' Sacrifice "a Ransom for Many"- Matthew 20:28

Jesus' sacrifice is "a corresponding ransom for all" those who take the steps necessary to benefit from it. —1 Timothy 2: 5, 6. par. 7 In the Bible, the original words translated "ransom" convey the idea of a price, or thing of value, that is paid.

The sacrifice of Jesus Christ eliminates the old and provides the new. The old is done away with there in verse 8 and the new comes in verse 9. The law was given by Moses, says John 1:17, but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. God planned a better sacrifice and shows here that the old must be put away.

Jesus died for our sins ...

The Temple sacrifices were only temporary, needing continual renewal, and were really a foreshadowing of the perfect, once-for-all sacrifice of Christ on the cross (Hebrews 10:10).

This is why Jesus came and why He died, to become the ultimate and final sacrifice, the perfect (without blemish) sacrifice for our sins (Colossians 1:22; 1 Peter 1:19).

However, because the Jewish religious leaders refused to accept Jesus as their promised Messiah, seeking a worldly ruler instead, they instituted their own form of Judaism, which, today is split between different branches including Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, Reconstructionist, and the Ultra Orthodox, comprised of the Chabad, the Lubivitchers and the Chasidim.
It encompasses two religions truly enough, the fir... (show quote)


I wish to Thank you for sharing such a succinct understanding of the old vs the new testament of events...

I had read about the change of sacrificial animals after Jesus crucifixion. He, in effect taking all sins, and no longer a need for Moses teaching of the sacrificial or temporary needs any longer.. Made perfect sense in that Jesus stood in the place of all sins...

This rings true to my heart and Faith:
If we have come by faith believing in the all sufficient sacrifice for sin made by Jesus Christ it is great comfort to know God remembers them no more. He is a God who "remembers" and "forgets" our sins based on the atoning sacrifice of Christ. "For it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins" (Hebrews 10:4).

If we come by faith ~the key to all of the teachings...

I kept this post as I want to share it with my sister in law... Born of a jewish family she struggles with the “ Jews not believing Christ has come” and her personal reverence that she believes He has... She basically honors her family, in the “traditions”as she puts it, while also celebrating Christian traditions of worship as well..She does believe and most certainly is of faith but questions her ways .. I tell her in her choice she does what is the ultimate~~ is a believer of Faith and questioning is very good .. I hope this will bring a bit of clarity for her as it did for me..Ever so Thankful...

Reply
 
 
Apr 6, 2021 08:54:15   #
bahmer
 
Zemirah wrote:
It encompasses two religions truly enough, the first was Biblical Judaism, created by God, which began with Moses ca 1450 B.C., described in the Jewish Tanakh [Old Testament] and was still in force when Hillel and Gamaliel both featured the Afikomen in their Pasech Seders in the first century.

The 2nd religion is modern Rabbinical Judaism [alternative title: Talmudic Judaism], the manmade form of Judaism that developed after the destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem in 70 A.D.. Originating in the work of the Pharisaic rabbis, the tannaim (teachers) (135–c. 200), it was based on the legal and commentative literature in the manmade Talmud, a collection of writings that covers the full gamut of Jewish law and tradition, compiled and edited between the third and sixth centuries. Talmud is Hebrew for "learning," appropriate for a text that people devote their lives to studying and mastering, and it set up a mode of worship and a life discipline that were to be practiced by Jews worldwide down to modern times, BUT it is not Scripture.

During the lifetime of Jesus, the holy temple in Jerusalem was the center of Jewish religious life. The temple was the place where animal sacrifices were carried out and worship according to the Law of Moses was followed faithfully.

Hebrews 9:1-9 tells us that in the temple a veil separated the Holy of Holies—the earthly dwelling place of God’s presence—from the rest of the temple where men dwelt. This signified that man was separated from God by sin (Isaiah 59:1-2).

Only the high priest was permitted to pass beyond this veil once each year (Exodus 30:10; Hebrews 9:7) to enter into God’s presence for all of Israel and make atonement for their sins (Leviticus 16).

God signaled the end of Biblical Judaism the night of the crucifixion, when, after Jesus' death on the cross of Calvary, the heavy Temple veil separating the Holy of Holies (where the Ruach HaKodesh, the Holy Spirit dwelt), from the Sanctuary, was split in two, and God, the Holy Spirit (3rd personality within the Triune Godhead, possessing all of the attributes of Deity, infinite, eternal, unchangeable, indivisible, omnipresent, omnipotent, omniscient, personal, and perfect in wisdom, power, holiness) departed from the Jerusalem Temple...

Biblical Judaism was based on the continual sacrificial slaughter of animals to atone for sin, so, after Jesus' sacrificial death and resurrection, there was no longer any sacrifice required, ever, in God's eyes, because Jesus' sacrifice, unlike the blood of sheep and goats, would stand forever.

If we have come by faith believing in the all sufficient sacrifice for sin made by Jesus Christ it is great comfort to know God remembers them no more. He is a God who "remembers" and "forgets" our sins based on the atoning sacrifice of Christ. "For it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins" (Hebrews 10:4).

Hebrews 10-26: For such "there remaineth no longer a sacrifice for sins:" that offering of Jesus which they deliberately reject has abolished all the earlier sacrifices. The observances and ceremonies of Biblical Judaism, which had been full of meaning while they pointed to Him that was to come, have now lost all their virtue through His coming.

Hebrews 10:8-9:
"First, Christ said, "You did not want animal sacrifices or sin offerings or burnt offerings or other offerings for sin, nor were you pleased with them" [although they are required by the law of Moses].
Then he said, "Look, I have come to do your will."

Hebrews 10:1-18: Jesus Christ, the Final Sacrifice

Hebrews is a word of exhortation, centering on Jesus Christ our high priest. it is laid out in 10:1-18. He is upheld as the final sacrifice.
"There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. For the law of the Spirit of life has set you free in Christ Jesus from the law of sin and death. For God has done what the law, weakened by the flesh, could not do."

Jesus' Sacrifice "a Ransom for Many"- Matthew 20:28

Jesus' sacrifice is "a corresponding ransom for all" those who take the steps necessary to benefit from it. —1 Timothy 2: 5, 6. par. 7 In the Bible, the original words translated "ransom" convey the idea of a price, or thing of value, that is paid.

The sacrifice of Jesus Christ eliminates the old and provides the new. The old is done away with there in verse 8 and the new comes in verse 9. The law was given by Moses, says John 1:17, but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. God planned a better sacrifice and shows here that the old must be put away.

Jesus died for our sins ...

The Temple sacrifices were only temporary, needing continual renewal, and were really a foreshadowing of the perfect, once-for-all sacrifice of Christ on the cross (Hebrews 10:10).

This is why Jesus came and why He died, to become the ultimate and final sacrifice, the perfect (without blemish) sacrifice for our sins (Colossians 1:22; 1 Peter 1:19).

However, because the Jewish religious leaders refused to accept Jesus as their promised Messiah, seeking a worldly ruler instead, they instituted their own form of Judaism, which, today is split between different branches including Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, Reconstructionist, and the Ultra Orthodox, comprised of the Chabad, the Lubivitchers and the Chasidim.
It encompasses two religions truly enough, the fir... (show quote)


Amen and Amen

Reply
Apr 7, 2021 06:11:07   #
Zemirah Loc: Sojourner En Route...
 
There are many congregations of Messianic Jewish believers (in Jesus as the Jewish Messiah) throughout our country now.

Your sister-in-law probably has such congregations close by, if she's interested, or doesn't already have such a group located, with which she could fellowship.

Hearing a Messianic Jewish Rabbi expound on the fulfillment of the Biblical Prophecies is a joy, as they seem to develop a special God given insight... and their services always include Davidic dancing for those who wish to participate, something you'd be hard put to find in most staid Protestant services.



lindajoy wrote:
I wish to Thank you for sharing such a succinct understanding of the old vs the new testament of events...

I had read about the change of sacrificial animals after Jesus crucifixion. He, in effect taking all sins, and no longer a need for Moses teaching of the sacrificial or temporary needs any longer.. Made perfect sense in that Jesus stood in the place of all sins...

This rings true to my heart and Faith:
If we have come by faith believing in the all sufficient sacrifice for sin made by Jesus Christ it is great comfort to know God remembers them no more. He is a God who "remembers" and "forgets" our sins based on the atoning sacrifice of Christ. "For it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins" (Hebrews 10:4).

If we come by faith ~the key to all of the teachings...

I kept this post as I want to share it with my sister in law... Born of a jewish family she struggles with the “ Jews not believing Christ has come” and her personal reverence that she believes He has... She basically honors her family, in the “traditions”as she puts it, while also celebrating Christian traditions of worship as well..She does believe and most certainly is of faith but questions her ways .. I tell her in her choice she does what is the ultimate~~ is a believer of Faith and questioning is very good .. I hope this will bring a bit of clarity for her as it did for me..Ever so Thankful...
I wish to Thank you for sharing such a succinct un... (show quote)

Reply
Apr 7, 2021 06:39:36   #
lindajoy Loc: right here with you....
 
Zemirah wrote:
There are many congregations of Messianic Jewish believers (in Jesus as the Jewish Messiah) throughout our country now.

Your sister-in-law probably has such congregations close by, if she's interested, or doesn't already have such a group located, with which she could fellowship.

Hearing a Messianic Jewish Rabbi expound on the fulfillment of the Biblical Prophecies is a joy, as they seem to develop a special God given insight... and their services always include Davidic dancing for those who wish to participate, something you'd be hard put to find in most staid Protestant services.
There are many congregations of Messianic Jewish b... (show quote)


She does have a church she visits occasionally with her mother, as well as a Non denominational church she and my brother visit...

I’m familiar with the Davidic dancing because she shared it with me and let me tell you it's an active dance that winds you if not used to it...A lot of constant moving around...lolol 🙆🏻‍♀️

Reply
Apr 7, 2021 06:51:54   #
Zemirah Loc: Sojourner En Route...
 
Yes, the Davidic dancing I've experienced...

I attended a Messianic congregation in Indianapolis every Saturday evening for a few years during the late 80s, early 90s, but no longer able to be that active.

I've attended various services of five different denominations within Judaism in past years: Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, and Reconstructionists, also attended Chabad Lubavitch (ultra orthodox) on Purim; -

and have attended Messianic Jewish conventions in Cincinnati, Ohio, in Seattle, WA and at the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, Illinois.

Wonderful memories!

Addendum: Also attended a few meetings at a Messianic congregation in Ft. Collins, CO when my son was at their Atmospheric Science School in Ft. Collins in the late 80s.


lindajoy wrote:
She does have a church she visits occasionally with her mother, as well as a Non denominational church she and my brother visit...

I’m familiar with the Davidic dancing because she shared it with me and let me tell you it's an active dance that winds you if not used to it...A lot of constant moving around...lolol 🙆🏻‍♀️

Reply
 
 
Apr 7, 2021 08:13:02   #
lindajoy Loc: right here with you....
 
Zemirah wrote:
Yes, the Davidic dancing I've experienced...

I attended a Messianic congregation in Indianapolis every Saturday evening for a few years during the late 80s, early 90s, but no longer able to be that active.

I've attended various services of five different denominations within Judaism in past years: Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, and Reconstructionists, also attended Chabad Lubavitch (ultra orthodox) on Purim; -

and have attended Messianic Jewish conventions in Cincinnati, Ohio, in Seattle, WA and at the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, Illinois.

Wonderful memories!

Addendum: Also attended a few meetings at a Messianic congregation in Ft. Collins, CO when my son was at their Atmospheric Science School in Ft. Collins in the late 80s.
Yes, the Davidic dancing I've experienced... br b... (show quote)


No wonder you have such vast knowledge and share so beautifully...I bet great memories..!

I have friends that live in FT. Collins..
More settled and quieter there than the Denver area..

What an interesting field your son chose!!

Reply
Apr 8, 2021 01:36:12   #
Armageddun Loc: The show me state
 
Zemirah wrote:
In today’s modern Jewish celebration of Pesach (Passover), the second or middle piece of three pieces of unleavened matzah bread is taken from a special bag called the matzah tosh. Matzah is always striped and pierced before being baked. This second of three pieces, wrapped in white linen and hidden away, is known as the afikomen.

The afikomen matzah is remarkable for its historical significance. Rabbi Hillel, whose greatest activity was between 30 B.C. - 10 A.D., drew special attention to the afikomen as he led people through Passover celebrations.

In the first century, Rabbi Gamaliel said that the unleavened matzah bread pointed to the speed at which salvation came to Israel in Egypt. Further, we know that by the first century A.D., some Jewish people viewed the bread as symbolic of the people of Israel and the hidden piece, the afikomen, as a symbol of the Messiah, who remained hidden from view.

Today, 2,000 years later, during the Passover Seder meal, the father in the family continues this ancient tradition by breaking the middle matzah, the second of three pieces, in two, places the smaller piece on top of the matzah cloth and wraps the larger piece, which is called the “afikomen,” in the clean, white linen cloth which is next to the matzah cloth.

Then, the children leave the room and while they are gone, the leader “buries” (hides) the afikomen, this wrapped piece of matzah, somewhere in the room. Then the children return. They are encouraged sometime during the meal to earnestly search for the “buried treasure” of unleavened, striped and pierced matzah bread which has been wrapped in the white linen cloth, buried out of sight, earnestly sought, and when discovered, found to be of great value to those who have found it.

This clearly parallels the events surrounding the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus.

There are many other components to the Passover Seder that point to Jesus Christ as the Jewish Messiah. But just the afikomen alone clearly symbolizes No One Else.

It is not a coincidence that the central food item of the Passover instituted in Egypt, 4,000 years ago, the unleavened matzah, clearly points to the One who was called “Messiah our Passover” by the Apostle Paul. Each year, the matzah points to the One who was sinless, striped, and pierced - the One whom John the Baptist called “the Lamb of God” - the One whose sacrifice would bring redemption from the penalty of sin.

Paul wrote of this significance in the New Testament in 1st Corinthians 6:6-8: "Your boasting is not good. Do you not know that a little leaven leavens the whole lump of dough? Clean out the old leaven, that you may be a new lump, just as you are in fact unleavened. For Messiah our Passover has been sacrificed. Let us therefore celebrate the feast (Passover), not with old leaven, nor with the leaven of malice and wickedness, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth."

A close examination of the pierced, striped unleavened matzah points to King David's prophetic writing of the Messiah in Psalm 22: "For dogs have surrounded me; a band of evildoers has encompassed me; They pierced my hands and my feet."

The prophet Zechariah also prophesied what would befall the Messiah: "And I will pour out on the house of David and on the inhabitants of Jerusalem, the Spirit of grace and of supplication, so that they will look on Me whom they have pierced; and they will mourn for Him, as one mourns an only son, and they will weep bitterly over Him, like the bitter weeping over a first-born" (Zechariah 12:10).

Isaiah wrote prophetically of the coming Suffering Servant of Israel, the One would be not only sinless, but "pierced" and "striped." "But He was pierced through for our transgressions. He was crushed for our iniquities; The chastening for our well-being fell upon Him, and by His stripes we are healed" (Isaiah 53:5).

Jesus, the Messiah, was without sin, yet He was “striped” by way of the Roman whip, and “pierced” by nails through His hands and feet and by a spear in His side.

The afikomen is the last piece of matzah to be eaten at the Pesech (Passover) Seder meal, just as during the existence of the Jerusalem Temple, the sacrificial lamb was the last thing to be eaten before ending the Seder meal.

The Afikomen must be the last thing eaten before the Seder can be completed.

Passover is the reminder of a sinless sacrifice made on our behalf by Yeshua Ha Masciach, Jesus Christ the Messiah, the lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world.

When the afikomen is eaten at the conclusion of the meal, it is a reminder of the sacrificial lamb which was eaten. Consider again the symbolism of the matzah: unleavened, striped, pierced, broken, wrapped in a white linen cloth, “buried,” diligently sought, with a reward going to the discoverer.

God’s judgment is ‘guilty’ no matter who we are – Jew or Gentile. And the wages of sin? Death. But the gift of God is eternal Life. Life with never dying there in his presence, ever. How? By the death of a substitute in our place here on earth.

Either the Messiah carries our sins, or we do. He died in full payment of them 2,000 years ago just outside the walls of Jerusalem - as our substitute, and was raised from the dead three days later just as the Hebrew Bible foresaw.

“After he has suffered, he will see the light of life.” (Isaiah 53.11)

Meaning – Our Messiah is still alive!

Now, His gift of our sin debt paid in full, resulting in eternal life with Him is freely offered, but as with all free gifts, one must accept it - otherwise it cannot be received.

His presence can be known today – personally, by anyone who believes that He is and seeks Him.
In today’s modern Jewish celebration of Pesach (Pa... (show quote)


WOW!!!! Amen and Amen

Reply
Apr 22, 2021 09:03:30   #
Zemirah Loc: Sojourner En Route...
 
Actually, Linda, after thinking about that,

90% of any knowledge I've retained about Judaism, excluding Messianic Judaism, which is completed Judaism, as God intended it to be; is from reading and studying dozens of books for many years, on the history of Judaism and of Israel: their beliefs (comparing them with Scripture), how they chose to interpret, and reinterpret their God given Scriptures, and their many many additions, rules and regulations, to those Scriptures.

What could have been learned based only upon my own limited personal experience, by interacting with those of any given religion, is quite limited in comparison to learning about God's active participation in the development of the Jewish people, and of Israel as the land to which Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and their progeny were given permanent ownership, from His Word, and complimentary accompanying literature.

That's also true for the years spent in an office setting with Arab Muslims. If not reinforced by years of reading and studying histories of Islam, and how it has played out in different countries, through the centuries, and reading the Qur'an, comparing it with the Bible (no comparison), it would be possible to have superficial knowledge of their culture, but still know little about what Islam actually teaches, and what it doesn't teach.

That's even more true of Roman Catholicism, other Christian denominations, and major world religions, having bought the official Vatican endorsed Catholic Encyclopedia and Catholic Catechism and compared them with Scripture...

have had courses of academic coursework, plus one-day Seminars, weekend Workshops, and in forty years (since 1980), through the grace of God, the accumulation of a personal library of 6,000 books, - hours and hours of reading, whenever possible, for days, weeks, months, and years, and loved every minute of it.

All those in Christ are each given different spiritual gifts, as the Holy Spirit determines (1st Corinthians 12:11), not by our choice, - and different interests, and being true to them is the wisest thing we can do, during this one lifetime allotted us.

When called home, it will be possible to go with no regrets.


lindajoy wrote:
No wonder you have such vast knowledge and share so beautifully...I bet great memories..!

I have friends that live in FT. Collins..
More settled and quieter there than the Denver area..

What an interesting field your son chose!!

Reply
May 19, 2021 12:23:55   #
Armageddun Loc: The show me state
 
Zemirah wrote:
It encompasses two religions truly enough, the first was Biblical Judaism, created by God, which began with Moses ca 1450 B.C., described in the Jewish Tanakh [Old Testament] and was still in force when Hillel and Gamaliel both featured the Afikomen in their Pasech Seders in the first century.

The 2nd religion is modern Rabbinical Judaism [alternative title: Talmudic Judaism], the manmade form of Judaism that developed after the destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem in 70 A.D.. Originating in the work of the Pharisaic rabbis, the tannaim (teachers) (135–c. 200), it was based on the legal and commentative literature in the manmade Talmud, a collection of writings that covers the full gamut of Jewish law and tradition, compiled and edited between the third and sixth centuries. Talmud is Hebrew for "learning," appropriate for a text that people devote their lives to studying and mastering, and it set up a mode of worship and a life discipline that were to be practiced by Jews worldwide down to modern times, BUT it is not Scripture.

During the lifetime of Jesus, the holy temple in Jerusalem was the center of Jewish religious life. The temple was the place where animal sacrifices were carried out and worship according to the Law of Moses was followed faithfully.

Hebrews 9:1-9 tells us that in the temple a veil separated the Holy of Holies—the earthly dwelling place of God’s presence—from the rest of the temple where men dwelt. This signified that man was separated from God by sin (Isaiah 59:1-2).

Only the high priest was permitted to pass beyond this veil once each year (Exodus 30:10; Hebrews 9:7) to enter into God’s presence for all of Israel and make atonement for their sins (Leviticus 16).

God signaled the end of Biblical Judaism the night of the crucifixion, when, after Jesus' death on the cross of Calvary, the heavy Temple veil separating the Holy of Holies (where the Ruach HaKodesh, the Holy Spirit dwelt), from the Sanctuary, was split in two, and God, the Holy Spirit (3rd personality within the Triune Godhead, possessing all of the attributes of Deity, infinite, eternal, unchangeable, indivisible, omnipresent, omnipotent, omniscient, personal, and perfect in wisdom, power, holiness) departed from the Jerusalem Temple...

Biblical Judaism was based on the continual sacrificial slaughter of animals to atone for sin, so, after Jesus' sacrificial death and resurrection, there was no longer any sacrifice required, ever, in God's eyes, because Jesus' sacrifice, unlike the blood of sheep and goats, would stand forever.

If we have come by faith believing in the all sufficient sacrifice for sin made by Jesus Christ it is great comfort to know God remembers them no more. He is a God who "remembers" and "forgets" our sins based on the atoning sacrifice of Christ. "For it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins" (Hebrews 10:4).

Hebrews 10-26: For such "there remaineth no longer a sacrifice for sins:" that offering of Jesus which they deliberately reject has abolished all the earlier sacrifices. The observances and ceremonies of Biblical Judaism, which had been full of meaning while they pointed to Him that was to come, have now lost all their virtue through His coming.

Hebrews 10:8-9:
"First, Christ said, "You did not want animal sacrifices or sin offerings or burnt offerings or other offerings for sin, nor were you pleased with them" [although they are required by the law of Moses].
Then he said, "Look, I have come to do your will."

Hebrews 10:1-18: Jesus Christ, the Final Sacrifice

Hebrews is a word of exhortation, centering on Jesus Christ our high priest. it is laid out in 10:1-18. He is upheld as the final sacrifice.
"There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. For the law of the Spirit of life has set you free in Christ Jesus from the law of sin and death. For God has done what the law, weakened by the flesh, could not do."

Jesus' Sacrifice "a Ransom for Many"- Matthew 20:28

Jesus' sacrifice is "a corresponding ransom for all" those who take the steps necessary to benefit from it. —1 Timothy 2: 5, 6. par. 7 In the Bible, the original words translated "ransom" convey the idea of a price, or thing of value, that is paid.

The sacrifice of Jesus Christ eliminates the old and provides the new. The old is done away with there in verse 8 and the new comes in verse 9. The law was given by Moses, says John 1:17, but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. God planned a better sacrifice and shows here that the old must be put away.

Jesus died for our sins ...

The Temple sacrifices were only temporary, needing continual renewal, and were really a foreshadowing of the perfect, once-for-all sacrifice of Christ on the cross (Hebrews 10:10).

This is why Jesus came and why He died, to become the ultimate and final sacrifice, the perfect (without blemish) sacrifice for our sins (Colossians 1:22; 1 Peter 1:19).

However, because the Jewish religious leaders refused to accept Jesus as their promised Messiah, seeking a worldly ruler instead, they instituted their own form of Judaism, which, today is split between different branches including Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, Reconstructionist, and the Ultra Orthodox, comprised of the Chabad, the Lubivitchers and the Chasidim.
It encompasses two religions truly enough, the fir... (show quote)


Amen

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