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Trump Hasn't Worn A Mask Publicly. Here's What Might Convince Him To
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May 25, 2020 10:47:28   #
GoCubs Loc: Earth
 
On this Memorial Day weekend, beaches have reopened and people are venturing outside. And images and videos have circulated of some crowded beaches, pools and boardwalks in Maryland, Florida, Missouri, Texas and California.

And many people didn't heed warnings and weren't wearing masks.

It's perhaps not surprising when you consider President Trump — who as president sets the tone for so much of the country, especially for his supporters — has refused to be seen wearing a mask publicly.

"I had one on before," Trump said last week at a Ford Motor Co. plant in Michigan. "I wore one in this back area. I didn't want to give the press the pleasure of seeing it."

The "pleasure" of seeing it? It's odd that, as the country approaches 100,000 deaths from the coronavirus, the president would feel wearing a mask was somehow something the press might mock him for, especially when his own administration's guidelines say to wear one when out in public and within 6 feet of someone.

It's important to remember that Trump is the one who changed the narrative on wearing masks in the first place. It wasn't that long ago that his administration was recommending that healthy people not wear masks, so supplies weren't scarce for health care workers and first responders who needed them. Then it was Trump who told people that wearing face coverings and scarves could make a big difference.

So this idea emerging that being seen wearing a mask somehow is a virtue signal for which party you belong to — and some thinking it infringes on their civil liberties or makes them look weak — is just not helpful to stopping the spread of the virus.

Many Republican leaders are saying so, too.

"If someone is wearing a mask, they're not doing it to represent what political party they're in or what candidates they support," North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum, a Republican, said in an emotional statement Friday. His voice started to break and he started to tear up, as he continued, "They might be doing it because they've got a 5-year-old child who's been going through cancer treatments. They might have vulnerable adults in their life, who currently have COVID and they're fighting."

Similarly, Republican Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine said Sunday on NBC's Meet the Press: "This is not about politics. This is not about whether you are liberal or conservative, left or right, Republican or Democrat."

Dr. Stephen Hahn, head of the Food and Drug Administration, tweeted a warning Sunday that "the coronavirus is not yet contained" and he reminded Americans that "social distancing, hand washing and wearing masks protect us all."

Also on Meet The Press, the president's national security adviser, Robert O'Brien, shifted the focus from health to the economy, making the argument to wear a mask this way: "Mask usage is going to help us get this economy reopened."

Maybe that's an argument that will stick with the president, and one — if he's convinced — he can translate to his conservative base, which has grown increasingly more concerned with reopening businesses than the health impact of COVID-19.

But that's a big if.

Three things to watch this week:

1) 100,000 coronavirus deaths: It's a staggering number, but the country is approaching 100,000 deaths attributed to COVID-19. It's something that was seemingly unfathomable two to three months ago. "You have 15 people, and the 15 within a couple of days is going to be down to close to zero," Trump said on Feb. 26. A month later, in late March, he downplayed the deadliness of coronavirus again, saying 36,000 on average die from the flu every year: "So you say to yourself, 'What is this all about?' " At that point, just over 700 Americans had died from COVID-19.

States are reopening, and experts are concerned about potential spikes, especially if people flaunt social distancing restrictions the way some did this weekend.

2) Trump goes to Baltimore, but its mayor doesn't want him there: Trump on Monday will participate in a Memorial Day ceremony at Baltimore's Fort McHenry. But the city's mayor said he doesn't think Trump should come. "We don't need to be spending our resources for the president who's coming here under our orders to stay at home. I think he's violating the law," Mayor Jack Young said last week.

Trump didn't win any friends in Baltimore last year, when he referred to the late Rep. Elijah Cummings' district in Baltimore as "a disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess."

3) Speaking of going places others aren't supposed to...: Trump and Vice President Pence are scheduled to go to a NASA/SpaceX launch in Florida on Wednesday. But on May 1, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine urged Americans to stay away due to coronavirus concerns. "We're asking people not to travel to Kennedy [Space Center], but to watch online or watch on your television at home," he said.

It wouldn't be the first time the president has flouted his own administration's public guidance and declined to set an example. Trump is eager to show a country getting back to normal so he can tout improvement ahead of his reelection bid.

| Reply
May 25, 2020 11:00:57   #
bestpal38 Loc: Cedar City, Utah
 
GoCubs wrote:
On this Memorial Day weekend, beaches have reopened and people are venturing outside. And images and videos have circulated of some crowded beaches, pools and boardwalks in Maryland, Florida, Missouri, Texas and California.

And many people didn't heed warnings and weren't wearing masks.

It's perhaps not surprising when you consider President Trump — who as president sets the tone for so much of the country, especially for his supporters — has refused to be seen wearing a mask publicly.

"I had one on before," Trump said last week at a Ford Motor Co. plant in Michigan. "I wore one in this back area. I didn't want to give the press the pleasure of seeing it."

The "pleasure" of seeing it? It's odd that, as the country approaches 100,000 deaths from the coronavirus, the president would feel wearing a mask was somehow something the press might mock him for, especially when his own administration's guidelines say to wear one when out in public and within 6 feet of someone.

It's important to remember that Trump is the one who changed the narrative on wearing masks in the first place. It wasn't that long ago that his administration was recommending that healthy people not wear masks, so supplies weren't scarce for health care workers and first responders who needed them. Then it was Trump who told people that wearing face coverings and scarves could make a big difference.

So this idea emerging that being seen wearing a mask somehow is a virtue signal for which party you belong to — and some thinking it infringes on their civil liberties or makes them look weak — is just not helpful to stopping the spread of the virus.

Many Republican leaders are saying so, too.

"If someone is wearing a mask, they're not doing it to represent what political party they're in or what candidates they support," North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum, a Republican, said in an emotional statement Friday. His voice started to break and he started to tear up, as he continued, "They might be doing it because they've got a 5-year-old child who's been going through cancer treatments. They might have vulnerable adults in their life, who currently have COVID and they're fighting."

Similarly, Republican Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine said Sunday on NBC's Meet the Press: "This is not about politics. This is not about whether you are liberal or conservative, left or right, Republican or Democrat."

Dr. Stephen Hahn, head of the Food and Drug Administration, tweeted a warning Sunday that "the coronavirus is not yet contained" and he reminded Americans that "social distancing, hand washing and wearing masks protect us all."

Also on Meet The Press, the president's national security adviser, Robert O'Brien, shifted the focus from health to the economy, making the argument to wear a mask this way: "Mask usage is going to help us get this economy reopened."

Maybe that's an argument that will stick with the president, and one — if he's convinced — he can translate to his conservative base, which has grown increasingly more concerned with reopening businesses than the health impact of COVID-19.

But that's a big if.

Three things to watch this week:

1) 100,000 coronavirus deaths: It's a staggering number, but the country is approaching 100,000 deaths attributed to COVID-19. It's something that was seemingly unfathomable two to three months ago. "You have 15 people, and the 15 within a couple of days is going to be down to close to zero," Trump said on Feb. 26. A month later, in late March, he downplayed the deadliness of coronavirus again, saying 36,000 on average die from the flu every year: "So you say to yourself, 'What is this all about?' " At that point, just over 700 Americans had died from COVID-19.

States are reopening, and experts are concerned about potential spikes, especially if people flaunt social distancing restrictions the way some did this weekend.

2) Trump goes to Baltimore, but its mayor doesn't want him there: Trump on Monday will participate in a Memorial Day ceremony at Baltimore's Fort McHenry. But the city's mayor said he doesn't think Trump should come. "We don't need to be spending our resources for the president who's coming here under our orders to stay at home. I think he's violating the law," Mayor Jack Young said last week.

Trump didn't win any friends in Baltimore last year, when he referred to the late Rep. Elijah Cummings' district in Baltimore as "a disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess."

3) Speaking of going places others aren't supposed to...: Trump and Vice President Pence are scheduled to go to a NASA/SpaceX launch in Florida on Wednesday. But on May 1, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine urged Americans to stay away due to coronavirus concerns. "We're asking people not to travel to Kennedy [Space Center], but to watch online or watch on your television at home," he said.

It wouldn't be the first time the president has flouted his own administration's public guidance and declined to set an example. Trump is eager to show a country getting back to normal so he can tout improvement ahead of his reelection bid.
On this Memorial Day weekend, beaches have reopene... (show quote)


While 100,000 is a lot of dead, it is still such a small figure compared to overall population. Oh yes, we social distanced (Guess what, nobody here did, travellers from all over the country here) there have been 3, yes 3 cases in the county which I live (Tourist hot spot). There have been fewer than 100 deaths in the state of Utah. So I'm supposed to conform to the same thing that New York does?? I think not. It is seriously time for you liberals on this board to quit your whining, think for yourselves, and stop trying to push your agenda on everyone else. We shut the country down for 1.8 million cases (.004%).

| Reply
May 25, 2020 11:28:59   #
Capt-jack Loc: Home
 
bestpal38 wrote:
While 100,000 is a lot of dead, it is still such a small figure compared to overall population. Oh yes, we social distanced (Guess what, nobody here did, travellers from all over the country here) there have been 3, yes 3 cases in the county which I live (Tourist hot spot). There have been fewer than 100 deaths in the state of Utah. So I'm supposed to conform to the same thing that New York does?? I think not. It is seriously time for you liberals on this board to quit your whining, think for yourselves, and stop trying to push your agenda on everyone else. We shut the country down for 1.8 million cases (.004%).
While 100,000 is a lot of dead, it is still such a... (show quote)


CV-19 Lib scam.



| Reply
May 25, 2020 11:33:26   #
Kevyn
 
bestpal38 wrote:
While 100,000 is a lot of dead, it is still such a small figure compared to overall population. Oh yes, we social distanced (Guess what, nobody here did, travellers from all over the country here) there have been 3, yes 3 cases in the county which I live (Tourist hot spot). There have been fewer than 100 deaths in the state of Utah. So I'm supposed to conform to the same thing that New York does?? I think not. It is seriously time for you liberals on this board to quit your whining, think for yourselves, and stop trying to push your agenda on everyone else. We shut the country down for 1.8 million cases (.004%).
While 100,000 is a lot of dead, it is still such a... (show quote)


Using your logic, the 9-11 attack was completely inconsequential, after all it only killed 3% as many as those Trump’s bungled plague has killed so far. Only three cases are in your county due to the measures taken and if and when they are relaxed the numbers will take off.

| Reply
May 25, 2020 11:35:56   #
Kevyn
 
GoCubs wrote:
On this Memorial Day weekend, beaches have reopened and people are venturing outside. And images and videos have circulated of some crowded beaches, pools and boardwalks in Maryland, Florida, Missouri, Texas and California.

And many people didn't heed warnings and weren't wearing masks.

It's perhaps not surprising when you consider President Trump — who as president sets the tone for so much of the country, especially for his supporters — has refused to be seen wearing a mask publicly.

"I had one on before," Trump said last week at a Ford Motor Co. plant in Michigan. "I wore one in this back area. I didn't want to give the press the pleasure of seeing it."

The "pleasure" of seeing it? It's odd that, as the country approaches 100,000 deaths from the coronavirus, the president would feel wearing a mask was somehow something the press might mock him for, especially when his own administration's guidelines say to wear one when out in public and within 6 feet of someone.

It's important to remember that Trump is the one who changed the narrative on wearing masks in the first place. It wasn't that long ago that his administration was recommending that healthy people not wear masks, so supplies weren't scarce for health care workers and first responders who needed them. Then it was Trump who told people that wearing face coverings and scarves could make a big difference.

So this idea emerging that being seen wearing a mask somehow is a virtue signal for which party you belong to — and some thinking it infringes on their civil liberties or makes them look weak — is just not helpful to stopping the spread of the virus.

Many Republican leaders are saying so, too.

"If someone is wearing a mask, they're not doing it to represent what political party they're in or what candidates they support," North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum, a Republican, said in an emotional statement Friday. His voice started to break and he started to tear up, as he continued, "They might be doing it because they've got a 5-year-old child who's been going through cancer treatments. They might have vulnerable adults in their life, who currently have COVID and they're fighting."

Similarly, Republican Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine said Sunday on NBC's Meet the Press: "This is not about politics. This is not about whether you are liberal or conservative, left or right, Republican or Democrat."

Dr. Stephen Hahn, head of the Food and Drug Administration, tweeted a warning Sunday that "the coronavirus is not yet contained" and he reminded Americans that "social distancing, hand washing and wearing masks protect us all."

Also on Meet The Press, the president's national security adviser, Robert O'Brien, shifted the focus from health to the economy, making the argument to wear a mask this way: "Mask usage is going to help us get this economy reopened."

Maybe that's an argument that will stick with the president, and one — if he's convinced — he can translate to his conservative base, which has grown increasingly more concerned with reopening businesses than the health impact of COVID-19.

But that's a big if.

Three things to watch this week:

1) 100,000 coronavirus deaths: It's a staggering number, but the country is approaching 100,000 deaths attributed to COVID-19. It's something that was seemingly unfathomable two to three months ago. "You have 15 people, and the 15 within a couple of days is going to be down to close to zero," Trump said on Feb. 26. A month later, in late March, he downplayed the deadliness of coronavirus again, saying 36,000 on average die from the flu every year: "So you say to yourself, 'What is this all about?' " At that point, just over 700 Americans had died from COVID-19.

States are reopening, and experts are concerned about potential spikes, especially if people flaunt social distancing restrictions the way some did this weekend.

2) Trump goes to Baltimore, but its mayor doesn't want him there: Trump on Monday will participate in a Memorial Day ceremony at Baltimore's Fort McHenry. But the city's mayor said he doesn't think Trump should come. "We don't need to be spending our resources for the president who's coming here under our orders to stay at home. I think he's violating the law," Mayor Jack Young said last week.

Trump didn't win any friends in Baltimore last year, when he referred to the late Rep. Elijah Cummings' district in Baltimore as "a disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess."

3) Speaking of going places others aren't supposed to...: Trump and Vice President Pence are scheduled to go to a NASA/SpaceX launch in Florida on Wednesday. But on May 1, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine urged Americans to stay away due to coronavirus concerns. "We're asking people not to travel to Kennedy [Space Center], but to watch online or watch on your television at home," he said.

It wouldn't be the first time the president has flouted his own administration's public guidance and declined to set an example. Trump is eager to show a country getting back to normal so he can tout improvement ahead of his reelection bid.
On this Memorial Day weekend, beaches have reopene... (show quote)

All they need to do to get Trump to wear a mask is tell him they are a pair of Ivanka’s panties.

| Reply
May 25, 2020 11:43:35   #
Kevyn
 
Capt-jack wrote:
CV-19 Lib scam.


Hey Capt-jackoff, here is how to test your underwear theory. Walk across the room in front of your wife or significant other while breaking wind. The next time you need to pass gas remove your pants and underwear stand closer than 6 feet aim your arse her way and let it rip. Now you can measure her reaction to both to determine if the pants and underwear reduced her exposure. You see the masks do not entirely filter the virus they simply mitigate its spread as do distancing, frequent hand washing not touching your face and other basic hygiene techniques.

| Reply
May 25, 2020 12:12:11   #
Capt-jack Loc: Home
 
Kevyn wrote:
Hey Capt-jackoff, here is how to test your underwear theory. Walk across the room in front of your wife or significant other while breaking wind. The next time you need to pass gas remove your pants and underwear stand closer than 6 feet aim your arse her way and let it rip. Now you can measure her reaction to both to determine if the pants and underwear reduced her exposure. You see the masks do not entirely filter the virus they simply mitigate its spread as do distancing, frequent hand washing not touching your face and other basic hygiene techniques.
Hey Capt-jackoff, here is how to test your underwe... (show quote)


I assume you have tested this out yourself, lol lol lol lol.

| Reply
May 25, 2020 12:17:16   #
Kevyn
 
Capt-jack wrote:
I assume you have tested this out yourself, lol lol lol lol.

This is not an experiment without risk, you should consider wearing a helmet.

| Reply
May 25, 2020 12:24:10   #
Capt-jack Loc: Home
 
Kevyn wrote:
This is not an experiment without risk, you should consider wearing a helmet.


Since you failed science and dropped out of school, you are not aware that any and all viruses are just a bit bigger than an ATOM. They can pass through almost anything, even your skin.
Wearing a mask makes you breathe lots of CO2, the stuff you lefties are always crying about.

So which Commie party do you belong to?

| Reply
May 25, 2020 12:32:57   #
woodguru
 
GoCubs wrote:
On this Memorial Day weekend, beaches have reopened and people are venturing outside. And images and videos have circulated of some crowded beaches, pools and boardwalks in Maryland, Florida, Missouri, Texas and California.

And many people didn't heed warnings and weren't wearing masks.

It's perhaps not surprising when you consider President Trump — who as president sets the tone for so much of the country, especially for his supporters — has refused to be seen wearing a mask publicly.

"I had one on before," Trump said last week at a Ford Motor Co. plant in Michigan. "I wore one in this back area. I didn't want to give the press the pleasure of seeing it."

The "pleasure" of seeing it? It's odd that, as the country approaches 100,000 deaths from the coronavirus, the president would feel wearing a mask was somehow something the press might mock him for, especially when his own administration's guidelines say to wear one when out in public and within 6 feet of someone.

It's important to remember that Trump is the one who changed the narrative on wearing masks in the first place. It wasn't that long ago that his administration was recommending that healthy people not wear masks, so supplies weren't scarce for health care workers and first responders who needed them. Then it was Trump who told people that wearing face coverings and scarves could make a big difference.

So this idea emerging that being seen wearing a mask somehow is a virtue signal for which party you belong to — and some thinking it infringes on their civil liberties or makes them look weak — is just not helpful to stopping the spread of the virus.

Many Republican leaders are saying so, too.

"If someone is wearing a mask, they're not doing it to represent what political party they're in or what candidates they support," North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum, a Republican, said in an emotional statement Friday. His voice started to break and he started to tear up, as he continued, "They might be doing it because they've got a 5-year-old child who's been going through cancer treatments. They might have vulnerable adults in their life, who currently have COVID and they're fighting."

Similarly, Republican Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine said Sunday on NBC's Meet the Press: "This is not about politics. This is not about whether you are liberal or conservative, left or right, Republican or Democrat."

Dr. Stephen Hahn, head of the Food and Drug Administration, tweeted a warning Sunday that "the coronavirus is not yet contained" and he reminded Americans that "social distancing, hand washing and wearing masks protect us all."

Also on Meet The Press, the president's national security adviser, Robert O'Brien, shifted the focus from health to the economy, making the argument to wear a mask this way: "Mask usage is going to help us get this economy reopened."

Maybe that's an argument that will stick with the president, and one — if he's convinced — he can translate to his conservative base, which has grown increasingly more concerned with reopening businesses than the health impact of COVID-19.

But that's a big if.

Three things to watch this week:

1) 100,000 coronavirus deaths: It's a staggering number, but the country is approaching 100,000 deaths attributed to COVID-19. It's something that was seemingly unfathomable two to three months ago. "You have 15 people, and the 15 within a couple of days is going to be down to close to zero," Trump said on Feb. 26. A month later, in late March, he downplayed the deadliness of coronavirus again, saying 36,000 on average die from the flu every year: "So you say to yourself, 'What is this all about?' " At that point, just over 700 Americans had died from COVID-19.

States are reopening, and experts are concerned about potential spikes, especially if people flaunt social distancing restrictions the way some did this weekend.

2) Trump goes to Baltimore, but its mayor doesn't want him there: Trump on Monday will participate in a Memorial Day ceremony at Baltimore's Fort McHenry. But the city's mayor said he doesn't think Trump should come. "We don't need to be spending our resources for the president who's coming here under our orders to stay at home. I think he's violating the law," Mayor Jack Young said last week.

Trump didn't win any friends in Baltimore last year, when he referred to the late Rep. Elijah Cummings' district in Baltimore as "a disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess."

3) Speaking of going places others aren't supposed to...: Trump and Vice President Pence are scheduled to go to a NASA/SpaceX launch in Florida on Wednesday. But on May 1, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine urged Americans to stay away due to coronavirus concerns. "We're asking people not to travel to Kennedy [Space Center], but to watch online or watch on your television at home," he said.

It wouldn't be the first time the president has flouted his own administration's public guidance and declined to set an example. Trump is eager to show a country getting back to normal so he can tout improvement ahead of his reelection bid.
On this Memorial Day weekend, beaches have reopene... (show quote)


Actually had the press seen him wear a mask they would have been quite complimentary...the right such as Limbaugh probably would have denigrated him as being a pansy, but not the left

| Reply
May 25, 2020 12:36:43   #
JFlorio Loc: Seminole Florida
 
GoCubs wrote:
On this Memorial Day weekend, beaches have reopened and people are venturing outside. And images and videos have circulated of some crowded beaches, pools and boardwalks in Maryland, Florida, Missouri, Texas and California.

And many people didn't heed warnings and weren't wearing masks.

It's perhaps not surprising when you consider President Trump — who as president sets the tone for so much of the country, especially for his supporters — has refused to be seen wearing a mask publicly.

"I had one on before," Trump said last week at a Ford Motor Co. plant in Michigan. "I wore one in this back area. I didn't want to give the press the pleasure of seeing it."

The "pleasure" of seeing it? It's odd that, as the country approaches 100,000 deaths from the coronavirus, the president would feel wearing a mask was somehow something the press might mock him for, especially when his own administration's guidelines say to wear one when out in public and within 6 feet of someone.

It's important to remember that Trump is the one who changed the narrative on wearing masks in the first place. It wasn't that long ago that his administration was recommending that healthy people not wear masks, so supplies weren't scarce for health care workers and first responders who needed them. Then it was Trump who told people that wearing face coverings and scarves could make a big difference.

So this idea emerging that being seen wearing a mask somehow is a virtue signal for which party you belong to — and some thinking it infringes on their civil liberties or makes them look weak — is just not helpful to stopping the spread of the virus.

Many Republican leaders are saying so, too.

"If someone is wearing a mask, they're not doing it to represent what political party they're in or what candidates they support," North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum, a Republican, said in an emotional statement Friday. His voice started to break and he started to tear up, as he continued, "They might be doing it because they've got a 5-year-old child who's been going through cancer treatments. They might have vulnerable adults in their life, who currently have COVID and they're fighting."

Similarly, Republican Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine said Sunday on NBC's Meet the Press: "This is not about politics. This is not about whether you are liberal or conservative, left or right, Republican or Democrat."

Dr. Stephen Hahn, head of the Food and Drug Administration, tweeted a warning Sunday that "the coronavirus is not yet contained" and he reminded Americans that "social distancing, hand washing and wearing masks protect us all."

Also on Meet The Press, the president's national security adviser, Robert O'Brien, shifted the focus from health to the economy, making the argument to wear a mask this way: "Mask usage is going to help us get this economy reopened."

Maybe that's an argument that will stick with the president, and one — if he's convinced — he can translate to his conservative base, which has grown increasingly more concerned with reopening businesses than the health impact of COVID-19.

But that's a big if.

Three things to watch this week:

1) 100,000 coronavirus deaths: It's a staggering number, but the country is approaching 100,000 deaths attributed to COVID-19. It's something that was seemingly unfathomable two to three months ago. "You have 15 people, and the 15 within a couple of days is going to be down to close to zero," Trump said on Feb. 26. A month later, in late March, he downplayed the deadliness of coronavirus again, saying 36,000 on average die from the flu every year: "So you say to yourself, 'What is this all about?' " At that point, just over 700 Americans had died from COVID-19.

States are reopening, and experts are concerned about potential spikes, especially if people flaunt social distancing restrictions the way some did this weekend.

2) Trump goes to Baltimore, but its mayor doesn't want him there: Trump on Monday will participate in a Memorial Day ceremony at Baltimore's Fort McHenry. But the city's mayor said he doesn't think Trump should come. "We don't need to be spending our resources for the president who's coming here under our orders to stay at home. I think he's violating the law," Mayor Jack Young said last week.

Trump didn't win any friends in Baltimore last year, when he referred to the late Rep. Elijah Cummings' district in Baltimore as "a disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess."

3) Speaking of going places others aren't supposed to...: Trump and Vice President Pence are scheduled to go to a NASA/SpaceX launch in Florida on Wednesday. But on May 1, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine urged Americans to stay away due to coronavirus concerns. "We're asking people not to travel to Kennedy [Space Center], but to watch online or watch on your television at home," he said.

It wouldn't be the first time the president has flouted his own administration's public guidance and declined to set an example. Trump is eager to show a country getting back to normal so he can tout improvement ahead of his reelection bid.
On this Memorial Day weekend, beaches have reopene... (show quote)


Not so staggering in the great scheme of things. In 1969 we had 100,000 deaths from a flu strain. The population of the U.S. was 202.7 million. No lockdown, no panic, no masks, and above all no ruined economy. Now our population is 331 million. We are approaching 100,000 deaths. The question not being asked is why did the flu in 1969 quit killing so many people? They don't ask, because we know. They didn't lock themselves away and pray for a vaccine. The survivors which were over 99% survived because of "herd immunity". It is, unfortunately what will beat this virus if it can be beaten. The vulnerable use common sense and the rest go about their lives. Yes, some will certainly die. Kinda inevitable. We all die from something. The idea was always to keep the healthcare system from being overwhelmed. That we have done. Don't forget the esteemed Fauci has changed his opinion on this virus and how to best move forward many times.

| Reply
May 25, 2020 12:41:48   #
JFlorio Loc: Seminole Florida
 
Kevyn wrote:
Using your logic, the 9-11 attack was completely inconsequential, after all it only killed 3% as many as those Trump’s bungled plague has killed so far. Only three cases are in your county due to the measures taken and if and when they are relaxed the numbers will take off.


3%? 3% of all Americans? Try about .00136% of Americans.

| Reply
May 25, 2020 12:59:11   #
Kevyn
 
JFlorio wrote:
3%? 3% of all Americans? Try about .00136% of Americans.


Read the post again, it clearly states that the 9-11 attacks killed 3% The number of the hundred thousand that Trumps plague has to date.

| Reply
May 25, 2020 13:16:12   #
JFlorio Loc: Seminole Florida
 
Kevyn wrote:
Read the post again, it clearly states that the 9-11 attacks killed 3% The number of the hundred thousand that Trumps plague has to date.


3% of what? O.K.. Read it, got it. the analogy is so stupid I didn't get the gist since Trump didn't kill anyone. Now Cuomo is a different story. Why don't you grow up or go back to mother Russia.

| Reply
May 26, 2020 09:37:11   #
Capt-jack Loc: Home
 
Kevyn wrote:
Using your logic, the 9-11 attack was completely inconsequential, after all it only killed 3% as many as those Trump’s bungled plague has killed so far. Only three cases are in your county due to the measures taken and if and when they are relaxed the numbers will take off.


My logic is right, now yours is twisted badly. White is not black but to you it is.

| Reply
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