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Is this a sign of an idiot liar?
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Feb 12, 2020 11:12:25   #
American Vet
 
padremike wrote:
The first known example of an opinion poll was a local straw poll conducted by The Harrisburg Pennsylvanian in 1824, showing Andrew Jackson leading John Quincy Adams by 335 votes to 169 in the contest for the United States Presidency.


Hey!! You need to learn the rules around here. No fair to throw facts into Kevyboy's rants.....

| Reply
Feb 12, 2020 11:17:08   #
nwtk2007
 
Kazudy wrote:
Kevin, if you don’t understand hyperbolic talk when you hear it, explains why you seem such a low information person. I am willing to bet that when President Trump said during his debate with Hillary”hey Russia send us Hillary’s emails” you thought that Trump was really asking for the emails. It seems that you Hillary losers just can’t get over the fact that madam Benghazi lost. Get over it or you’ll be miserable the next for years.


Good point kazudy. I have made the same point before. The democrats actually claim Trumps "request to Russia" is evidence of collusion.

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Feb 12, 2020 12:20:14   #
padremike Loc: Phenix City, Al
 
American Vet wrote:
Hey!! You need to learn the rules around here. No fair to throw facts into Kevyboy's rants.....


I feel so guilty and soiled since you've brought this to my attention. 😂

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Feb 12, 2020 12:31:54   #
Boo_Boo Loc: Jellystone
 
Kevyn wrote:
Or does he have such a low opinion of his cult members he figures they don’t have the brights to know he is lying? Trump tweeted that his poll numbers were greater than Abraham Lincoln ignoring that polls weren’t taken until the 20th century decades after Lincoln’s death. So is he stupid and a liar or does he bank on his supporters ignorance? My money is on both, he is a morons lying moron.


it is quite possible that President Trump has maintained, even when polls ranked him in the 30s, was more popular than Lincoln. Lincoln was only popular with Yankees, primarily because his word to Southerners was worthless! indeed, Salem Advocate (newspaper printed in Lincoln's home ground of central Illinois) had a harsh opinion; "The illustrious Honest Old Abe has continued during the last week to make a fool of himself and to mortify and shame the intelligent people of this great nation. His speeches have demonstrated the fact that although originally a Herculean rail splitter and more lately a whimsical story teller and side splitter, he is no more capable of becoming a statesman, nay, even a moderate one, than the braying ass can become a noble lion. People now marvel how it came to pass that Mr. Lincoln should have been selected as the representative man of any party. His weak, wishy-washy, namby-pamby efforts, imbecile in matter, disgusting in manner, have made us the laughing stock of the whole world. The European powers will despise us because we have no better material out of which to make a President. The truth is, Lincoln is only a moderate lawyer and in the larger cities of the Union could pass for no more than a facetious pettifogger."

The author of that "insightful" article was not alone: Vanity Fair, "By the advice of weak men, who should straddle through life in petticoats instead of disgracing such manly garments as pantaloons and coats, the President-elect disguises himself after the manner of heroes in two-shilling novels, and rides secretly, in the deep night, from Harrisburg to Washington." The Brooklyn Eagle, in a column titled "Mr. Lincoln's Flight by Moonlight Alone," suggested the president deserved "the deepest disgrace that the crushing indignation of a whole people can inflict." The New York Tribune joked darkly, "Mr. Lincoln may live a hundred years without having so good a chance to die."

So, how popular was he? Lincoln won the 1860 election in November with 39.8 percent of the popular vote. This absurdly low total was partly due to the fact that four candidates were on the ballot, but it remains the poorest showing by any winning presidential candidate in American history.

At the time he was sworn in, Lincoln's "approval rating" can be estimated by examining wintertime Republican losses in local elections in Brooklyn, Cincinnati, Cleveland and St. Louis, and state elections in Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island; by the observations of Henry Adams (of the presidential Adams) that "not a third of the House" supported him; and by the published reckoning of the New York Herald that only 1 million of the 4.7 million who voted in November were still with him. All these indications put his support in the nation at about 25 percent — roughly equivalent to the lowest approval ratings recorded by modern-day polling.

To the opinion makers in the cities of the East, he was a weakling, inadequate to the needs of the democracy. To the hostile masses in the South, he was an interloper, a Caesar who represented a deadly threat to the young republic. To millions on both sides of the Mason-Dixon line, he was not a statesman but merely a standard bearer for a vast, corrupt political system.

Truth be known, Lincoln was not a great, or even a "good" president.

So, tell me again how our President lied.

| Reply
Feb 12, 2020 12:40:30   #
nwtk2007
 
Pennylynn wrote:
it is quite possible that President Trump has maintained, even when polls ranked him in the 30s, was more popular than Lincoln. Lincoln was only popular with Yankees, primarily because his word to Southerners was worthless! indeed, Salem Advocate (newspaper printed in Lincoln's home ground of central Illinois) had a harsh opinion; "The illustrious Honest Old Abe has continued during the last week to make a fool of himself and to mortify and shame the intelligent people of this great nation. His speeches have demonstrated the fact that although originally a Herculean rail splitter and more lately a whimsical story teller and side splitter, he is no more capable of becoming a statesman, nay, even a moderate one, than the braying ass can become a noble lion. People now marvel how it came to pass that Mr. Lincoln should have been selected as the representative man of any party. His weak, wishy-washy, namby-pamby efforts, imbecile in matter, disgusting in manner, have made us the laughing stock of the whole world. The European powers will despise us because we have no better material out of which to make a President. The truth is, Lincoln is only a moderate lawyer and in the larger cities of the Union could pass for no more than a facetious pettifogger."

The author of that "insightful" article was not alone: Vanity Fair, "By the advice of weak men, who should straddle through life in petticoats instead of disgracing such manly garments as pantaloons and coats, the President-elect disguises himself after the manner of heroes in two-shilling novels, and rides secretly, in the deep night, from Harrisburg to Washington." The Brooklyn Eagle, in a column titled "Mr. Lincoln's Flight by Moonlight Alone," suggested the president deserved "the deepest disgrace that the crushing indignation of a whole people can inflict." The New York Tribune joked darkly, "Mr. Lincoln may live a hundred years without having so good a chance to die."

So, how popular was he? Lincoln won the 1860 election in November with 39.8 percent of the popular vote. This absurdly low total was partly due to the fact that four candidates were on the ballot, but it remains the poorest showing by any winning presidential candidate in American history.

At the time he was sworn in, Lincoln's "approval rating" can be estimated by examining wintertime Republican losses in local elections in Brooklyn, Cincinnati, Cleveland and St. Louis, and state elections in Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island; by the observations of Henry Adams (of the presidential Adams) that "not a third of the House" supported him; and by the published reckoning of the New York Herald that only 1 million of the 4.7 million who voted in November were still with him. All these indications put his support in the nation at about 25 percent — roughly equivalent to the lowest approval ratings recorded by modern-day polling.

To the opinion makers in the cities of the East, he was a weakling, inadequate to the needs of the democracy. To the hostile masses in the South, he was an interloper, a Caesar who represented a deadly threat to the young republic. To millions on both sides of the Mason-Dixon line, he was not a statesman but merely a standard bearer for a vast, corrupt political system.

Truth be known, Lincoln was not a great, or even a "good" president.

So, tell me again how our President lied.
it is quite possible that President Trump has main... (show quote)


A very interesting comment!

| Reply
Feb 12, 2020 12:42:01   #
American Vet
 
Pennylynn wrote:
it is quite possible that President Trump has maintained, even when polls ranked him in the 30s, was more popular than Lincoln. Lincoln was only popular with Yankees, primarily because his word to Southerners was worthless! indeed, Salem Advocate (newspaper printed in Lincoln's home ground of central Illinois) had a harsh opinion; "The illustrious Honest Old Abe has continued during the last week to make a fool of himself and to mortify and shame the intelligent people of this great nation. His speeches have demonstrated the fact that although originally a Herculean rail splitter and more lately a whimsical story teller and side splitter, he is no more capable of becoming a statesman, nay, even a moderate one, than the braying ass can become a noble lion. People now marvel how it came to pass that Mr. Lincoln should have been selected as the representative man of any party. His weak, wishy-washy, namby-pamby efforts, imbecile in matter, disgusting in manner, have made us the laughing stock of the whole world. The European powers will despise us because we have no better material out of which to make a President. The truth is, Lincoln is only a moderate lawyer and in the larger cities of the Union could pass for no more than a facetious pettifogger."

The author of that "insightful" article was not alone: Vanity Fair, "By the advice of weak men, who should straddle through life in petticoats instead of disgracing such manly garments as pantaloons and coats, the President-elect disguises himself after the manner of heroes in two-shilling novels, and rides secretly, in the deep night, from Harrisburg to Washington." The Brooklyn Eagle, in a column titled "Mr. Lincoln's Flight by Moonlight Alone," suggested the president deserved "the deepest disgrace that the crushing indignation of a whole people can inflict." The New York Tribune joked darkly, "Mr. Lincoln may live a hundred years without having so good a chance to die."

So, how popular was he? Lincoln won the 1860 election in November with 39.8 percent of the popular vote. This absurdly low total was partly due to the fact that four candidates were on the ballot, but it remains the poorest showing by any winning presidential candidate in American history.

At the time he was sworn in, Lincoln's "approval rating" can be estimated by examining wintertime Republican losses in local elections in Brooklyn, Cincinnati, Cleveland and St. Louis, and state elections in Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island; by the observations of Henry Adams (of the presidential Adams) that "not a third of the House" supported him; and by the published reckoning of the New York Herald that only 1 million of the 4.7 million who voted in November were still with him. All these indications put his support in the nation at about 25 percent — roughly equivalent to the lowest approval ratings recorded by modern-day polling.

To the opinion makers in the cities of the East, he was a weakling, inadequate to the needs of the democracy. To the hostile masses in the South, he was an interloper, a Caesar who represented a deadly threat to the young republic. To millions on both sides of the Mason-Dixon line, he was not a statesman but merely a standard bearer for a vast, corrupt political system.

Truth be known, Lincoln was not a great, or even a "good" president.

So, tell me again how our President lied.
it is quite possible that President Trump has main... (show quote)


Good info - gotta love history!

| Reply
Feb 12, 2020 13:09:15   #
vernon
 
Kevyn wrote:
No I don’t swing that way, it must have been someone else’s flopper you were choking on at the truck stop men’s room glory hole.


Well he knows all about thing like that.

| Reply
Feb 12, 2020 13:23:13   #
Weewillynobeerspilly Loc: North central Texas
 
Kevyn wrote:
No I don’t swing that way, it must have been someone else’s flopper you were choking on at the truck stop men’s room glory hole.




Yea you do, like a broken screen door.

someone else's flopper? sounds like an admission to being there, and a touch of jilted lover mixed in.

Yea, you more than swing that way.

| Reply
Feb 12, 2020 13:58:51   #
Boo_Boo Loc: Jellystone
 
nwtk2007 wrote:
A very interesting comment!


All supported by news articles and diaries written during the time of his presidency. Did you also know that he was addicted to a medication which was based on mercury?

I am no fan of Lincoln or Buchannan, IMO both were at best "poor" presidents who rate 2 and 3 on my list of real bad presidents for our nation. You can probably guess who takes the number 1 place.

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Feb 12, 2020 14:00:51   #
Boo_Boo Loc: Jellystone
 
American Vet wrote:
Good info - gotta love history!


Thank you!

All documented..... My husband was a student of history and that love was infectious...

| Reply
Feb 12, 2020 14:06:03   #
nwtk2007
 
Pennylynn wrote:
All supported by news articles and diaries written during the time of his presidency. Did you also know that he was addicted to a medication which was based on mercury?

I am no fan of Lincoln or Buchannan, IMO both were at best "poor" presidents who rate 2 and 3 on my list of real bad presidents for our nation. You can probably guess who takes the number 1 place.


Yes, I'll bet I can!

| Reply
Feb 12, 2020 14:40:04   #
DASHY
 
Pennylynn wrote:
All supported by news articles and diaries written during the time of his presidency. Did you also know that he was addicted to a medication which was based on mercury?

I am no fan of Lincoln or Buchannan, IMO both were at best "poor" presidents who rate 2 and 3 on my list of real bad presidents for our nation. You can probably guess who takes the number 1 place.


Number 1of the real bad presidents must be our current one, Donald Jerk Trump.

| Reply
Feb 12, 2020 15:01:51   #
4430 Loc: Little Egypt ** Southern Illinory
 
DASHY wrote:
Number 1of the real bad presidents must be our current one, Donald Jerk Trump.


Losers Can't stand a winner can ya

| Reply
Feb 12, 2020 15:06:06   #
Boo_Boo Loc: Jellystone
 
DASHY wrote:
Number 1of the real bad presidents must be our current one, Donald Jerk Trump.


Actually no. Although President Trump is a mortal with flaws, there is no doubt that he works hard for all US citizens, has kept (as many as the House will allow) his promises. I do not always agree with his tweets, but I admit that he is often right. History will not view him badly for what he has done as the president.

| Reply
Feb 12, 2020 15:09:24   #
padremike Loc: Phenix City, Al
 
Pennylynn wrote:
it is quite possible that President Trump has maintained, even when polls ranked him in the 30s, was more popular than Lincoln. Lincoln was only popular with Yankees, primarily because his word to Southerners was worthless! indeed, Salem Advocate (newspaper printed in Lincoln's home ground of central Illinois) had a harsh opinion; "The illustrious Honest Old Abe has continued during the last week to make a fool of himself and to mortify and shame the intelligent people of this great nation. His speeches have demonstrated the fact that although originally a Herculean rail splitter and more lately a whimsical story teller and side splitter, he is no more capable of becoming a statesman, nay, even a moderate one, than the braying ass can become a noble lion. People now marvel how it came to pass that Mr. Lincoln should have been selected as the representative man of any party. His weak, wishy-washy, namby-pamby efforts, imbecile in matter, disgusting in manner, have made us the laughing stock of the whole world. The European powers will despise us because we have no better material out of which to make a President. The truth is, Lincoln is only a moderate lawyer and in the larger cities of the Union could pass for no more than a facetious pettifogger."

The author of that "insightful" article was not alone: Vanity Fair, "By the advice of weak men, who should straddle through life in petticoats instead of disgracing such manly garments as pantaloons and coats, the President-elect disguises himself after the manner of heroes in two-shilling novels, and rides secretly, in the deep night, from Harrisburg to Washington." The Brooklyn Eagle, in a column titled "Mr. Lincoln's Flight by Moonlight Alone," suggested the president deserved "the deepest disgrace that the crushing indignation of a whole people can inflict." The New York Tribune joked darkly, "Mr. Lincoln may live a hundred years without having so good a chance to die."

So, how popular was he? Lincoln won the 1860 election in November with 39.8 percent of the popular vote. This absurdly low total was partly due to the fact that four candidates were on the ballot, but it remains the poorest showing by any winning presidential candidate in American history.

At the time he was sworn in, Lincoln's "approval rating" can be estimated by examining wintertime Republican losses in local elections in Brooklyn, Cincinnati, Cleveland and St. Louis, and state elections in Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island; by the observations of Henry Adams (of the presidential Adams) that "not a third of the House" supported him; and by the published reckoning of the New York Herald that only 1 million of the 4.7 million who voted in November were still with him. All these indications put his support in the nation at about 25 percent — roughly equivalent to the lowest approval ratings recorded by modern-day polling.

To the opinion makers in the cities of the East, he was a weakling, inadequate to the needs of the democracy. To the hostile masses in the South, he was an interloper, a Caesar who represented a deadly threat to the young republic. To millions on both sides of the Mason-Dixon line, he was not a statesman but merely a standard bearer for a vast, corrupt political system.

Truth be known, Lincoln was not a great, or even a "good" president.

So, tell me again how our President lied.
it is quite possible that President Trump has main... (show quote)


You are so good. You and Blade, Zemirah and others provide us with knowledge and thoughts that makes me wonder if I've been sleeping most of my life. I hope my ignorance is because I focused too late on things that were deteriorating under my nose. No longer.

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