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Prove All Things
Jan 15, 2020 05:00:03   #
Zemirah Loc: Sojourner En Route...
 
Jesus Christ's intention for every Christian is that they are to prove all things by the Word of God, all churches, all ministers, bishops, deacons and elders, all teaching, all preaching, all doctrines, all sermons, all writings, all opinions, all practices. These are His marching orders:

Prove all by the Word of God (1 Thessalonians 5:21); measure all by the measure of the Bible; compare all with the standard of the Bible; weigh all in the balances of the Bible; examine all by the light of the Bible; test all in the crucible of the Bible.

That which can abide the fire of the Bible, receive, hold, believe, and obey. That which cannot abide the fire of the Bible, reject, refuse, repudiate, and cast away.

John Wycliffe: Prove all things of God through the Scriptures

John Wycliffe was one of those individuals who seem to have been born before their time. A brilliant and courageous cleric and scholar, Wycliffe is mainly remembered for producing the first Bible in English, - the inspiration and figurehead for that dangerous and secretive undertaking. Mystery still surrounds the sudden appearance of numerous hand-copied Bibles among a population who previously had been held in scriptural illiteracy by a church jealous of its influence, power, wealth and privileges.

This is the standard which John Wycliffe raised in England.
This is the flag which he nailed to the mast. May it never be lowered.

Born:c. 1328, Hipswell, Yorkshire, England
Died:Dec 31, 1384, Lutterworth, Leicestershire, England
Alma Mater: Merton College, Oxford

(c. 1320s – 31 December 1384, English scholastic philosopher, theologian, priest, biblical translator, reformer, minister, and professor at the University of Oxford. He was an early influential dissident within the priesthood, an ardent defender of the practices set forth in Scripture, and is considered an important predecessor to the Reformation.

John Wycliffe's ideology was often concerned with church reform. In a series of political-ecclesiastical treatises, Wycliffe expounded his view that the church of his day should return to evangelical poverty. Later he began a systematic attack on its non-biblical beliefs and practices, which included condemnation of every doctrine men had added to the church of Jesus Christ that was unknown to the Apostles.

Wycliffe attacked the privileged status of the clergy, which had bolstered their powerful role in England. He then attacked the luxury and pomp of local parishes and their elaborate ceremonies. Most important to his legacy, Wycliffe also advocated the translation of the Bible into the common language.

Noting that the Bible said the gospel was to be given freely, Wycliffe attacked the money-grabbing and impoverishing practices of the medieval church. Decrying the feudal power of the church, he held that each person was directly responsible to God.

John Wycliffe produced some of the first handwritten English translations of the Bible and helped to make them widely available to all men as God intended, rather than just to the church leadership.

Decades after his death, Wycliffe and his teachings were still perceived to be a threat by the church at Rome. Because he had escaped the prescribed punishment for heresy while alive, he was tried a second time in 1415 and this time condemned, although long since dead.

The Council of Constance ordered that his body be disinterred and burned. Pope Martin V approved the order, and the deed was carried out in 1428, approximately 44 years after Wycliffe’s death. His bones were burned in a field of execution and the ashes scattered in the River Swift near Lutterworth.

Yet does John Wycliffe's spirit reside at the throne of God today, for Scripture tells all believers (2nd Corinthians 5:6, 5:8) that to be absent from the body is to be present with their Lord.

Wycliffe’s influence proved harder to destroy than his mortal remains, however. The Word of God had been savored by many English people and, in spite of a grim century of suppression that was to follow, the stage had been set for the great work of translation from the original languages that would be undertaken by William Tyndale.

Today, the Tyndale Center for Bible Translation provides training in Bible translation at The Master’s Seminary within the context of the Master of Divinity program. Outside the classroom, the center seeks to raise awareness of the pressing need for translation and to serve as a resource for the global church.

The greatest need now is for Scripture in the over 1,636 languages without a Bible yet written in their own language. Another 2,584 languages have some work in progress, but still are waiting for a finished translation of God's Word.

"And this good news of the kingdom will be given through all the world for a witness to all nations; and then the end will come." (Matthew 24:14)

To prove all things of God, is to be able to read the Bible, and to find and confirm the truth for yourself in the Scriptures. You will find contentment, and eternal life, through Jesus Christ, for it is He of whom the Scriptures speak.

| Reply
Jan 15, 2020 05:41:26   #
Canuckus Deploracus Loc: North of the wall
 
Zemirah wrote:
Jesus Christ's intention for every Christian is that they are to prove all things by the Word of God, all churches, all ministers, bishops, deacons and elders, all teaching, all preaching, all doctrines, all sermons, all writings, all opinions, all practices. These are His marching orders:

Prove all by the Word of God (1 Thessalonians 5:21); measure all by the measure of the Bible; compare all with the standard of the Bible; weigh all in the balances of the Bible; examine all by the light of the Bible; test all in the crucible of the Bible.

That which can abide the fire of the Bible, receive, hold, believe, and obey. That which cannot abide the fire of the Bible, reject, refuse, repudiate, and cast away.

John Wycliffe: Prove all things of God through the Scriptures

John Wycliffe was one of those individuals who seem to have been born before their time. A brilliant and courageous cleric and scholar, Wycliffe is mainly remembered for producing the first Bible in English, - the inspiration and figurehead for that dangerous and secretive undertaking. Mystery still surrounds the sudden appearance of numerous hand-copied Bibles among a population who previously had been held in scriptural illiteracy by a church jealous of its influence, power, wealth and privileges.

This is the standard which John Wycliffe raised in England.
This is the flag which he nailed to the mast. May it never be lowered.

Born:c. 1328, Hipswell, Yorkshire, England
Died:Dec 31, 1384, Lutterworth, Leicestershire, England
Alma Mater: Merton College, Oxford

(c. 1320s – 31 December 1384, English scholastic philosopher, theologian, priest, biblical translator, reformer, minister, and professor at the University of Oxford. He was an early influential dissident within the priesthood, an ardent defender of the practices set forth in Scripture, and is considered an important predecessor to the Reformation.

John Wycliffe's ideology was often concerned with church reform. In a series of political-ecclesiastical treatises, Wycliffe expounded his view that the church of his day should return to evangelical poverty. Later he began a systematic attack on its non-biblical beliefs and practices, which included condemnation of every doctrine men had added to the church of Jesus Christ that was unknown to the Apostles.

Wycliffe attacked the privileged status of the clergy, which had bolstered their powerful role in England. He then attacked the luxury and pomp of local parishes and their elaborate ceremonies. Most important to his legacy, Wycliffe also advocated the translation of the Bible into the common language.

Noting that the Bible said the gospel was to be given freely, Wycliffe attacked the money-grabbing and impoverishing practices of the medieval church. Decrying the feudal power of the church, he held that each person was directly responsible to God.

John Wycliffe produced some of the first handwritten English translations of the Bible and helped to make them widely available to all men as God intended, rather than just to the church leadership.

Decades after his death, Wycliffe and his teachings were still perceived to be a threat by the church at Rome. Because he had escaped the prescribed punishment for heresy while alive, he was tried a second time in 1415 and this time condemned, although long since dead.

The Council of Constance ordered that his body be disinterred and burned. Pope Martin V approved the order, and the deed was carried out in 1428, approximately 44 years after Wycliffe’s death. His bones were burned in a field of execution and the ashes scattered in the River Swift near Lutterworth.

Yet does John Wycliffe's spirit reside at the throne of God today, for Scripture tells all believers (2nd Corinthians 5:6, 5:8) that to be absent from the body is to be present with their Lord.

Wycliffe’s influence proved harder to destroy than his mortal remains, however. The Word of God had been savored by many English people and, in spite of a grim century of suppression that was to follow, the stage had been set for the great work of translation from the original languages that would be undertaken by William Tyndale.

Today, the Tyndale Center for Bible Translation provides training in Bible translation at The Master’s Seminary within the context of the Master of Divinity program. Outside the classroom, the center seeks to raise awareness of the pressing need for translation and to serve as a resource for the global church.

The greatest need now is for Scripture in the over 1,636 languages without a Bible yet written in their own language. Another 2,584 languages have some work in progress, but still are waiting for a finished translation of God's Word.

"And this good news of the kingdom will be given through all the world for a witness to all nations; and then the end will come." (Matthew 24:14)

To prove all things of God, is to be able to read the Bible, and to find and confirm the truth for yourself in the Scriptures. You will find contentment, and eternal life, through Jesus Christ, for it is He of whom the Scriptures speak.
Jesus Christ's intention for every Christian is th... (show quote)


Goos read..

I was just thinking that the FSR section has been rather quiet lately...


| Reply
Jan 15, 2020 16:10:21   #
Fodaoson Loc: South Texas
 
Some people misread the Bible and misquote it., In the study of Biblical theology there are two opposing methods of interpretation, Exegesis and Eisegesis. Eisegesis (/ˌaɪsɪˈdʒiːsɪs/) is the process of interpreting text in such a way as to introduce one's own presuppositions, agendas or biases. ... Exegesis is drawing out text's meaning in accordance with the author's context and discoverable meaning. Eisegesis is when a reader imposes their interpretation of the text. Theological scholars have long been preoccupied with interpreting the meanings of various passages in the Bible. English speakers have used the word exegesis - a descendant of the Greek term exegeisthai, meaning "to explain" or "to interpret" - to refer to explanations of Scripture since the early 17th century. In biblical exegesis, the opposite of exegesis (to draw out) is eisegesis (to draw in), in the sense of an eisegetic commentator "importing" or "drawing in" his or her own purely subjective interpretations into the text, unsupported by the text itself. In “proving” something from scripture it is easy to impose ones opinion instead of seeking the Bibles true meaning. Eisegesis leads to bad theology and bad doctrine.

| Reply
Jan 15, 2020 23:39:31   #
Zemirah Loc: Sojourner En Route...
 
"Western" civilization and all that encompasses has just exited the most frenzied calendar days of the year...

All who participate in that revelry are exhausted, Canuckus, and taking stock of how thoroughly they just destroyed their budget for the year now upon us.

On the other hand, that may have absolutely nothing to do with the apparent quietness you've observed.

...but quiet is always enjoyable, and usually preferable to the alternatives.



Canuckus Deploracus wrote:
Goos read..

I was just thinking that the FSR section has been rather quiet lately...


| Reply
Jan 16, 2020 00:07:20   #
Zemirah Loc: Sojourner En Route...
 
Your words lead to a universally foregone conclusion.

Some of us write on what the God-inspired-Bible says,

Others on what, in their own opinion, it should say.

Thank you for your effort.

Without the indwelling Holy Spirit, the Bible's purpose and meaning will always be clouded to any reader.

Biblical hermeneutics is the study of the principles of interpretation concerning the books of the Bible. It is part of the broader field of hermeneutics, which involves the study of principles of interpretation for all forms of communication, nonverbal and verbal.

In the interpretation of a text, hermeneutics considers the original medium as well as what language says, supposes, doesn't say, and implies. The process consists of several steps for best attaining the Scriptural author's intended meaning(s).

Lexical-syntactical analysis: This step looks at the words used and the way the words are used. Different order of the sentence, the punctuation, the tense of the verse are all aspects that are looked at in the lexical syntactical method. Here, lexicons and grammar aids can help in extracting meaning from the text.
Historical/cultural analysis: The history and culture surrounding the authors is important to understand to aid in interpretation. For instance, understanding the Jewish sects of the Palestine and the government that ruled Palestine in New Testament times increases understanding of Scripture. And, understanding the connotations of positions such as the High Priest and that of the tax collector helps us know what others thought of the people holding these positions.
Contextual analysis: A verse out of context can often be taken to mean something completely different from the intention. This method focuses on the importance of looking at the context of a verse in its chapter, book and even biblical context.
Theological analysis: It is often said that a single verse usually doesn't make a theology. This is because Scripture often touches on issues in several books. For instance, gifts of the Spirit are spoken about in Romans, Ephesians and 1 Corinthians. To take a verse from Corinthians without taking into account other passages that deal with the same topic can cause a poor interpretation.
Special literary analysis: There are several special literary aspects to look at, but the overarching theme is that each genre of Scripture has a different set of rules that applies to it. Of the genres found in Scripture, there are: narratives, histories, prophecies, apocalyptic writings, poetry, psalms and letters. In these, there are differing levels of allegory, figurative language, metaphors, similes and literal language. For instance, the apocalyptic writings and poetry have more figurative and allegorical language than does the narrative or historical writing. These must be addressed, and the genre recognized to gain a full understanding of the intended meaning.

In a way that differs from tenets of other religions [such as Islam, for instance], the message of the Bible is solidly grounded in history.

Henry A Virkler, "Hermeneutics: Principles and Processes of Biblical Interpretation;"1981




Fodaoson wrote:
Some people misread the Bible and misquote it., In the study of Biblical theology there are two opposing methods of interpretation, Exegesis and Eisegesis. Eisegesis (/ˌaɪsɪˈdʒiːsɪs/) is the process of interpreting text in such a way as to introduce one's own presuppositions, agendas or biases. ... Exegesis is drawing out text's meaning in accordance with the author's context and discoverable meaning. Eisegesis is when a reader imposes their interpretation of the text. Theological scholars have long been preoccupied with interpreting the meanings of various passages in the Bible. English speakers have used the word exegesis - a descendant of the Greek term exegeisthai, meaning "to explain" or "to interpret" - to refer to explanations of Scripture since the early 17th century. In biblical exegesis, the opposite of exegesis (to draw out) is eisegesis (to draw in), in the sense of an eisegetic commentator "importing" or "drawing in" his or her own purely subjective interpretations into the text, unsupported by the text itself. In “proving” something from scripture it is easy to impose ones opinion instead of seeking the Bibles true meaning. Eisegesis leads to bad theology and bad doctrine.
Some people misread the Bible and misquote it., In... (show quote)

| Reply
Jan 16, 2020 05:48:48   #
Zemirah Loc: Sojourner En Route...
 
Ethos is a Greek word meaning "character" that is used to describe the guiding beliefs or ideals that characterize a community, nation, or ideology.

The ethos of early Christianity can be summarized in two basic principles:

1) The earliest Christians (29 A.D.-313 A.D.) focused on living in the light of the Christian Gospel of Jesus Christ, the Good News, and on explaining that message to nonbelievers,

2) Early Christian doctrine is therefore less elaborately defined than are contemporary formulations as the focus was on living the gospel, rather than on sharpening their theological hair-splitting prowess.


However, God's Word in 2nd Timothy 2:15 commands us to use exegetical methods: “Present yourself to God as one approved, a workman who does not need to be ashamed and who correctly handles the word of truth.” An honest student of the Bible will be an exegete, allowing the text to speak for itself.

Eisegesis, on the other hand, easily lends itself to error, as the would-be mis-interpreter attempts to align the text with his own preconceived notions.

Once more, exegesis leads us to agree with the Bible; whereas a purveyor of eisegesis seeks to reinterpret the Bible to force it to agree with him/her.

That should be clear to all readers.



Fodaoson wrote:
Some people misread the Bible and misquote it., In the study of Biblical theology there are two opposing methods of interpretation, Exegesis and Eisegesis. Eisegesis (/ˌaɪsɪˈdʒiːsɪs/) is the process of interpreting text in such a way as to introduce one's own presuppositions, agendas or biases. ... Exegesis is drawing out text's meaning in accordance with the author's context and discoverable meaning. Eisegesis is when a reader imposes their interpretation of the text. Theological scholars have long been preoccupied with interpreting the meanings of various passages in the Bible. English speakers have used the word exegesis - a descendant of the Greek term exegeisthai, meaning "to explain" or "to interpret" - to refer to explanations of Scripture since the early 17th century. In biblical exegesis, the opposite of exegesis (to draw out) is eisegesis (to draw in), in the sense of an eisegetic commentator "importing" or "drawing in" his or her own purely subjective interpretations into the text, unsupported by the text itself. In “proving” something from scripture it is easy to impose ones opinion instead of seeking the Bibles true meaning. Eisegesis leads to bad theology and bad doctrine.
Some people misread the Bible and misquote it., In... (show quote)

| Reply
Jan 16, 2020 11:54:25   #
bahmer
 
Zemirah wrote:
Jesus Christ's intention for every Christian is that they are to prove all things by the Word of God, all churches, all ministers, bishops, deacons and elders, all teaching, all preaching, all doctrines, all sermons, all writings, all opinions, all practices. These are His marching orders:

Prove all by the Word of God (1 Thessalonians 5:21); measure all by the measure of the Bible; compare all with the standard of the Bible; weigh all in the balances of the Bible; examine all by the light of the Bible; test all in the crucible of the Bible.

That which can abide the fire of the Bible, receive, hold, believe, and obey. That which cannot abide the fire of the Bible, reject, refuse, repudiate, and cast away.

John Wycliffe: Prove all things of God through the Scriptures

John Wycliffe was one of those individuals who seem to have been born before their time. A brilliant and courageous cleric and scholar, Wycliffe is mainly remembered for producing the first Bible in English, - the inspiration and figurehead for that dangerous and secretive undertaking. Mystery still surrounds the sudden appearance of numerous hand-copied Bibles among a population who previously had been held in scriptural illiteracy by a church jealous of its influence, power, wealth and privileges.

This is the standard which John Wycliffe raised in England.
This is the flag which he nailed to the mast. May it never be lowered.

Born:c. 1328, Hipswell, Yorkshire, England
Died:Dec 31, 1384, Lutterworth, Leicestershire, England
Alma Mater: Merton College, Oxford

(c. 1320s – 31 December 1384, English scholastic philosopher, theologian, priest, biblical translator, reformer, minister, and professor at the University of Oxford. He was an early influential dissident within the priesthood, an ardent defender of the practices set forth in Scripture, and is considered an important predecessor to the Reformation.

John Wycliffe's ideology was often concerned with church reform. In a series of political-ecclesiastical treatises, Wycliffe expounded his view that the church of his day should return to evangelical poverty. Later he began a systematic attack on its non-biblical beliefs and practices, which included condemnation of every doctrine men had added to the church of Jesus Christ that was unknown to the Apostles.

Wycliffe attacked the privileged status of the clergy, which had bolstered their powerful role in England. He then attacked the luxury and pomp of local parishes and their elaborate ceremonies. Most important to his legacy, Wycliffe also advocated the translation of the Bible into the common language.

Noting that the Bible said the gospel was to be given freely, Wycliffe attacked the money-grabbing and impoverishing practices of the medieval church. Decrying the feudal power of the church, he held that each person was directly responsible to God.

John Wycliffe produced some of the first handwritten English translations of the Bible and helped to make them widely available to all men as God intended, rather than just to the church leadership.

Decades after his death, Wycliffe and his teachings were still perceived to be a threat by the church at Rome. Because he had escaped the prescribed punishment for heresy while alive, he was tried a second time in 1415 and this time condemned, although long since dead.

The Council of Constance ordered that his body be disinterred and burned. Pope Martin V approved the order, and the deed was carried out in 1428, approximately 44 years after Wycliffe’s death. His bones were burned in a field of execution and the ashes scattered in the River Swift near Lutterworth.

Yet does John Wycliffe's spirit reside at the throne of God today, for Scripture tells all believers (2nd Corinthians 5:6, 5:8) that to be absent from the body is to be present with their Lord.

Wycliffe’s influence proved harder to destroy than his mortal remains, however. The Word of God had been savored by many English people and, in spite of a grim century of suppression that was to follow, the stage had been set for the great work of translation from the original languages that would be undertaken by William Tyndale.

Today, the Tyndale Center for Bible Translation provides training in Bible translation at The Master’s Seminary within the context of the Master of Divinity program. Outside the classroom, the center seeks to raise awareness of the pressing need for translation and to serve as a resource for the global church.

The greatest need now is for Scripture in the over 1,636 languages without a Bible yet written in their own language. Another 2,584 languages have some work in progress, but still are waiting for a finished translation of God's Word.

"And this good news of the kingdom will be given through all the world for a witness to all nations; and then the end will come." (Matthew 24:14)

To prove all things of God, is to be able to read the Bible, and to find and confirm the truth for yourself in the Scriptures. You will find contentment, and eternal life, through Jesus Christ, for it is He of whom the Scriptures speak.
Jesus Christ's intention for every Christian is th... (show quote)


Amen and Amen thank you for that Zemirah I didn't know much of that but I see that we are backsliding from what Wycliffe preached at this present day.

| Reply
Jan 17, 2020 05:56:31   #
Zemirah Loc: Sojourner En Route...
 
Hi bahmer,

I think you're right.

We, as the Christian church at large, from all evidence, do appear, in good part, to be backsliding from what every godly pastor has preached for the last two thousand years.

So many of those standing behind our pulpits need a rude awakening of some sort... or perhaps they need more prayers on their behave.


bahmer wrote:
Amen and Amen thank you for that Zemirah I didn't know much of that but I see that we are backsliding from what Wycliffe preached at this present day.

| Reply
Jan 18, 2020 20:59:03   #
Fodaoson Loc: South Texas
 
Zemirah wrote:
Ethos is a Greek word meaning "character" that is used to describe the guiding beliefs or ideals that characterize a community, nation, or ideology.

The ethos of early Christianity can be summarized in two basic principles:

1) The earliest Christians (29 A.D.-313 A.D.) focused on living in the light of the Christian Gospel of Jesus Christ, the Good News, and on explaining that message to nonbelievers,

2) Early Christian doctrine is therefore less elaborately defined than are contemporary formulations as the focus was on living the gospel, rather than on sharpening their theological hair-splitting prowess.


However, God's Word in 2nd Timothy 2:15 commands us to use exegetical methods: “Present yourself to God as one approved, a workman who does not need to be ashamed and who correctly handles the word of truth.” An honest student of the Bible will be an exegete, allowing the text to speak for itself.

Eisegesis, on the other hand, easily lends itself to error, as the would-be mis-interpreter attempts to align the text with his own preconceived notions.

Once more, exegesis leads us to agree with the Bible; whereas a purveyor of eisegesis seeks to reinterpret the Bible to force it to agree with him/her.

That should be clear to all readers.
Ethos is a Greek word meaning "character"... (show quote)


“…exegesis leads us to agree with the Bible; whereas a purveyor of eisegesis seeks to reinterpret the Bible to force it to agree with him/her.”
SOMETIMES in SOME Bible studies eisegesis creeps in. Personal opinion is expressed rather than an exegesis of the word.

| Reply
Jan 19, 2020 00:15:22   #
Zemirah Loc: Sojourner En Route...
 
Conflating our own preference for what we would like the written Word of God to mean is to be avoided and guarded against at all times. Nothing could be more obvious.

It is really difficult for me to imagine anyone seriously engaging in an effort to out write God, or egotistical enough to believe they could get on the same playing field.

Based on the frequency with which you entertain the notion, it has apparently been personally encountered or drilled into your awareness as of top concern... and all who note your warning must surely appreciate your feeling of anxiety.

A deliberate misrepresentation of one's beliefs, opinions, writings, etc., i.e., a "purveyor of eisegesis" - (if you prefer - which is a bit more pretentious), as the beliefs, opinion, thoughts or writings of someone else, anyone else, is certainly something against which all are on guard, although, IMHO, to most of us, and to my own experience, it has never been a temptation.

God's writings cannot be surpassed or even equaled by any mere mortal, and as Jesus, the Living Logos, said that His sheep, those who belong to Him would always know His voice and be able to differentiate between His words and those of an imposter, all those who truly follow Him will always be able to spiritually discern what is and is not of God.


Fodaoson wrote:
“…exegesis leads us to agree with the Bible; whereas a purveyor of eisegesis seeks to reinterpret the Bible to force it to agree with him/her.”
SOMETIMES in SOME Bible studies eisegesis creeps in. Personal opinion is expressed rather than an exegesis of the word.

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