One Political PlazaSM - Home of politics
Tribute to Greg Ward
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
Sep 5, 2019 15:05:33   #
Richard Rowland
 
Yesterday, I had an appointment at the farrier to have four of our eleven horses trimmed, and a set of shoes put on one. All but two, at this point, have had their hooves trimmed and shoes put on the ones that required them.

Some of the eleven are mostly pasture ornaments. That includes one little mare we call Triple Girl. The word triple must be in her papered name, the reason for the word triple, but at the moment, I don't recall. Anyway, she's sort of a stinker. She is one of a pair that I purchased at a Ramond Sutton annual weanling sale held at Gedisberg, South Dakota, twelve years ago.

Even as a weanling, I noticed something special in her, and had hoped to eventually put her in cutting horse training. Unfortunately, she injured herself while still very young, which dashed any hopes I had for her. As I indicated she is a bit of a stinker. While she never bucked while being started, it could have had something to do with the old injury, she never fully corporates with anything.

It's a struggle to get the saddle on her and then to get on. She is difficult to catch if she sees a halter being carried. Often when I know I have to catch her for some reason or another, I'll start in phases. First, when she has her head in the feed bunk, I'll tie a grab twine around her neck.

After she and her heard mates have finished eating, and I'm now ready to accomplish what I have in mind, I'll hide a halter in a feed bucket and take some horse treats out to entice her. Sometimes, I'll take some treats out beforehand to warm her up to the idea of getting more treats latter. Of course, the other horses also want a treat, which will make my objective a bit more complicated.

However, when the time comes, and if things go as planned, I'll be able to grab hold the twine that I had placed around her neck, retrieve the halter from the bucket thereby accomplishing the goal intended.

Yesterday, when the warmup process of getting future treats was over, and as I was climbing back on the four-wheeler, she bit me in the shoulder. Perhaps she thought she is entitled to more treats.


That special place she holds is due to the story of trainer Greg Ward and the feisty little mare Fillinic. My Triple Girl reminds me of her. While I'm no Greg Ward, what I do have in common with him is that he loved his horses.

Here is a piece about the late Greg Ward. You'll notice the writer of this piece wept when receiving the news of Greg's death. One has to be sensitive to animals to understand Greg's love for his horses. Even though probably having never heard of Greg Ward, the empathy shared by all who have a love for our four-legged critters will understand why the writer wept when hearing of his death, and perhaps shed a few tears of our own.

https://horseandrider.com/training/greg-ward-farewell-to-the-master

| Reply
Sep 5, 2019 15:57:38   #
slatten49 (a regular here)
 
Thanks for your post and in sharing that great story.

One specific thing I will take from it is Greg Ward's borrowed quote/motto: "Yesterday is history. Tomorrow is a mystery. Today is a gift--that's why it's called the present."

| Reply
Sep 5, 2019 16:50:31   #
Hug (a regular here)
 
Richard, great article. I have not heard of Greg Ward.

| Reply
Sep 5, 2019 19:05:48   #
Iliamna1 (a regular here)
 
Apparently there are quite a few horse-loving members here on OPP. Due to the efforts and work from men such as Greg Ward, training has changed for the better. Horses are so smart and they understand a lot more than most people realize, whatever the type of work they're trained to do, everything from herding cattle to seeing-eye ponies.


From Job 39, NASB: 19 “Do you give the horse his might?
Do you clothe his neck with a mane?
20 “Do you make him leap like the locust?
His majestic snorting is terrible.
21 “He paws in the valley, and rejoices in his strength;
He goes out to meet the weapons.
22 “He laughs at fear and is not dismayed;
And he does not turn back from the sword.
23 “The quiver rattles against him,
The flashing spear and javelin.
24 “With shaking and rage he races over the ground,
And he does not stand still at the voice of the trumpet.
25 “As often as the trumpet sounds he says, ‘Aha!’
And he scents the battle from afar,
And the thunder of the captains and the war cry.


The horse is truly one of God's gifts to mankind.

| Reply
Sep 7, 2019 11:29:15   #
bahmer (a regular here)
 
Richard Rowland wrote:
Yesterday, I had an appointment at the farrier to have four of our eleven horses trimmed, and a set of shoes put on one. All but two, at this point, have had their hooves trimmed and shoes put on the ones that required them.

Some of the eleven are mostly pasture ornaments. That includes one little mare we call Triple Girl. The word triple must be in her papered name, the reason for the word triple, but at the moment, I don't recall. Anyway, she's sort of a stinker. She is one of a pair that I purchased at a Ramond Sutton annual weanling sale held at Gedisberg, South Dakota, twelve years ago.

Even as a weanling, I noticed something special in her, and had hoped to eventually put her in cutting horse training. Unfortunately, she injured herself while still very young, which dashed any hopes I had for her. As I indicated she is a bit of a stinker. While she never bucked while being started, it could have had something to do with the old injury, she never fully corporates with anything.

It's a struggle to get the saddle on her and then to get on. She is difficult to catch if she sees a halter being carried. Often when I know I have to catch her for some reason or another, I'll start in phases. First, when she has her head in the feed bunk, I'll tie a grab twine around her neck.

After she and her heard mates have finished eating, and I'm now ready to accomplish what I have in mind, I'll hide a halter in a feed bucket and take some horse treats out to entice her. Sometimes, I'll take some treats out beforehand to warm her up to the idea of getting more treats latter. Of course, the other horses also want a treat, which will make my objective a bit more complicated.

However, when the time comes, and if things go as planned, I'll be able to grab hold the twine that I had placed around her neck, retrieve the halter from the bucket thereby accomplishing the goal intended.

Yesterday, when the warmup process of getting future treats was over, and as I was climbing back on the four-wheeler, she bit me in the shoulder. Perhaps she thought she is entitled to more treats.


That special place she holds is due to the story of trainer Greg Ward and the feisty little mare Fillinic. My Triple Girl reminds me of her. While I'm no Greg Ward, what I do have in common with him is that he loved his horses.

Here is a piece about the late Greg Ward. You'll notice the writer of this piece wept when receiving the news of Greg's death. One has to be sensitive to animals to understand Greg's love for his horses. Even though probably having never heard of Greg Ward, the empathy shared by all who have a love for our four-legged critters will understand why the writer wept when hearing of his death, and perhaps shed a few tears of our own.

https://horseandrider.com/training/greg-ward-farewell-to-the-master
Yesterday, I had an appointment at the farrier to ... (show quote)


For all those that are concerned Richard Rowland has been suspended from OPP for a period of three days and he requested that I let everyone know.

| Reply
Sep 9, 2019 09:10:39   #
Rose42 (a regular here)
 
Great story!

I saw he was suspended. Odd. There are others who are far worse on a regular basis.

| Reply
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
OnePoliticalPlaza.com - Forum
Copyright 2012-2019 IDF International Technologies, Inc.