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paper sheets kill Jeffery?
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Aug 13, 2019 16:10:10   #
badbobby (a regular here)
 
lpnmajor wrote:
Oh come on, everybody has tried to hang themselves with paper bed sheets at one time or another.

Doc,you really shouldn't tell Slatten's secrets


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Aug 13, 2019 16:14:15   #
badbobby (a regular here)
 
woodguru wrote:
Your "opinion" can't begin to be objective let alone free of bias if you are going to assign a political spin before we know much of anything. Epstein was toxic bad news for wealthy players in both parties.

Anyone going partisan on this this early won't begin to sort out sources and reality. The truth will be in the ongoing coverups, of which Barr is likely to have a heavy hand in.


Cmon woody
you say we shouldn't get political
and then in the next breath you jump all over Barr
Sad

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Aug 13, 2019 16:46:56   #
bahmer (a regular here)
 
badbobby wrote:
the report now is out
that Epsiein was kneeling on the floor with paper bed sheets tied around his neck and the bed frame
I for one find that conclusion a lil ridiculous
I think he had help


He did have help the cameras weren't working and the guards hadn't checked his cell for hours. Hell they could have had several guys come in and take him out and no one would be the wiser.

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Aug 13, 2019 17:02:51   #
Blade_Runner (a regular here)
 
All of this speculation, conjecture and second guessing, all of this subjective and politically driven opinionating over Epstein's death would be hilarious if it weren't so damned pathetic.

Every time a high profile event occurs, there are those who are not comfortable unless they can immediately wrap the entire event in a tidy little package that explains it. They can't leave anything to chance, nothing mysterious or inexplicable must remain, so, they concoct a story that fits their agenda and satisfies their sense of right and wrong.

I have no problem with asking questions and hoping for answers, but drawing conclusions based on assumptions, conjecture, pipe dreams and wishful thinking is pathological.

Psychologists have identified three psychological motives that drive conspiracy beliefs. These are:

epistemic — a way to make sense of chaos and random events;
existential — the pursuit of safety, security, and empowerment; and
social — a desire for belonging to a group with a shared belief system.

None of you are witnesses, none of you saw what happened, none of you have seen Epstein's body, none of you are involved in the investigation, IOW, none of you know dick shit about Epstein's death.

I'll stick with the questions and hope for answers, and if the answers are not forthcoming or hard to believe, I'll chalk it up to the human condition and move on. I will never jump aboard a conspiracy train going nowhere.

Way I see the Big Picture, we have a hell of lot of bigger fish to fry than finding who killed an infamous sexual deviant who raped young girls. Until and unless we know different, I'll go with Occam's Razor--Epstein killed himself.

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Aug 13, 2019 17:30:07   #
slatten49 (a regular here)
 
Blade_Runner wrote:
All of this speculation, conjecture and second guessing, all of this subjective and politically driven opinionating over Epstein's death would be hilarious if it weren't so damned pathetic.

Every time a high profile event occurs, there are those who are not comfortable unless they can immediately wrap the entire event in a tidy little package that explains it. They can't leave anything to chance, nothing mysterious or inexplicable must remain, so, they concoct a story that fits their agenda and satisfies their sense of right and wrong.

I have no problem with asking questions and hoping for answers, but drawing conclusions based on assumptions, conjecture, pipe dreams and wishful thinking is pathological.

Psychologists have identified three psychological motives that drive conspiracy beliefs. These are:

epistemic — a way to make sense of chaos and random events;
existential — the pursuit of safety, security, and empowerment; and
social — a desire for belonging to a group with a shared belief system.

None of you are witnesses, none of you saw what happened, none of you have seen Epstein's body, none of you are involved in the investigation, IOW, none of you know dick shit about Epstein's death.

I'll stick with the questions and hope for answers, and if the answers are not forthcoming or hard to believe, I'll chalk it up to the human condition and move on. I will never jump aboard a conspiracy train going nowhere.

Way I see the Big Picture, we have a hell of lot of bigger fish to fry than finding who killed an infamous sexual deviant who raped young girls. Until and unless we know different, I'll go with Occam's Razor--Epstein killed himself.
All of this speculation, conjecture and second gue... (show quote)

Though I tend to agree with you, I repeat: Suicide or not, his death should not have occurred while imprisoned and under surveillance. That, in itself, stinks to high heaven.

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Aug 13, 2019 17:33:34   #
Rose42 (a regular here)
 
Occams razor is not logic. Its philosophy. Often the simplest answer isn’t always correct and the use of it can limit one’s thinking. I’m speaking generally.

Personally I don’t really care if he was killed. I wish he’d have stayed alive so more sickos could have been caught.

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Aug 13, 2019 17:43:34   #
Larai (a regular here)
 
Rose42 wrote:
Occams razor is not logic. Its philosophy. Often the simplest answer isn’t always correct and the use of it can limit one’s thinking. I’m speaking generally.

Personally I don’t really care if he was killed. I wish he’d have stayed alive so more sickos could have been caught.


I Agree! I am sure there is a lot of speculation, that is Human nature.. we speculate, and given what we Do know, as Slatten said regardless of whether it was suicide or murder, I just think something very hinky went on there, especially after those documents were made "public" and the fact that he was planning on dropping some more names.. be they republican or dem.. doesn't matter.. the Coincidence of the timing of this death in relation to his stated cooperation stinks to high heaven... I'll just wait until the investigation is over.. we shall then see what's what.. maybe..Or maybe it'll get buried.. Hard tellin..

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Aug 13, 2019 17:46:55   #
badbobby (a regular here)
 
Rose42 wrote:
Occams razor is not logic. Its philosophy. Often the simplest answer isn’t always correct and the use of it can limit one’s thinking. I’m speaking generally.

Personally I don’t really care if he was killed. I wish he’d have stayed alive so more sickos could have been caught.
\
you go Rose


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Aug 13, 2019 17:55:54   #
Blade_Runner (a regular here)
 
slatten49 wrote:
Though I tend to agree with you, I repeat: Suicide or not, his death should not have occurred while imprisoned and under surveillance. That, in itself, stinks to high heaven.

Y'all might want to do some research on the conditions existing in the federal prison system. The big ones are funding and a critical shortage in staff, primarily COs. They are having a hell of a time recruiting COs to replace those who retire, resign, or quit for a better job. Many COs are working continuous overtime to take up the slack, some as much a 80 hours a week.

It ain't a pretty picture.

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Aug 13, 2019 18:04:02   #
badbobby (a regular here)
 
Blade_Runner wrote:
Y'all might want to do some research on the conditions existing in the federal prison system. The big ones are funding and a critical shortage in staff, primarily COs. They are having a hell of a time recruiting COs to replace those who retire, resign, or quit for a better job. Many COs are working continuous overtime to take up the slack, some as much a 80 hours a week.

It ain't a pretty picture.

then wouldn't it make sense to keep a man intent on destroying himself in a safer place?

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Aug 13, 2019 18:07:37   #
Blade_Runner (a regular here)
 
Rose42 wrote:
Occams razor is not logic. Its philosophy. Often the simplest answer isn’t always correct and the use of it can limit one’s thinking. I’m speaking generally.

Personally I don’t really care if he was killed. I wish he’d have stayed alive so more sickos could have been caught.
Sorry, Rose, that is my personal approach to this conspiracy madness. You failed to address the point of my post, it ain't about me.


Interesting though, that the crime novels of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Sherlock Holmes) have established 7 investigative strategies that have been adopted as scientifically sound, quite logical.

"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."

Therefore, Occam's Razor makes sense--when there is more than one explanation for an occurrence, the one that requires the least speculation is usually correct. Another way of saying it is that the more assumptions you have to make, the more unlikely the explanation.

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Aug 13, 2019 18:08:56   #
Blade_Runner (a regular here)
 
badbobby wrote:
then wouldn't it make sense to keep a man intent on destroying himself in a safer place?
Yeah, you could fly him under guard to the moon.

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Aug 13, 2019 18:19:09   #
Rose42 (a regular here)
 
Blade_Runner wrote:
Sorry, Rose, that is my personal approach to this conspiracy madness. You failed to address the point of my post, it ain't about me.


Interesting though, that the crime novels of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Sherlock Holmes) have established 7 investigative strategies that have been adopted as scientifically sound, quite logical.

"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."

Therefore, Occam's Razor makes sense--when there is more than one explanation for an occurrence, the one that requires the least speculation is usually correct. Another way of saying it is that the more assumptions you have to make, the more unlikely the explanation.
Sorry, Rose, that is my personal approach to this ... (show quote)


It was not my intent to make it about you. Just pointing out its a philosophy that doesn’t always apply. And in this case what’s improbable - that he was killed - may be true due to many factors. I don’t think it is but I won’t dismiss the possibility out of hand. That wouldn’t be logical either.

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Aug 13, 2019 18:20:30   #
Rose42 (a regular here)
 
badbobby wrote:
then wouldn't it make sense to keep a man intent on destroying himself in a safer place?


You’d think so.

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Aug 13, 2019 18:38:07   #
slatten49 (a regular here)
 
Blade_Runner wrote:
Y'all might want to do some research on the conditions existing in the federal prison system. The big ones are funding and a critical shortage in staff, primarily COs. They are having a hell of a time recruiting COs to replace those who retire, resign, or quit for a better job. Many COs are working continuous overtime to take up the slack, some as much a 80 hours a week.

It ain't a pretty picture.

I have a pretty good idea, Blade. My older brother was a corrections officer at the Texas state prison outside of Childress, Texas. Decent benefits lured him into taking the job. Due to the hours, working conditions and disgust in dealing with the prison population, he quit fairly shortly afterwards...maybe two years later.

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