One Political PlazaSM - Home of politics
Challenges In Being a Political Moderate
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
Page: 1 2 3 next>>
Apr 14, 2019 07:49:16   #
slatten49 (a regular here)
 
From The Inquistor; February 16, 2017

By John Butler

Now more than ever, being a political moderate is extremely challenging for those who do not agree wholeheartedly with either of the two major political parties’ ideologies.

The polarizing nature of the most recent presidential nomination campaign, presidential election, and subsequent activity by the current administration have pitted friends and family alike against each other, forcing people to choose a side. While the Republican/Democrat rivalry has existed for well over a century, tensions between supporters of the two sides have rarely been so intense during the last 30 years, even including the Monica Lewinsky scandal during Bill Clinton’s tenure as president.

The definition that comes up on Google is “In politics and religion, a moderate is an individual who is not extreme, partisan, nor radical. In recent years, the term political moderates has gained traction as a buzzword. The existence of the ideal moderate is disputed because of a lack of a moderate political ideology.”

Essentially, a true political moderate is someone who does not hold to a party line, who may disagree with aspects of the GOP while supporting other agendas. The moderate may agree with portions of the Democratic party’s purposes while opposing others.

As most of us are well aware, the intensity of the recent election and the actions of the current administration have raised tensions on virtually all major matters to unseen heights. Social media users unfriend people for their political views now more than ever. Twitter, that bastion of Trump interaction, buzzes constantly, with more and more bans coming every day due to the vehemence of people on both sides of issues.

The concept of us versus them, Red or Blue, and that only one side is correct are all partly at fault for the challenges political moderates face. If I, who has many conservative Republican family members, were to say something in support of Obamacare, I would likely receive backlash from those comments. On the other hand, were I to come out on social media in support of Donald Trump’s immigration freeze, I would likely have many of my liberal friends comment angrily or unfriend me.

As such, political moderates who voice opinions tend to lose out either way. The current political climate is decidedly unfriendly towards anyone who has not picked a side in the ongoing debates. Even criticizing a clear blunder by one party or another will bring the wrath of half of America down on a someone’s head.

| Reply
Apr 14, 2019 07:52:16   #
Sew_What (a regular here)
 
slatten49 wrote:
From The Inquistor; February 16, 2017

By John Butler

Now more than ever, being a political moderate is extremely challenging for those who do not agree wholeheartedly with either of the two major political parties’ ideologies.

The polarizing nature of the most recent presidential nomination campaign, presidential election, and subsequent activity by the current administration have pitted friends and family alike against each other, forcing people to choose a side. While the Republican/Democrat rivalry has existed for well over a century, tensions between supporters of the two sides have rarely been so intense during the last 30 years, even including the Monica Lewinsky scandal during Bill Clinton’s tenure as president.

The definition that comes up on Google is “In politics and religion, a moderate is an individual who is not extreme, partisan, nor radical. In recent years, the term political moderates has gained traction as a buzzword. The existence of the ideal moderate is disputed because of a lack of a moderate political ideology.”

Essentially, a true political moderate is someone who does not hold to a party line, who may disagree with aspects of the GOP while supporting other agendas. The moderate may agree with portions of the Democratic party’s purposes while opposing others.

As most of us are well aware, the intensity of the recent election and the actions of the current administration have raised tensions on virtually all major matters to unseen heights. Social media users unfriend people for their political views now more than ever. Twitter, that bastion of Trump interaction, buzzes constantly, with more and more bans coming every day due to the vehemence of people on both sides of issues.

The concept of us versus them, Red or Blue, and that only one side is correct are all partly at fault for the challenges political moderates face. If I, who has many conservative Republican family members, were to say something in support of Obamacare, I would likely receive backlash from those comments. On the other hand, were I to come out on social media in support of Donald Trump’s immigration freeze, I would likely have many of my liberal friends comment angrily or unfriend me.

As such, political moderates who voice opinions tend to lose out either way. The current political climate is decidedly unfriendly towards anyone who has not picked a side in the ongoing debates. Even criticizing a clear blunder by one party or another will bring the wrath of half of America down on a someone’s head.
From The Inquistor; February 16, 2017 br br By Jo... (show quote)


Indeed~

| Reply
Apr 14, 2019 08:25:11   #
lpnmajor (a regular here)
 
slatten49 wrote:
From The Inquistor; February 16, 2017

By John Butler

Now more than ever, being a political moderate is extremely challenging for those who do not agree wholeheartedly with either of the two major political parties’ ideologies.

The polarizing nature of the most recent presidential nomination campaign, presidential election, and subsequent activity by the current administration have pitted friends and family alike against each other, forcing people to choose a side. While the Republican/Democrat rivalry has existed for well over a century, tensions between supporters of the two sides have rarely been so intense during the last 30 years, even including the Monica Lewinsky scandal during Bill Clinton’s tenure as president.

The definition that comes up on Google is “In politics and religion, a moderate is an individual who is not extreme, partisan, nor radical. In recent years, the term political moderates has gained traction as a buzzword. The existence of the ideal moderate is disputed because of a lack of a moderate political ideology.”

Essentially, a true political moderate is someone who does not hold to a party line, who may disagree with aspects of the GOP while supporting other agendas. The moderate may agree with portions of the Democratic party’s purposes while opposing others.

As most of us are well aware, the intensity of the recent election and the actions of the current administration have raised tensions on virtually all major matters to unseen heights. Social media users unfriend people for their political views now more than ever. Twitter, that bastion of Trump interaction, buzzes constantly, with more and more bans coming every day due to the vehemence of people on both sides of issues.

The concept of us versus them, Red or Blue, and that only one side is correct are all partly at fault for the challenges political moderates face. If I, who has many conservative Republican family members, were to say something in support of Obamacare, I would likely receive backlash from those comments. On the other hand, were I to come out on social media in support of Donald Trump’s immigration freeze, I would likely have many of my liberal friends comment angrily or unfriend me.

As such, political moderates who voice opinions tend to lose out either way. The current political climate is decidedly unfriendly towards anyone who has not picked a side in the ongoing debates. Even criticizing a clear blunder by one party or another will bring the wrath of half of America down on a someone’s head.
From The Inquistor; February 16, 2017 br br By Jo... (show quote)


Yup.

| Reply
Apr 14, 2019 09:01:33   #
debeda (a regular here)
 
slatten49 wrote:
From The Inquistor; February 16, 2017

By John Butler

Now more than ever, being a political moderate is extremely challenging for those who do not agree wholeheartedly with either of the two major political parties’ ideologies.

The polarizing nature of the most recent presidential nomination campaign, presidential election, and subsequent activity by the current administration have pitted friends and family alike against each other, forcing people to choose a side. While the Republican/Democrat rivalry has existed for well over a century, tensions between supporters of the two sides have rarely been so intense during the last 30 years, even including the Monica Lewinsky scandal during Bill Clinton’s tenure as president.

The definition that comes up on Google is “In politics and religion, a moderate is an individual who is not extreme, partisan, nor radical. In recent years, the term political moderates has gained traction as a buzzword. The existence of the ideal moderate is disputed because of a lack of a moderate political ideology.”

Essentially, a true political moderate is someone who does not hold to a party line, who may disagree with aspects of the GOP while supporting other agendas. The moderate may agree with portions of the Democratic party’s purposes while opposing others.

As most of us are well aware, the intensity of the recent election and the actions of the current administration have raised tensions on virtually all major matters to unseen heights. Social media users unfriend people for their political views now more than ever. Twitter, that bastion of Trump interaction, buzzes constantly, with more and more bans coming every day due to the vehemence of people on both sides of issues.

The concept of us versus them, Red or Blue, and that only one side is correct are all partly at fault for the challenges political moderates face. If I, who has many conservative Republican family members, were to say something in support of Obamacare, I would likely receive backlash from those comments. On the other hand, were I to come out on social media in support of Donald Trump’s immigration freeze, I would likely have many of my liberal friends comment angrily or unfriend me.

As such, political moderates who voice opinions tend to lose out either way. The current political climate is decidedly unfriendly towards anyone who has not picked a side in the ongoing debates. Even criticizing a clear blunder by one party or another will bring the wrath of half of America down on a someone’s head.
From The Inquistor; February 16, 2017 br br By Jo... (show quote)


I agree with most of the article, EXCEPT the part that it began with the current administration. Many, many moderates felt this beginning in the Obama administration, when criticizing then-president Obama was tantamount to hate speech, racism and heresy. IMO. Those of you who supported Obama without restraint didn't feel it. But those of us who questioned some of his actions and policies sure did.

| Reply
Apr 14, 2019 09:10:29   #
MarvinSussman
 
slatten49 wrote:
From The Inquistor; February 16, 2017

By John Butler

Now more than ever, being a political moderate is extremely challenging for those who do not agree wholeheartedly with either of the two major political parties’ ideologies.

The polarizing nature of the most recent presidential nomination campaign, presidential election, and subsequent activity by the current administration have pitted friends and family alike against each other, forcing people to choose a side. While the Republican/Democrat rivalry has existed for well over a century, tensions between supporters of the two sides have rarely been so intense during the last 30 years, even including the Monica Lewinsky scandal during Bill Clinton’s tenure as president.

The definition that comes up on Google is “In politics and religion, a moderate is an individual who is not extreme, partisan, nor radical. In recent years, the term political moderates has gained traction as a buzzword. The existence of the ideal moderate is disputed because of a lack of a moderate political ideology.”

Essentially, a true political moderate is someone who does not hold to a party line, who may disagree with aspects of the GOP while supporting other agendas. The moderate may agree with portions of the Democratic party’s purposes while opposing others.

As most of us are well aware, the intensity of the recent election and the actions of the current administration have raised tensions on virtually all major matters to unseen heights. Social media users unfriend people for their political views now more than ever. Twitter, that bastion of Trump interaction, buzzes constantly, with more and more bans coming every day due to the vehemence of people on both sides of issues.

The concept of us versus them, Red or Blue, and that only one side is correct are all partly at fault for the challenges political moderates face. If I, who has many conservative Republican family members, were to say something in support of Obamacare, I would likely receive backlash from those comments. On the other hand, were I to come out on social media in support of Donald Trump’s immigration freeze, I would likely have many of my liberal friends comment angrily or unfriend me.

As such, political moderates who voice opinions tend to lose out either way. The current political climate is decidedly unfriendly towards anyone who has not picked a side in the ongoing debates. Even criticizing a clear blunder by one party or another will bring the wrath of half of America down on a someone’s head.
From The Inquistor; February 16, 2017 br br By Jo... (show quote)


Our Constitution’s Preamble states the aims of our federal government: justice, tranquility, defense, general welfare, and the “Blessings of Liberty” that we must provide for Posterity. Each of these goals implies the creation of institutions of considerable magnitude. Justice and tranquility require first responders, hospitals, courts, and prisons. Defense implies forces with unlimited needs that must be provided by the nation’s industry, which implies a system of education and healthcare. General welfare and “Blessings” imply an open-ended wish-list. We can put all of the above under the heading of “infrastructure”. Given that we are surrounded by hostile forces seeking to dominate us, our need for infrastructure is unlimited.

To provide for those infinite needs, Congress must plan for the world’s best infrastructure. Then it must create that infrastructure by buying the required human and material resources, spending as much as possible without causing inflation. Such spending will maximize after-tax savings (aka “deficit spending”) which, due to our trade deficit, exits circulation into foreign banks as well as into domestic banks. Thus, spending on infrastructure finances much of our consumption and our annual savings. Infrastructure = Consumption + Savings = Prosperity!

Thus, the need to combat inflation is a primary concern. With maximum spending there must be optimum taxation to remove excess discretionary income from the economy. With a liberal economy and relatively free trade, the distribution of income and wealth in the population will be top heavy. For efficient taxation of discretionary income, such a distribution requires steeply progressive federal income and estate tax brackets with no taxation of non-discretionary income and wealth. Because of “tax bracket creep”, progressive tax brackets provide negative feedback, smoothing fluctuations in the money supply and its effects on the economy.

Spending on infrastructure must be matched by spending on people. Until our munitions industry and armed forces are completely robotic, wars will be waged by people in the line of fire and those behind it. And they will be waged more successfully when our population is well-educated and healthy. Accordingly, there is no rational reason to require individuals to pay for their education or for their healthcare
.. There is every rational reason to provide expense-paid education for all at all levels of learning. Likewise, there should be free healthcare for all, including free nurseries, day-care, and pre-K for parents with such a need.

To fulfill the aims stated in the Preamble to our Constitution, Congress must order the physical structures and personnel required for these services. In effect, Congress should pay the people to provide the nation’s infrastructure and to provide both the best-educated and healthiest workforce and the world’s best military force. No other course can achieve the goals set for us by our Founders. And only the nation’s voters can make Congress do its duty!

© 2019 Marvin Sussman. All rights reserved. Search: YouTube.com for Marvin Sussman!

| Reply
Apr 14, 2019 09:23:47   #
debeda (a regular here)
 
MarvinSussman wrote:
Our Constitution’s Preamble states the aims of our federal government: justice, tranquility, defense, general welfare, and the “Blessings of Liberty” that we must provide for Posterity. Each of these goals implies the creation of institutions of considerable magnitude. Justice and tranquility require first responders, hospitals, courts, and prisons. Defense implies forces with unlimited needs that must be provided by the nation’s industry, which implies a system of education and healthcare. General welfare and “Blessings” imply an open-ended wish-list. We can put all of the above under the heading of “infrastructure”. Given that we are surrounded by hostile forces seeking to dominate us, our need for infrastructure is unlimited.

To provide for those infinite needs, Congress must plan for the world’s best infrastructure. Then it must create that infrastructure by buying the required human and material resources, spending as much as possible without causing inflation. Such spending will maximize after-tax savings (aka “deficit spending”) which, due to our trade deficit, exits circulation into foreign banks as well as into domestic banks. Thus, spending on infrastructure finances much of our consumption and our annual savings. Infrastructure = Consumption + Savings = Prosperity!

Thus, the need to combat inflation is a primary concern. With maximum spending there must be optimum taxation to remove excess discretionary income from the economy. With a liberal economy and relatively free trade, the distribution of income and wealth in the population will be top heavy. For efficient taxation of discretionary income, such a distribution requires steeply progressive federal income and estate tax brackets with no taxation of non-discretionary income and wealth. Because of “tax bracket creep”, progressive tax brackets provide negative feedback, smoothing fluctuations in the money supply and its effects on the economy.

Spending on infrastructure must be matched by spending on people. Until our munitions industry and armed forces are completely robotic, wars will be waged by people in the line of fire and those behind it. And they will be waged more successfully when our population is well-educated and healthy. Accordingly, there is no rational reason to require individuals to pay for their education or for their healthcare
.. There is every rational reason to provide expense-paid education for all at all levels of learning. Likewise, there should be free healthcare for all, including free nurseries, day-care, and pre-K for parents with such a need.

To fulfill the aims stated in the Preamble to our Constitution, Congress must order the physical structures and personnel required for these services. In effect, Congress should pay the people to provide the nation’s infrastructure and to provide both the best-educated and healthiest workforce and the world’s best military force. No other course can achieve the goals set for us by our Founders. And only the nation’s voters can make Congress do its duty!

© 2019 Marvin Sussman. All rights reserved. Search: YouTube.com for Marvin Sussman!
Our Constitution’s Preamble states the aims of our... (show quote)


Hmmmmm........

| Reply
Apr 14, 2019 09:25:32   #
TrueAmerican (a regular here)
 
debeda wrote:
I agree with most of the article, EXCEPT the part that it began with the current administration. Many, many moderates felt this beginning in the Obama administration, when criticizing then-president Obama was tantamount to hate speech, racism and heresy. IMO. Those of you who supported Obama without restraint didn't feel it. But those of us who questioned some of his actions and policies sure did.



| Reply
Apr 14, 2019 10:05:41   #
slatten49 (a regular here)
 
debeda wrote:
I agree with most of the article, EXCEPT the part that it began with the current administration. Many, many moderates felt this beginning in the Obama administration, when criticizing then-president Obama was tantamount to hate speech, racism and heresy. IMO. Those of you who supported Obama without restraint didn't feel it. But those of us who questioned some of his actions and policies sure did.

Fair enough, Debeda. Yet, an excerpt from the 2nd paragraph of the above article seems to contradict your assertion that "it began with the current administration"....

"...While the Republican/Democrat rivalry has existed for well over a century, tensions between supporters of the two sides have rarely been so intense during the last 30 years, even including the Monica Lewinsky scandal during Bill Clinton’s tenure as president."

| Reply
Apr 14, 2019 10:21:05   #
Larry the Legend (a regular here)
 
slatten49 wrote:
The current political climate is decidedly unfriendly towards anyone who has not picked a side in the ongoing debates. Even criticizing a clear blunder by one party or another will bring the wrath of half of America down on a someone’s head.

Divide and conquer. Feeling divided yet?

| Reply
Apr 14, 2019 10:23:11   #
slatten49 (a regular here)
 
Larry the Legend wrote:
Divide and conquer. Feeling divided yet?

The country, yes. Though, frankly speaking, I feel neither divided nor conquered.

How 'bout yourself

| Reply
Apr 14, 2019 10:25:29   #
Canuckus Deploracus (a regular here)
 
slatten49 wrote:
From The Inquistor; February 16, 2017

By John Butler

Now more than ever, being a political moderate is extremely challenging for those who do not agree wholeheartedly with either of the two major political parties’ ideologies.

The polarizing nature of the most recent presidential nomination campaign, presidential election, and subsequent activity by the current administration have pitted friends and family alike against each other, forcing people to choose a side. While the Republican/Democrat rivalry has existed for well over a century, tensions between supporters of the two sides have rarely been so intense during the last 30 years, even including the Monica Lewinsky scandal during Bill Clinton’s tenure as president.

The definition that comes up on Google is “In politics and religion, a moderate is an individual who is not extreme, partisan, nor radical. In recent years, the term political moderates has gained traction as a buzzword. The existence of the ideal moderate is disputed because of a lack of a moderate political ideology.”

Essentially, a true political moderate is someone who does not hold to a party line, who may disagree with aspects of the GOP while supporting other agendas. The moderate may agree with portions of the Democratic party’s purposes while opposing others.

As most of us are well aware, the intensity of the recent election and the actions of the current administration have raised tensions on virtually all major matters to unseen heights. Social media users unfriend people for their political views now more than ever. Twitter, that bastion of Trump interaction, buzzes constantly, with more and more bans coming every day due to the vehemence of people on both sides of issues.

The concept of us versus them, Red or Blue, and that only one side is correct are all partly at fault for the challenges political moderates face. If I, who has many conservative Republican family members, were to say something in support of Obamacare, I would likely receive backlash from those comments. On the other hand, were I to come out on social media in support of Donald Trump’s immigration freeze, I would likely have many of my liberal friends comment angrily or unfriend me.

As such, political moderates who voice opinions tend to lose out either way. The current political climate is decidedly unfriendly towards anyone who has not picked a side in the ongoing debates. Even criticizing a clear blunder by one party or another will bring the wrath of half of America down on a someone’s head.
From The Inquistor; February 16, 2017 br br By Jo... (show quote)


Good post...
Us moderates are an endangered species

| Reply
Apr 14, 2019 10:51:21   #
debeda (a regular here)
 
slatten49 wrote:
Fair enough, Debeda. Yet, an excerpt from the 2nd paragraph of the above article seems to contradict your assertion that "it began with the current administration"....

"...While the Republican/Democrat rivalry has existed for well over a century, tensions between supporters of the two sides have rarely been so intense during the last 30 years, even including the Monica Lewinsky scandal during Bill Clinton’s tenure as president."
Fair enough, Debeda. Yet, an excerpt from the 2nd... (show quote)


Yes but further down it does indeed state and infer never so bad until this administration.

| Reply
Apr 14, 2019 11:08:55   #
slatten49 (a regular here)
 
debeda wrote:
Yes but further down it does indeed state and infer never so bad until this administration.

Well, I did preface my response with "Fair enough."

| Reply
Apr 14, 2019 11:09:55   #
debeda (a regular here)
 
slatten49 wrote:
Well, I did preface my response with "Fair enough."


Fair enough

| Reply
Apr 14, 2019 11:14:47   #
slatten49 (a regular here)
 
debeda wrote:
Fair enough

Whew I managed to dodge yet another bullet.

| Reply
Page: 1 2 3 next>>
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
OnePoliticalPlaza.com - Forum
Copyright 2012-2019 IDF International Technologies, Inc.