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Feb 9, 2019 19:53:02   #
Coos Bay Tom (a regular here)
 
Out on the rocky western coast of Coos Bay by the sea-At a place that was known as the Heceta banks men were fishing on boats of steel. They were after their catch with massive nets steel doors both open wide-Draggin a trap across the oceans back-on the fish both day and night. A southerly wind had begun to blow but it seemed it would be alright-so they set the gear for another tow and they fished into the night. 'Bout that time the wind picked up and blew as hard as it could--Starboard cable hummed like a hive full of bees then snapped like it was made of wood--It was a sudden and the boat wheeled over being pulled down by the net--Skipper yelled out "cut the other side-If you don't we'll all be dead"--A crewman reached out and touched it with the cutters and it snapped it was so tight and that big boat shook off a fisherman when it pitched and bobbed up right--They wheeled her hard over and picked up their man but they took one over the side-Next they nosed her down and blew out the windows--They were in for a hell of a ride--Electric sparks were flyin 'round the cabin and they lost their radio and lights so the skipper wired a flashlight to the compass and they ran home through the night. Two men went below to start up the pump they were in such a terrible plight-- Floorboards floatin 'round the engine room but neither one gave in to fright. ----What do you do when the Dover shifts-full of water in a sixty mile blow--When the bin boards crack and the vessel lists you don't know which way she'll roll---Fightin' the sea like a wounded whale-The steam in the bilge could make the engine fail--Every part of the boat seemed to vibrate and shake-- knocked the packing loose thought the shaft would break--Scannin' the coastline like a hungry dog they spotted the Bar comin' out of the fog--The whole thing stood up like a thousand knives--couldn't find a slot --no relief in sight--They had come so far just to turn her back and that was all that the skipper could hack--"Lets hit the beach it won't be our fault--We can't wind up in a concrete vault--The men yelled back "We're staying on this boat !" They refused to give up that's all she wrote--They wheeled her back and nearly smacked the wall--every hair on their heads was standing tall--Spun the wheel to the left -fought it back to the right--They just plain lucked out on that windblown night

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Feb 9, 2019 20:25:14   #
EN Submarine Qualified
 
Coos Bay Tom wrote:
Out on the rocky western coast of Coos Bay by the sea-At a place that was known as the Heceta banks men were fishing on boats of steel. They were after their catch with massive nets steel doors both open wide-Draggin a trap across the oceans back-on the fish both day and night. A southerly wind had begun to blow but it seemed it would be alright-so they set the gear for another tow and they fished into the night. 'Bout that time the wind picked up and blew as hard as it could--Starboard cable hummed like a hive full of bees then snapped like it was made of wood--It was a sudden and the boat wheeled over being pulled down by the net--Skipper yelled out "cut the other side-If you don't we'll all be dead"--A crewman reached out and touched it with the cutters and it snapped it was so tight and that big boat shook off a fisherman when it pitched and bobbed up right--They wheeled her hard over and picked up their man but they took one over the side-Next they nosed her down and blew out the windows--They were in for a hell of a ride--Electric sparks were flyin 'round the cabin and they lost their radio and lights so the skipper wired a flashlight to the compass and they ran home through the night. Two men went below to start up the pump they were in such a terrible plight-- Floorboards floatin 'round the engine room but neither one gave in to fright. ----What do you do when the Dover shifts-full of water in a sixty mile blow--When the bin boards crack and the vessel lists you don't know which way she'll roll---Fightin' the sea like a wounded whale-The steam in the bilge could make the engine fail--Every part of the boat seemed to vibrate and shake-- knocked the packing loose thought the shaft would break--Scannin' the coastline like a hungry dog they spotted the Bar comin' out of the fog--The whole thing stood up like a thousand knives--couldn't find a slot --no relief in sight--They had come so far just to turn her back and that was all that the skipper could hack--"Lets hit the beach it won't be our fault--We can't wind up in a concrete vault--The men yelled back "We're staying on this boat !" They refused to give up that's all she wrote--They wheeled her back and nearly smacked the wall--every hair on their heads was standing tall--Spun the wheel to the left -fought it back to the right--They just plain lucked out on that windblown night
Out on the rocky western coast of Coos Bay by the ... (show quote)


Darned near seasick. Good story though.

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Feb 9, 2019 21:09:41   #
Don G. Dinsdale
 
Good Story Thanks... I Road The USS Lexington (CVA-16) Around The Horn, I'm Now A Shell-Back (This All Happened 60 Years Ago) [aprox], The 'Lex' Is An Essex Class Carrier, Refitted To Fight In Korea, I Join The Ship In Japan In '61 Anyway, Back To Horn, The Sea Was So Piss-Off In Smashed The #2 Elevader Doors, The Bosens' Had To Use Timber And Other Tricks To Keep The Door Semi-Water Titit, We Had '6 to 18' Inc. of Water On The Hanger Dect... Green/Blue/Gray Water Was Comming Over The Bow Onto The Flight Deck (That's 60 Feet High)... Don D.






~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Coos Bay Tom wrote:
Out on the rocky western coast of Coos Bay by the sea-At a place that was known as the Heceta banks men were fishing on boats of steel. They were after their catch with massive nets steel doors both open wide-Draggin a trap across the oceans back-on the fish both day and night. A southerly wind had begun to blow but it seemed it would be alright-so they set the gear for another tow and they fished into the night. 'Bout that time the wind picked up and blew as hard as it could--Starboard cable hummed like a hive full of bees then snapped like it was made of wood--It was a sudden and the boat wheeled over being pulled down by the net--Skipper yelled out "cut the other side-If you don't we'll all be dead"--A crewman reached out and touched it with the cutters and it snapped it was so tight and that big boat shook off a fisherman when it pitched and bobbed up right--They wheeled her hard over and picked up their man but they took one over the side-Next they nosed her down and blew out the windows--They were in for a hell of a ride--Electric sparks were flyin 'round the cabin and they lost their radio and lights so the skipper wired a flashlight to the compass and they ran home through the night. Two men went below to start up the pump they were in such a terrible plight-- Floorboards floatin 'round the engine room but neither one gave in to fright. ----What do you do when the Dover shifts-full of water in a sixty mile blow--When the bin boards crack and the vessel lists you don't know which way she'll roll---Fightin' the sea like a wounded whale-The steam in the bilge could make the engine fail--Every part of the boat seemed to vibrate and shake-- knocked the packing loose thought the shaft would break--Scannin' the coastline like a hungry dog they spotted the Bar comin' out of the fog--The whole thing stood up like a thousand knives--couldn't find a slot --no relief in sight--They had come so far just to turn her back and that was all that the skipper could hack--"Lets hit the beach it won't be our fault--We can't wind up in a concrete vault--The men yelled back "We're staying on this boat !" They refused to give up that's all she wrote--They wheeled her back and nearly smacked the wall--every hair on their heads was standing tall--Spun the wheel to the left -fought it back to the right--They just plain lucked out on that windblown night
Out on the rocky western coast of Coos Bay by the ... (show quote)

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Feb 9, 2019 21:24:15   #
EN Submarine Qualified
 
Don G. Dinsdale wrote:
Good Story Thanks... I Rode The USS Lexington (CVA-16) Around The Horn, I'm Now A Shell-Back (This All Happened 60 Years Ago) [approx], The 'Lex' Is An Essex Class Carrier, Refitted To fight In Korea. I joined The Ship In Japan In '61 Anyway, back To Horn, The sea Was So Piss-Off It Smashed The #2 Elevator doors, The Bosuns had To use timber And other tricks To keep The Door Semi-Water Tight. We Had '6" to 18" in of water On The hanger Deck... Green/Blue/Gray Water Was Coming Over The Bow Onto The Flight Deck (That's 60 Feet High)... Don D.

Another good story. never did the Horn. Did cross the equator but not on a Navy ship so that doesn't count for Shellback. Am Golden Dragon and Blue Nose however.






~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Good Story Thanks... I Rode The USS Lexington (CV... (show quote)

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Feb 9, 2019 21:31:01   #
teabag09 (a regular here)
 
Really good story. In 68 with a load full of 600 tons of ammo, rockets and bombs destined for Nam we hit a typhon on the way to Okinawa on a 465' hermaphrodite WW1 freighter. USMSTS Madacat. We stayed in that storm for 6 days, sailing into it and were pushed back almost 400 miles. We took green water often on the upper house in 65' seas. Rolling 25 to 30*, strapped in our racks and walking on the walls. Cold cuts for 6 days and not a one seasick soul until we came out of it. The sea was slick as a mirror, we couldn't walk without hanging on to something. EVERYONE was feeding the fish and for a day or two sleep was impossible. I've never been seasick since. Mike
Don G. Dinsdale wrote:
Good Story Thanks... I Road The USS Lexington (CVA-16) Around The Horn, I'm Now A Shell-Back (This All Happened 60 Years Ago) [aprox], The 'Lex' Is An Essex Class Carrier, Refitted To Fight In Korea, I Join The Ship In Japan In '61 Anyway, Back To Horn, The Sea Was So Piss-Off In Smashed The #2 Elevader Doors, The Bosens' Had To Use Timber And Other Tricks To Keep The Door Semi-Water Titit, We Had '6 to 18' Inc. of Water On The Hanger Dect... Green/Blue/Gray Water Was Comming Over The Bow Onto The Flight Deck (That's 60 Feet High)... Don D.






~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Good Story Thanks... I Road The USS Lexington (CV... (show quote)

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Feb 9, 2019 22:26:46   #
EN Submarine Qualified
 
teabag09 wrote:
Really good story. In 68 with a load full of 600 tons of ammo, rockets and bombs destined for Nam we hit a typhon on the way to Okinawa on a 465' hermaphrodite WW1 freighter. USMSTS Madacat. We stayed in that storm for 6 days, sailing into it and were pushed back almost 400 miles. We took green water often on the upper house in 65' seas. Rolling 25 to 30*, strapped in our racks and walking on the walls. Cold cuts for 6 days and not a one seasick soul until we came out of it. The sea was slick as a mirror, we couldn't walk without hanging on to something. EVERYONE was feeding the fish and for a day or two sleep was impossible. I've never been seasick since. Mike
Really good story. In 68 with a load full of 600 t... (show quote)


Rode an AKA for 4 years through whatever there was and never got seasick. Also made any number of landing craft boat rides and beach assaults and still never got seasick even with everyone else chumming the fish.
The submarine was a great ride. Unfortunately for some, it was a diesel electric boat so we had to charge batteries daily either at snorkel depth or on the surface so lots got to make a fast trip to the head or use their #10 tin can. We lost a bit of superstructure and suffered some pretty good dents in what didn't go over the side. Still never got seasick in over 6 years of sea duty. Also had a cruise on a civilian liner which didn't seem to be moving. Almost no roll or pitch.

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Feb 10, 2019 07:14:05   #
Coos Bay Tom (a regular here)
 
Sailors are tough I don't care what anybody says. The truth is -The ocean is tougher. I went through some good ones commercial fishing. I once found myself with my shins up against the bullworks grasping a slabilizer chain and looking at the prop and the rudder as we layed on our side in the trough with the wind blowing about 50. We uprighted. Me with my arm sprained and swollen and the boat owner with a broken ankle out of the ordeal. We had to run several hours that way back home. That skipper was unsafe and later that summer he put his boat on the rocks,

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Feb 10, 2019 11:47:59   #
badbobby (a regular here)
 
Coos Bay Tom wrote:
Out on the rocky western coast of Coos Bay by the sea-At a place that was known as the Heceta banks men were fishing on boats of steel. They were after their catch with massive nets steel doors both open wide-Draggin a trap across the oceans back-on the fish both day and night. A southerly wind had begun to blow but it seemed it would be alright-so they set the gear for another tow and they fished into the night. 'Bout that time the wind picked up and blew as hard as it could--Starboard cable hummed like a hive full of bees then snapped like it was made of wood--It was a sudden and the boat wheeled over being pulled down by the net--Skipper yelled out "cut the other side-If you don't we'll all be dead"--A crewman reached out and touched it with the cutters and it snapped it was so tight and that big boat shook off a fisherman when it pitched and bobbed up right--They wheeled her hard over and picked up their man but they took one over the side-Next they nosed her down and blew out the windows--They were in for a hell of a ride--Electric sparks were flyin 'round the cabin and they lost their radio and lights so the skipper wired a flashlight to the compass and they ran home through the night. Two men went below to start up the pump they were in such a terrible plight-- Floorboards floatin 'round the engine room but neither one gave in to fright. ----What do you do when the Dover shifts-full of water in a sixty mile blow--When the bin boards crack and the vessel lists you don't know which way she'll roll---Fightin' the sea like a wounded whale-The steam in the bilge could make the engine fail--Every part of the boat seemed to vibrate and shake-- knocked the packing loose thought the shaft would break--Scannin' the coastline like a hungry dog they spotted the Bar comin' out of the fog--The whole thing stood up like a thousand knives--couldn't find a slot --no relief in sight--They had come so far just to turn her back and that was all that the skipper could hack--"Lets hit the beach it won't be our fault--We can't wind up in a concrete vault--The men yelled back "We're staying on this boat !" They refused to give up that's all she wrote--They wheeled her back and nearly smacked the wall--every hair on their heads was standing tall--Spun the wheel to the left -fought it back to the right--They just plain lucked out on that windblown night
Out on the rocky western coast of Coos Bay by the ... (show quote)

reminds me of riding out a typhoon at Okinawa on a hundred and five foot yard tug boat
good story

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Feb 10, 2019 14:43:23   #
Carlos
 
Very good, once I started reading I couldn't stop. Exciting and very picturesque. True sailors, I can understand that story,was in the coast guard and ran into some beauties. Joined seventy years ago on
Valentine's Day. I was just seventeen.

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Feb 10, 2019 15:59:22   #
debeda (a regular here)
 
Coos Bay Tom wrote:
Out on the rocky western coast of Coos Bay by the sea-At a place that was known as the Heceta banks men were fishing on boats of steel. They were after their catch with massive nets steel doors both open wide-Draggin a trap across the oceans back-on the fish both day and night. A southerly wind had begun to blow but it seemed it would be alright-so they set the gear for another tow and they fished into the night. 'Bout that time the wind picked up and blew as hard as it could--Starboard cable hummed like a hive full of bees then snapped like it was made of wood--It was a sudden and the boat wheeled over being pulled down by the net--Skipper yelled out "cut the other side-If you don't we'll all be dead"--A crewman reached out and touched it with the cutters and it snapped it was so tight and that big boat shook off a fisherman when it pitched and bobbed up right--They wheeled her hard over and picked up their man but they took one over the side-Next they nosed her down and blew out the windows--They were in for a hell of a ride--Electric sparks were flyin 'round the cabin and they lost their radio and lights so the skipper wired a flashlight to the compass and they ran home through the night. Two men went below to start up the pump they were in such a terrible plight-- Floorboards floatin 'round the engine room but neither one gave in to fright. ----What do you do when the Dover shifts-full of water in a sixty mile blow--When the bin boards crack and the vessel lists you don't know which way she'll roll---Fightin' the sea like a wounded whale-The steam in the bilge could make the engine fail--Every part of the boat seemed to vibrate and shake-- knocked the packing loose thought the shaft would break--Scannin' the coastline like a hungry dog they spotted the Bar comin' out of the fog--The whole thing stood up like a thousand knives--couldn't find a slot --no relief in sight--They had come so far just to turn her back and that was all that the skipper could hack--"Lets hit the beach it won't be our fault--We can't wind up in a concrete vault--The men yelled back "We're staying on this boat !" They refused to give up that's all she wrote--They wheeled her back and nearly smacked the wall--every hair on their heads was standing tall--Spun the wheel to the left -fought it back to the right--They just plain lucked out on that windblown night
Out on the rocky western coast of Coos Bay by the ... (show quote)


Good poem!! The up side to the Edmund Fitzgerald one

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Feb 10, 2019 18:52:59   #
Coos Bay Tom (a regular here)
 
Carlos wrote:
Very good, once I started reading I couldn't stop. Exciting and very picturesque. True sailors, I can understand that story,was in the coast guard and ran into some beauties. Joined seventy years ago on
Valentine's Day. I was just seventeen.


My son is a US Navy sea cadet- He will bunk with the Coast guard in Charleston for 10 days this spring break. He'll work with them and eat with them. He wants to be an engineer in the Coast Guard when He graduates. He should make Chief by then.

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Feb 10, 2019 18:57:57   #
Coos Bay Tom (a regular here)
 
debeda wrote:
Good poem!! The up side to the Edmund Fitzgerald one


I sent it to my cousin Terri Clark hoping she would put it to music-- oh well she didn't like my other song--One eyed uncle Marvin--

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Feb 10, 2019 18:59:28   #
Coos Bay Tom (a regular here)
 
badbobby wrote:
reminds me of riding out a typhoon at Okinawa on a hundred and five foot yard tug boat
good story


I hear they have crazy weather there and the China sea.

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Feb 10, 2019 19:01:15   #
Coos Bay Tom (a regular here)
 
Don G. Dinsdale wrote:
Good Story Thanks... I Road The USS Lexington (CVA-16) Around The Horn, I'm Now A Shell-Back (This All Happened 60 Years Ago) [aprox], The 'Lex' Is An Essex Class Carrier, Refitted To Fight In Korea, I Join The Ship In Japan In '61 Anyway, Back To Horn, The Sea Was So Piss-Off In Smashed The #2 Elevader Doors, The Bosens' Had To Use Timber And Other Tricks To Keep The Door Semi-Water Titit, We Had '6 to 18' Inc. of Water On The Hanger Dect... Green/Blue/Gray Water Was Comming Over The Bow Onto The Flight Deck (That's 60 Feet High)... Don D.






~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Good Story Thanks... I Road The USS Lexington (CV... (show quote)
I can't imagine-- A boat gets pretty small sometimes



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Feb 10, 2019 19:02:08   #
Coos Bay Tom (a regular here)
 
EN Submarine Qualified wrote:
Rode an AKA for 4 years through whatever there was and never got seasick. Also made any number of landing craft boat rides and beach assaults and still never got seasick even with everyone else chumming the fish.
The submarine was a great ride. Unfortunately for some, it was a diesel electric boat so we had to charge batteries daily either at snorkel depth or on the surface so lots got to make a fast trip to the head or use their #10 tin can. We lost a bit of superstructure and suffered some pretty good dents in what didn't go over the side. Still never got seasick in over 6 years of sea duty. Also had a cruise on a civilian liner which didn't seem to be moving. Almost no roll or pitch.
Rode an AKA for 4 years through whatever there was... (show quote)



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