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A very personal story about the reality of late term abortion
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Feb 8, 2019 11:05:41   #
Kevyn (a regular here)
 
This is written By Jennifer Gorman, it is a very personal and tragic series of events that clearly explain why the laws in New York and Virginia are necessary to protect women from religious zealots.

Here’s What I Want Donald Trump And Everyone Else To Know About My 'Late-Term Abortion'
I want you to have a face and a story attached to what you think you know about a decision like mine.
I spent the first half of 2015 pregnant and then I had a “late-term abortion.”
My husband and I decided early that year to try to start a family. I succeeded almost immediately in getting pregnant. There was obviously a healthy mix of excitement and terror. While it happened a little quicker than we anticipated, we wanted our baby.
As the months went on I consumed books about pregnancy and the first year of parenthood. I took my vitamins, I ate well, and I barely even missed my former creature comforts like wine and soft cheeses. We did the genetic testing and everything looked great. We learned we were having a girl. We started our baby registry and had chosen her name. It was shaping up to be a typical first pregnancy, right down to the occasional panic attack about our changing reality.
On June 18, 2015, we were scheduled for our 21-week ultrasound. I remember the date because it was our anniversary and we thought it would be a fun way to kick off our weekend together. As the ultrasound wore on the tech became increasingly less chatty and more serious, until finally she left the room with a picture she printed from the ultrasound machine. She was gone for what felt like an excruciatingly long time. When she finally returned, she informed us the only information she was allowed to give was that a high-risk OBGYN would be contacting us soon and we needed to see her as soon as possible. Shortly after our ill-fated ultrasound, we received a call from the high-risk OBGYN and scheduled an appointment for the following week.
A few days later we once again found ourselves in an ultrasound room with a very serious technician. Once again, after doing his due diligence, the tech quietly left the room with a print out in hand and, again, he did not return for what felt like a very long while. However, this time, when he came back, he was accompanied by the high-risk OBGYN who escorted my husband and me to a small conference room.
Once seated around a small round table, the doctor wasted no time getting to the point. She informed us that our baby had a severe developmental abnormality, Spina Bifida, in the cervical region of the spine. Her spinal cord was completely exposed just below her skull. I remember immediately starting to cry and my ears started to ring so loudly I could barely hear her as she continued to speak. I struggled to listen as she explained in detail what we were facing.
The doctor told us that it was unlikely that our baby would survive and should she make it to delivery and live, she would be paralyzed from the neck down. She would be confined to a wheelchair and would likely be permanently attached to a colostomy bag and feeding tube; she would be profoundly mentally disabled. The doctor advised us that our best course of action, in her medical opinion, was a therapeutic abortion, and with heavy hearts we agreed.
We left the office with a list of more doctors to call. These were the doctors who could perform my “late-term abortion” in the state of Florida. We called from my car, while still in the parking garage of the medical building The clinic in St. Petersburg was unable to accommodate us and the next one on the very short list of available doctors was in Fort Lauderdale, three hours from our home. We called them and were told we could be seen the following day.
The next morning we found ourselves in a very crowded clinic in Fort Lauderdale. We paid extra for a private waiting room, and we were quickly ushered into it so the worst experience of my life wouldn’t be on display.
And so it began. From our waiting room, I emailed our family and explained what was happening. My eyes welled with tears until the screen of my laptop was a blur. Then the staff brought me into a room for one final ultrasound and silent tears fell from my eyes as I heard her heartbeat for the last time. I continued to cry as the doctor rubbed an antiseptic on my stomach before injecting a needle through my pregnant belly and into my daughter’s heart to stop its beating. I continued to cry all night, in an unfamiliar hotel room, as I waited for morning to come when the D & C (dilation and curettage) would be completed and my baby would be surgically removed from my womb. The next day, in the operating room, I cried as they put me under. And when it was done, I awoke to the sound of my own sobs. I cried everyday after for six months.
Every last tear I cried came from a place of grief. Not one of those tears ever came from a place of guilt. I made the only decision I could. I made the only decision that was right for me, right for my family, and right for my daughter. It is my belief, if she did have a soul, the only kind and merciful thing to do was to release her from a body that would never, ever work.
Deciding to undergo a “late-term abortion” is something I never thought I would have to do, and it’s something I would never wish upon anyone else. It is something I think about every day of my life, and I can’t imagine ever not thinking about it. But, as devastating as making that decision was ― and as terrifying and heart-wrenching as actually going through the experience was ― I am grateful I live in a country where, at least for now, a “late-term abortion” was a legal option for me.
I am not in the habit of writing about my personal life on social media and especially not on a hugely-read publication like HuffPost. While I’ve often made my opinion known on the topic of abortion in the past, I’ve avoided the personal reasons for my belief. Today I decided to share my story because the next time the president of the United States, a politician, a talking head on TV, a religious leader, your friends or family, or yourself either alludes to or overtly calls women like me at best heartless or at worst murderers, I would like you to have a face, a name, and a story attached to that accusation. Perhaps armed with that knowledge, you’ll think twice before agreeing with them.

| Reply
Feb 8, 2019 11:52:41   #
slatten49 (a regular here)
 
Kevyn wrote:
This is written By Jennifer Gorman, it is a very personal and tragic series of events that clearly explain why the laws in New York and Virginia are necessary to protect women from religious zealots.

Here’s What I Want Donald Trump And Everyone Else To Know About My 'Late-Term Abortion'
I want you to have a face and a story attached to what you think you know about a decision like mine.
I spent the first half of 2015 pregnant and then I had a “late-term abortion.”
My husband and I decided early that year to try to start a family. I succeeded almost immediately in getting pregnant. There was obviously a healthy mix of excitement and terror. While it happened a little quicker than we anticipated, we wanted our baby.
As the months went on I consumed books about pregnancy and the first year of parenthood. I took my vitamins, I ate well, and I barely even missed my former creature comforts like wine and soft cheeses. We did the genetic testing and everything looked great. We learned we were having a girl. We started our baby registry and had chosen her name. It was shaping up to be a typical first pregnancy, right down to the occasional panic attack about our changing reality.
On June 18, 2015, we were scheduled for our 21-week ultrasound. I remember the date because it was our anniversary and we thought it would be a fun way to kick off our weekend together. As the ultrasound wore on the tech became increasingly less chatty and more serious, until finally she left the room with a picture she printed from the ultrasound machine. She was gone for what felt like an excruciatingly long time. When she finally returned, she informed us the only information she was allowed to give was that a high-risk OBGYN would be contacting us soon and we needed to see her as soon as possible. Shortly after our ill-fated ultrasound, we received a call from the high-risk OBGYN and scheduled an appointment for the following week.
A few days later we once again found ourselves in an ultrasound room with a very serious technician. Once again, after doing his due diligence, the tech quietly left the room with a print out in hand and, again, he did not return for what felt like a very long while. However, this time, when he came back, he was accompanied by the high-risk OBGYN who escorted my husband and me to a small conference room.
Once seated around a small round table, the doctor wasted no time getting to the point. She informed us that our baby had a severe developmental abnormality, Spina Bifida, in the cervical region of the spine. Her spinal cord was completely exposed just below her skull. I remember immediately starting to cry and my ears started to ring so loudly I could barely hear her as she continued to speak. I struggled to listen as she explained in detail what we were facing.
The doctor told us that it was unlikely that our baby would survive and should she make it to delivery and live, she would be paralyzed from the neck down. She would be confined to a wheelchair and would likely be permanently attached to a colostomy bag and feeding tube; she would be profoundly mentally disabled. The doctor advised us that our best course of action, in her medical opinion, was a therapeutic abortion, and with heavy hearts we agreed.
We left the office with a list of more doctors to call. These were the doctors who could perform my “late-term abortion” in the state of Florida. We called from my car, while still in the parking garage of the medical building The clinic in St. Petersburg was unable to accommodate us and the next one on the very short list of available doctors was in Fort Lauderdale, three hours from our home. We called them and were told we could be seen the following day.
The next morning we found ourselves in a very crowded clinic in Fort Lauderdale. We paid extra for a private waiting room, and we were quickly ushered into it so the worst experience of my life wouldn’t be on display.
And so it began. From our waiting room, I emailed our family and explained what was happening. My eyes welled with tears until the screen of my laptop was a blur. Then the staff brought me into a room for one final ultrasound and silent tears fell from my eyes as I heard her heartbeat for the last time. I continued to cry as the doctor rubbed an antiseptic on my stomach before injecting a needle through my pregnant belly and into my daughter’s heart to stop its beating. I continued to cry all night, in an unfamiliar hotel room, as I waited for morning to come when the D & C (dilation and curettage) would be completed and my baby would be surgically removed from my womb. The next day, in the operating room, I cried as they put me under. And when it was done, I awoke to the sound of my own sobs. I cried everyday after for six months.
Every last tear I cried came from a place of grief. Not one of those tears ever came from a place of guilt. I made the only decision I could. I made the only decision that was right for me, right for my family, and right for my daughter. It is my belief, if she did have a soul, the only kind and merciful thing to do was to release her from a body that would never, ever work.
Deciding to undergo a “late-term abortion” is something I never thought I would have to do, and it’s something I would never wish upon anyone else. It is something I think about every day of my life, and I can’t imagine ever not thinking about it. But, as devastating as making that decision was ― and as terrifying and heart-wrenching as actually going through the experience was ― I am grateful I live in a country where, at least for now, a “late-term abortion” was a legal option for me.
I am not in the habit of writing about my personal life on social media and especially not on a hugely-read publication like HuffPost. While I’ve often made my opinion known on the topic of abortion in the past, I’ve avoided the personal reasons for my belief. Today I decided to share my story because the next time the president of the United States, a politician, a talking head on TV, a religious leader, your friends or family, or yourself either alludes to or overtly calls women like me at best heartless or at worst murderers, I would like you to have a face, a name, and a story attached to that accusation. Perhaps armed with that knowledge, you’ll think twice before agreeing with them.
This is written By Jennifer Gorman, it is a very p... (show quote)

Thanks for posting, Kevyn. Regardless of ones stance on late-term abortions, Mrs. Gorman's and other voices should continue to be heard. Based on the above story, I believe that she gave proper & heart-felt deliberative thought before reaching her painful decision.

| Reply
Feb 8, 2019 11:58:50   #
Kevyn (a regular here)
 
slatten49 wrote:
Thanks for sharing, Kevyn. Regardless of ones stance on late-term abortions, Mrs. Gorman's and other voices should continue to be heard. Based on the above, I believe that she gave proper deliberation and thought before reaching her decision.


Of course she did, to present these law changes that are designed to protect women like her and the physicians who care for them from prosicution by religious zealots as somehow legalizing infanticide is inexcusable.

| Reply
Feb 8, 2019 12:06:53   #
Rose42 (a regular here)
 
Sure they should be heard so people can see that at their core these decisions are completely selfish. This isn't something she had to do. An unborn child is not like an animal to be put down to end its suffering.

I know two beautiful young children with spina bifida. Their parents knew they would be born that way. They will never be like other children but they have brought love and joy into their parents lives and others and taught them many lessons. I know numerous children and young people who have brought joy into people's lives that women like the author of this piece would not have let live. These children know they are different - two are in a wheelchair - but they are happy.

The left wants to marginalize and cheapen human life. If being against that makes one a zealot then I am happy to be a zealot.

| Reply
Feb 8, 2019 13:07:43   #
Kazudy (a regular here)
 
Kevyn wrote:
This is written By Jennifer Gorman, it is a very personal and tragic series of events that clearly explain why the laws in New York and Virginia are necessary to protect women from religious zealots.

Here’s What I Want Donald Trump And Everyone Else To Know About My 'Late-Term Abortion'
I want you to have a face and a story attached to what you think you know about a decision like mine.
I spent the first half of 2015 pregnant and then I had a “late-term abortion.”
My husband and I decided early that year to try to start a family. I succeeded almost immediately in getting pregnant. There was obviously a healthy mix of excitement and terror. While it happened a little quicker than we anticipated, we wanted our baby.
As the months went on I consumed books about pregnancy and the first year of parenthood. I took my vitamins, I ate well, and I barely even missed my former creature comforts like wine and soft cheeses. We did the genetic testing and everything looked great. We learned we were having a girl. We started our baby registry and had chosen her name. It was shaping up to be a typical first pregnancy, right down to the occasional panic attack about our changing reality.
On June 18, 2015, we were scheduled for our 21-week ultrasound. I remember the date because it was our anniversary and we thought it would be a fun way to kick off our weekend together. As the ultrasound wore on the tech became increasingly less chatty and more serious, until finally she left the room with a picture she printed from the ultrasound machine. She was gone for what felt like an excruciatingly long time. When she finally returned, she informed us the only information she was allowed to give was that a high-risk OBGYN would be contacting us soon and we needed to see her as soon as possible. Shortly after our ill-fated ultrasound, we received a call from the high-risk OBGYN and scheduled an appointment for the following week.
A few days later we once again found ourselves in an ultrasound room with a very serious technician. Once again, after doing his due diligence, the tech quietly left the room with a print out in hand and, again, he did not return for what felt like a very long while. However, this time, when he came back, he was accompanied by the high-risk OBGYN who escorted my husband and me to a small conference room.
Once seated around a small round table, the doctor wasted no time getting to the point. She informed us that our baby had a severe developmental abnormality, Spina Bifida, in the cervical region of the spine. Her spinal cord was completely exposed just below her skull. I remember immediately starting to cry and my ears started to ring so loudly I could barely hear her as she continued to speak. I struggled to listen as she explained in detail what we were facing.
The doctor told us that it was unlikely that our baby would survive and should she make it to delivery and live, she would be paralyzed from the neck down. She would be confined to a wheelchair and would likely be permanently attached to a colostomy bag and feeding tube; she would be profoundly mentally disabled. The doctor advised us that our best course of action, in her medical opinion, was a therapeutic abortion, and with heavy hearts we agreed.
We left the office with a list of more doctors to call. These were the doctors who could perform my “late-term abortion” in the state of Florida. We called from my car, while still in the parking garage of the medical building The clinic in St. Petersburg was unable to accommodate us and the next one on the very short list of available doctors was in Fort Lauderdale, three hours from our home. We called them and were told we could be seen the following day.
The next morning we found ourselves in a very crowded clinic in Fort Lauderdale. We paid extra for a private waiting room, and we were quickly ushered into it so the worst experience of my life wouldn’t be on display.
And so it began. From our waiting room, I emailed our family and explained what was happening. My eyes welled with tears until the screen of my laptop was a blur. Then the staff brought me into a room for one final ultrasound and silent tears fell from my eyes as I heard her heartbeat for the last time. I continued to cry as the doctor rubbed an antiseptic on my stomach before injecting a needle through my pregnant belly and into my daughter’s heart to stop its beating. I continued to cry all night, in an unfamiliar hotel room, as I waited for morning to come when the D & C (dilation and curettage) would be completed and my baby would be surgically removed from my womb. The next day, in the operating room, I cried as they put me under. And when it was done, I awoke to the sound of my own sobs. I cried everyday after for six months.
Every last tear I cried came from a place of grief. Not one of those tears ever came from a place of guilt. I made the only decision I could. I made the only decision that was right for me, right for my family, and right for my daughter. It is my belief, if she did have a soul, the only kind and merciful thing to do was to release her from a body that would never, ever work.
Deciding to undergo a “late-term abortion” is something I never thought I would have to do, and it’s something I would never wish upon anyone else. It is something I think about every day of my life, and I can’t imagine ever not thinking about it. But, as devastating as making that decision was ― and as terrifying and heart-wrenching as actually going through the experience was ― I am grateful I live in a country where, at least for now, a “late-term abortion” was a legal option for me.
I am not in the habit of writing about my personal life on social media and especially not on a hugely-read publication like HuffPost. While I’ve often made my opinion known on the topic of abortion in the past, I’ve avoided the personal reasons for my belief. Today I decided to share my story because the next time the president of the United States, a politician, a talking head on TV, a religious leader, your friends or family, or yourself either alludes to or overtly calls women like me at best heartless or at worst murderers, I would like you to have a face, a name, and a story attached to that accusation. Perhaps armed with that knowledge, you’ll think twice before agreeing with them.
This is written By Jennifer Gorman, it is a very p... (show quote)


That IS a very sad situation, I have a grand niece that was born with spinabifidia, thou not as severe, she is in a wheelchair and that's the total of her handicap. She is a joy to her parents, her grandparent, and everybody that she comes in contact with. I can see and understand why you made that choice, not that I agree with it, but the thing is the left gives those VERY RARE probobly one, one thousand of one percent of abortions to push abortion on demand to healthy babies, because it is a inconvenience to the parents.

| Reply
Feb 8, 2019 16:36:30   #
no propaganda please (a regular here)
 
Kevyn wrote:
This is written By Jennifer Gorman, it is a very personal and tragic series of events that clearly explain why the laws in New York and Virginia are necessary to protect women from religious zealots.

Here’s What I Want Donald Trump And Everyone Else To Know About My 'Late-Term Abortion'
I want you to have a face and a story attached to what you think you know about a decision like mine.
I spent the first half of 2015 pregnant and then I had a “late-term abortion.”
My husband and I decided early that year to try to start a family. I succeeded almost immediately in getting pregnant. There was obviously a healthy mix of excitement and terror. While it happened a little quicker than we anticipated, we wanted our baby.
As the months went on I consumed books about pregnancy and the first year of parenthood. I took my vitamins, I ate well, and I barely even missed my former creature comforts like wine and soft cheeses. We did the genetic testing and everything looked great. We learned we were having a girl. We started our baby registry and had chosen her name. It was shaping up to be a typical first pregnancy, right down to the occasional panic attack about our changing reality.
On June 18, 2015, we were scheduled for our 21-week ultrasound. I remember the date because it was our anniversary and we thought it would be a fun way to kick off our weekend together. As the ultrasound wore on the tech became increasingly less chatty and more serious, until finally she left the room with a picture she printed from the ultrasound machine. She was gone for what felt like an excruciatingly long time. When she finally returned, she informed us the only information she was allowed to give was that a high-risk OBGYN would be contacting us soon and we needed to see her as soon as possible. Shortly after our ill-fated ultrasound, we received a call from the high-risk OBGYN and scheduled an appointment for the following week.
A few days later we once again found ourselves in an ultrasound room with a very serious technician. Once again, after doing his due diligence, the tech quietly left the room with a print out in hand and, again, he did not return for what felt like a very long while. However, this time, when he came back, he was accompanied by the high-risk OBGYN who escorted my husband and me to a small conference room.
Once seated around a small round table, the doctor wasted no time getting to the point. She informed us that our baby had a severe developmental abnormality, Spina Bifida, in the cervical region of the spine. Her spinal cord was completely exposed just below her skull. I remember immediately starting to cry and my ears started to ring so loudly I could barely hear her as she continued to speak. I struggled to listen as she explained in detail what we were facing.
The doctor told us that it was unlikely that our baby would survive and should she make it to delivery and live, she would be paralyzed from the neck down. She would be confined to a wheelchair and would likely be permanently attached to a colostomy bag and feeding tube; she would be profoundly mentally disabled. The doctor advised us that our best course of action, in her medical opinion, was a therapeutic abortion, and with heavy hearts we agreed.
We left the office with a list of more doctors to call. These were the doctors who could perform my “late-term abortion” in the state of Florida. We called from my car, while still in the parking garage of the medical building The clinic in St. Petersburg was unable to accommodate us and the next one on the very short list of available doctors was in Fort Lauderdale, three hours from our home. We called them and were told we could be seen the following day.
The next morning we found ourselves in a very crowded clinic in Fort Lauderdale. We paid extra for a private waiting room, and we were quickly ushered into it so the worst experience of my life wouldn’t be on display.
And so it began. From our waiting room, I emailed our family and explained what was happening. My eyes welled with tears until the screen of my laptop was a blur. Then the staff brought me into a room for one final ultrasound and silent tears fell from my eyes as I heard her heartbeat for the last time. I continued to cry as the doctor rubbed an antiseptic on my stomach before injecting a needle through my pregnant belly and into my daughter’s heart to stop its beating. I continued to cry all night, in an unfamiliar hotel room, as I waited for morning to come when the D & C (dilation and curettage) would be completed and my baby would be surgically removed from my womb. The next day, in the operating room, I cried as they put me under. And when it was done, I awoke to the sound of my own sobs. I cried everyday after for six months.
Every last tear I cried came from a place of grief. Not one of those tears ever came from a place of guilt. I made the only decision I could. I made the only decision that was right for me, right for my family, and right for my daughter. It is my belief, if she did have a soul, the only kind and merciful thing to do was to release her from a body that would never, ever work.
Deciding to undergo a “late-term abortion” is something I never thought I would have to do, and it’s something I would never wish upon anyone else. It is something I think about every day of my life, and I can’t imagine ever not thinking about it. But, as devastating as making that decision was ― and as terrifying and heart-wrenching as actually going through the experience was ― I am grateful I live in a country where, at least for now, a “late-term abortion” was a legal option for me.
I am not in the habit of writing about my personal life on social media and especially not on a hugely-read publication like HuffPost. While I’ve often made my opinion known on the topic of abortion in the past, I’ve avoided the personal reasons for my belief. Today I decided to share my story because the next time the president of the United States, a politician, a talking head on TV, a religious leader, your friends or family, or yourself either alludes to or overtly calls women like me at best heartless or at worst murderers, I would like you to have a face, a name, and a story attached to that accusation. Perhaps armed with that knowledge, you’ll think twice before agreeing with them.
This is written By Jennifer Gorman, it is a very p... (show quote)


This woman's story is heart breaking, but does not reflect the goal of planned unparenthood, which is to encourage abortion up to the time the contractions have moved the baby to presentation. As a woman who has had three miscarriages, many years ago, of course, I can relate with her anguish at the knowledge that she was carrying a baby that would never live even a halfway normal and pain free life, but would probably die at birth or shortly afterward..

| Reply
Feb 8, 2019 16:51:28   #
Rose42 (a regular here)
 
no propaganda please wrote:
This woman's story is heart breaking, but does not reflect the goal of planned unparenthood, which is to encourage abortion up to the time the contractions have moved the baby to presentation. As a woman who has had three miscarriages, many years ago, of course, I can relate with her anguish at the knowledge that she was carrying a baby that would never live even a halfway normal and pain free life, but would probably die at birth or shortly afterward..


This story is meant to elicit an emotional reaction to get more people to support late term abortions. They want people to think this is the norm. I'm sure she's going to be tormented for the rest of her life for making this decision.

But...I know several children who weren't supposed to make it. One is my brother and another a cousin.

| Reply
Feb 8, 2019 19:06:56   #
Canuckus Deploracus (a regular here)
 
Kevyn wrote:
This is written By Jennifer Gorman, it is a very personal and tragic series of events that clearly explain why the laws in New York and Virginia are necessary to protect women from religious zealots.

Here’s What I Want Donald Trump And Everyone Else To Know About My 'Late-Term Abortion'
I want you to have a face and a story attached to what you think you know about a decision like mine.
I spent the first half of 2015 pregnant and then I had a “late-term abortion.”
My husband and I decided early that year to try to start a family. I succeeded almost immediately in getting pregnant. There was obviously a healthy mix of excitement and terror. While it happened a little quicker than we anticipated, we wanted our baby.
As the months went on I consumed books about pregnancy and the first year of parenthood. I took my vitamins, I ate well, and I barely even missed my former creature comforts like wine and soft cheeses. We did the genetic testing and everything looked great. We learned we were having a girl. We started our baby registry and had chosen her name. It was shaping up to be a typical first pregnancy, right down to the occasional panic attack about our changing reality.
On June 18, 2015, we were scheduled for our 21-week ultrasound. I remember the date because it was our anniversary and we thought it would be a fun way to kick off our weekend together. As the ultrasound wore on the tech became increasingly less chatty and more serious, until finally she left the room with a picture she printed from the ultrasound machine. She was gone for what felt like an excruciatingly long time. When she finally returned, she informed us the only information she was allowed to give was that a high-risk OBGYN would be contacting us soon and we needed to see her as soon as possible. Shortly after our ill-fated ultrasound, we received a call from the high-risk OBGYN and scheduled an appointment for the following week.
A few days later we once again found ourselves in an ultrasound room with a very serious technician. Once again, after doing his due diligence, the tech quietly left the room with a print out in hand and, again, he did not return for what felt like a very long while. However, this time, when he came back, he was accompanied by the high-risk OBGYN who escorted my husband and me to a small conference room.
Once seated around a small round table, the doctor wasted no time getting to the point. She informed us that our baby had a severe developmental abnormality, Spina Bifida, in the cervical region of the spine. Her spinal cord was completely exposed just below her skull. I remember immediately starting to cry and my ears started to ring so loudly I could barely hear her as she continued to speak. I struggled to listen as she explained in detail what we were facing.
The doctor told us that it was unlikely that our baby would survive and should she make it to delivery and live, she would be paralyzed from the neck down. She would be confined to a wheelchair and would likely be permanently attached to a colostomy bag and feeding tube; she would be profoundly mentally disabled. The doctor advised us that our best course of action, in her medical opinion, was a therapeutic abortion, and with heavy hearts we agreed.
We left the office with a list of more doctors to call. These were the doctors who could perform my “late-term abortion” in the state of Florida. We called from my car, while still in the parking garage of the medical building The clinic in St. Petersburg was unable to accommodate us and the next one on the very short list of available doctors was in Fort Lauderdale, three hours from our home. We called them and were told we could be seen the following day.
The next morning we found ourselves in a very crowded clinic in Fort Lauderdale. We paid extra for a private waiting room, and we were quickly ushered into it so the worst experience of my life wouldn’t be on display.
And so it began. From our waiting room, I emailed our family and explained what was happening. My eyes welled with tears until the screen of my laptop was a blur. Then the staff brought me into a room for one final ultrasound and silent tears fell from my eyes as I heard her heartbeat for the last time. I continued to cry as the doctor rubbed an antiseptic on my stomach before injecting a needle through my pregnant belly and into my daughter’s heart to stop its beating. I continued to cry all night, in an unfamiliar hotel room, as I waited for morning to come when the D & C (dilation and curettage) would be completed and my baby would be surgically removed from my womb. The next day, in the operating room, I cried as they put me under. And when it was done, I awoke to the sound of my own sobs. I cried everyday after for six months.
Every last tear I cried came from a place of grief. Not one of those tears ever came from a place of guilt. I made the only decision I could. I made the only decision that was right for me, right for my family, and right for my daughter. It is my belief, if she did have a soul, the only kind and merciful thing to do was to release her from a body that would never, ever work.
Deciding to undergo a “late-term abortion” is something I never thought I would have to do, and it’s something I would never wish upon anyone else. It is something I think about every day of my life, and I can’t imagine ever not thinking about it. But, as devastating as making that decision was ― and as terrifying and heart-wrenching as actually going through the experience was ― I am grateful I live in a country where, at least for now, a “late-term abortion” was a legal option for me.
I am not in the habit of writing about my personal life on social media and especially not on a hugely-read publication like HuffPost. While I’ve often made my opinion known on the topic of abortion in the past, I’ve avoided the personal reasons for my belief. Today I decided to share my story because the next time the president of the United States, a politician, a talking head on TV, a religious leader, your friends or family, or yourself either alludes to or overtly calls women like me at best heartless or at worst murderers, I would like you to have a face, a name, and a story attached to that accusation. Perhaps armed with that knowledge, you’ll think twice before agreeing with them.
This is written By Jennifer Gorman, it is a very p... (show quote)


My prayers for this Poor woman and her family...
I can understand and sympathize with her decision...
Medical necessity is one of the few cases where I condone abortion...

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Feb 9, 2019 12:38:33   #
Wonttakeitanymore (a regular here)
 
The doctors also role me my child would have an IQ of 70 or less! I told them God was in control! I had 2 amniocentesis and sonograms every week! Before I found out I was pregnant I was a party animal drank a lot! I told God I would never drink again if my baby was healthy! He was able to get into any college he choose and received an 80,000 scholarship! I have never touched another drink! He is now 25 years old! Thank you Jesus!!

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Feb 9, 2019 16:45:12   #
badbobby (a regular here)
 
Canuckus Deploracus wrote:
My prayers for this Poor woman and her family...
I can understand and sympathize with her decision...
Medical necessity is one of the few cases where I condone abortion...

no argument there Canuck

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Feb 9, 2019 19:02:59   #
maryjane (a regular here)
 
Kazudy wrote:
That IS a very sad situation, I have a grand niece that was born with spinabifidia, thou not as severe, she is in a wheelchair and that's the total of her handicap. She is a joy to her parents, her grandparent, and everybody that she comes in contact with. I can see and understand why you made that choice, not that I agree with it, but the thing is the left gives those VERY RARE probobly one, one thousand of one percent of abortions to push abortion on demand to healthy babies, because it is a inconvenience to the parents.
That IS a very sad situation, I have a grand niece... (show quote)


Exactly. This is the crux of the abortion on demand anytime issue. While I would certainly grant these parents every right to the decision they made, I consider their case the exception that should never be the rule. My only question is..... can such life defining physical and mental extreme deformities only be determined late in a pregnancy or is such determination possible earlier? Unfortunately, women, themselves, have caused the great divide on abortion. Originally, there were acceptable reasons put forth for abortion being made legal, but gaining legal abortion during the first trimesterwasn't enough for some women. So women pushed and pushed for the decision on abortion to be theirs alone and the reasons became nothing more than a woman's right. So, the constant pushing led us closer and closer to abortion anytime right up to actual birthing. The problem with allowing this is the (hopefully) unintended consequence of irresponsible women waiting until the last minute to choose abortion, a decision that might be based on anything, such as a husband or boyfriend leaving during that last pregnant month, and so who knows how often ninth month abortions might be happening 10 years from now. I am a woman and support legal abortion during the first trimester, but not even then for frivolous reasons. I expect women to take responsibility for their own sexual acts and prevent themselves getting pregnant (Not counting rape...). It is one thing foir a 15 year old girl to engage in irresponsible sex, but quite another for the 22 year old. We should be doing a better job of teaching our kids, especially the girls, about sex, it's possible permanent consequences, and their responsibilities to themselves, an unwanted child, and society.

| Reply
Feb 9, 2019 22:45:07   #
Ricktloml (a regular here)
 
Rose42 wrote:
Sure they should be heard so people can see that at their core these decisions are completely selfish. This isn't something she had to do. An unborn child is not like an animal to be put down to end its suffering.

I know two beautiful young children with spina bifida. Their parents knew they would be born that way. They will never be like other children but they have brought love and joy into their parents lives and others and taught them many lessons. I know numerous children and young people who have brought joy into people's lives that women like the author of this piece would not have let live. These children know they are different - two are in a wheelchair - but they are happy.

The left wants to marginalize and cheapen human life. If being against that makes one a zealot then I am happy to be a zealot.
Sure they should be heard so people can see that a... (show quote)


I might add that less than 1% of late term abortions are for the life of the mother or the baby being non-viable. What these uncivilized leftists want is to normalize infanticide. You are right, legalized abortion HAS cheapened life, and desensitized society to the savage, barbaric practice of killing the most innocent and helpless members of society.

| Reply
Feb 10, 2019 12:37:03   #
Kazudy (a regular here)
 
maryjane wrote:
Exactly. This is the crux of the abortion on demand anytime issue. While I would certainly grant these parents every right to the decision they made, I consider their case the exception that should never be the rule. My only question is..... can such life defining physical and mental extreme deformities only be determined late in a pregnancy or is such determination possible earlier? Unfortunately, women, themselves, have caused the great divide on abortion. Originally, there were acceptable reasons put forth for abortion being made legal, but gaining legal abortion during the first trimesterwasn't enough for some women. So women pushed and pushed for the decision on abortion to be theirs alone and the reasons became nothing more than a woman's right. So, the constant pushing led us closer and closer to abortion anytime right up to actual birthing. The problem with allowing this is the (hopefully) unintended consequence of irresponsible women waiting until the last minute to choose abortion, a decision that might be based on anything, such as a husband or boyfriend leaving during that last pregnant month, and so who knows how often ninth month abortions might be happening 10 years from now. I am a woman and support legal abortion during the first trimester, but not even then for frivolous reasons. I expect women to take responsibility for their own sexual acts and prevent themselves getting pregnant (Not counting rape...). It is one thing foir a 15 year old girl to engage in irresponsible sex, but quite another for the 22 year old. We should be doing a better job of teaching our kids, especially the girls, about sex, it's possible permanent consequences, and their responsibilities to themselves, an unwanted child, and society.
Exactly. This is the crux of the abortion on dema... (show quote)

If the law was to only abort the children of rape, incest, and the example of these handicap children, Planned Parrenthood would be out of business by losing 99% of the patients.

| Reply
Feb 10, 2019 13:30:59   #
woodguru (a regular here)
 
Rose42 wrote:
Sure they should be heard so people can see that at their core these decisions are completely selfish. This isn't something she had to do. An unborn child is not like an animal to be put down to end its suffering.

I know two beautiful young children with spina bifida. Their parents knew they would be born that way. They will never be like other children but they have brought love and joy into their parents lives and others and taught them many lessons. I know numerous children and young people who have brought joy into people's lives that women like the author of this piece would not have let live. These children know they are different - two are in a wheelchair - but they are happy.

The left wants to marginalize and cheapen human life. If being against that makes one a zealot then I am happy to be a zealot.
Sure they should be heard so people can see that a... (show quote)


It's not your decision, and if this is how you feel nobody wants to hear it. Just like your religious beliefs, yours and yours alone.

Selfish? So be it

| Reply
Feb 10, 2019 13:32:43   #
woodguru (a regular here)
 
Ricktloml wrote:
I might add that less than 1% of late term abortions are for the life of the mother or the baby being non-viable. What these uncivilized leftists want is to normalize infanticide. You are right, legalized abortion HAS cheapened life, and desensitized society to the savage, barbaric practice of killing the most innocent and helpless members of society.


Abortion is what it is, and "leftists" only want to keep it the way it is, it's the right that has been systematically making it as hard as possible to get abortions.

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