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Is it un-American to knell for our Anthem?
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Aug 8, 2018 21:17:06   #
rumitoid (a regular here)
 
My simple answer: No! But it is more complicated than that. The glaring fact in that action is how it effects the family and loved ones of our fallen heroes, who died protecting this country. It appears to disgrace their ultimate sacrifice. That sort of added pain is wrong. Yet is it justified? That is not the objective of these protests, yet for many, that is how it is perceived: as an insult to the flag and our service men and women.

Kaepernick took a knee for the Anthem on the advice of a Vietnam Vet, he said it would be "more respectful." Why? It would show "complaint without being disrespectful." One is still bowing (by knelling) to the nation's sovereignty while trying to call attention to certain un-addressed possible injustices. I remember flag-burning from the 60s. I got the point but it still bothered me. An attention-getter, yeah! But at what cost?

People have sacred symbols, they just do. Attacking those in an attempt to perhaps raise awareness on certain issues is very tricky and not kind. Of course, such tactics are not meant to be kind but to deeply jar the public, thoroughly move them out of their comfort zone. Make them look again, pause, reflect, wonder, question, dig deeper. But what usually happens is a knee-jerk attack. Not saying that is necessarily wrong: we all have our cherished beliefs.

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Aug 8, 2018 21:22:10   #
Wolf counselor (a regular here)
 
rumitoid wrote:
My simple answer: No! But it is more complicated than that. The glaring fact in that action is how it effects the family and loved ones of our fallen heroes, who died protecting this country. It appears to disgrace their ultimate sacrifice. That sort of added pain is wrong. Yet is it justified? That is not the objective of these protests, yet for many, that is how it is perceived: as an insult to the flag and our service men and women.

Kaepernick took a knee for the Anthem on the advice of a Vietnam Vet, he said it would be "more respectful." Why? It would show "complaint without being disrespectful." One is still bowing (by knelling) to the nation's sovereignty while trying to call attention to certain un-addressed possible injustices. I remember flag-burning from the 60s. I got the point but it still bothered me. An attention-getter, yeah! But at what cost?

People have sacred symbols, they just do. Attacking those in an attempt to perhaps raise awareness on certain issues is very tricky and not kind. Of course, such tactics are not meant to be kind but to deeply jar the public, thoroughly move them out of their comfort zone. Make them look again, pause, reflect, wonder, question, dig deeper. But what usually happens is a knee-jerk attack. Not saying that is necessarily wrong: we all have our cherished beliefs.
My simple answer: No! But it is more complicated t... (show quote)


Congratulations.

You and this dimwit have a lot in common.



| Reply
Aug 8, 2018 21:29:13   #
Liberty Tree (a regular here)
 
rumitoid wrote:
My simple answer: No! But it is more complicated than that. The glaring fact in that action is how it effects the family and loved ones of our fallen heroes, who died protecting this country. It appears to disgrace their ultimate sacrifice. That sort of added pain is wrong. Yet is it justified? That is not the objective of these protests, yet for many, that is how it is perceived: as an insult to the flag and our service men and women.

Kaepernick took a knee for the Anthem on the advice of a Vietnam Vet, he said it would be "more respectful." Why? It would show "complaint without being disrespectful." One is still bowing (by knelling) to the nation's sovereignty while trying to call attention to certain un-addressed possible injustices. I remember flag-burning from the 60s. I got the point but it still bothered me. An attention-getter, yeah! But at what cost?

People have sacred symbols, they just do. Attacking those in an attempt to perhaps raise awareness on certain issues is very tricky and not kind. Of course, such tactics are not meant to be kind but to deeply jar the public, thoroughly move them out of their comfort zone. Make them look again, pause, reflect, wonder, question, dig deeper. But what usually happens is a knee-jerk attack. Not saying that is necessarily wrong: we all have our cherished beliefs.
My simple answer: No! But it is more complicated t... (show quote)


There are ways to protest without showing contempt for the nation, but this is not one of them.

| Reply
Aug 8, 2018 21:44:54   #
maryjane (a regular here)
 
rumitoid wrote:
My simple answer: No! But it is more complicated than that. The glaring fact in that action is how it effects the family and loved ones of our fallen heroes, who died protecting this country. It appears to disgrace their ultimate sacrifice. That sort of added pain is wrong. Yet is it justified? That is not the objective of these protests, yet for many, that is how it is perceived: as an insult to the flag and our service men and women.

Kaepernick took a knee for the Anthem on the advice of a Vietnam Vet, he said it would be "more respectful." Why? It would show "complaint without being disrespectful." One is still bowing (by knelling) to the nation's sovereignty while trying to call attention to certain un-addressed possible injustices. I remember flag-burning from the 60s. I got the point but it still bothered me. An attention-getter, yeah! But at what cost?

People have sacred symbols, they just do. Attacking those in an attempt to perhaps raise awareness on certain issues is very tricky and not kind. Of course, such tactics are not meant to be kind but to deeply jar the public, thoroughly move them out of their comfort zone. Make them look again, pause, reflect, wonder, question, dig deeper. But what usually happens is a knee-jerk attack. Not saying that is necessarily wrong: we all have our cherished beliefs.
My simple answer: No! But it is more complicated t... (show quote)


Even if you are right, the ball game is not the place for any person to act out his/her political beliefs, especially not these players while on the job, a job that ordinary citizens pay at lot of money to see them do. They have plenty of personal time to activate for their beliefs.

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Aug 8, 2018 22:13:39   #
kankune (a regular here)
 
rumitoid wrote:
My simple answer: No! But it is more complicated than that. The glaring fact in that action is how it effects the family and loved ones of our fallen heroes, who died protecting this country. It appears to disgrace their ultimate sacrifice. That sort of added pain is wrong. Yet is it justified? That is not the objective of these protests, yet for many, that is how it is perceived: as an insult to the flag and our service men and women.

Kaepernick took a knee for the Anthem on the advice of a Vietnam Vet, he said it would be "more respectful." Why? It would show "complaint without being disrespectful." One is still bowing (by knelling) to the nation's sovereignty while trying to call attention to certain un-addressed possible injustices. I remember flag-burning from the 60s. I got the point but it still bothered me. An attention-getter, yeah! But at what cost?

People have sacred symbols, they just do. Attacking those in an attempt to perhaps raise awareness on certain issues is very tricky and not kind. Of course, such tactics are not meant to be kind but to deeply jar the public, thoroughly move them out of their comfort zone. Make them look again, pause, reflect, wonder, question, dig deeper. But what usually happens is a knee-jerk attack. Not saying that is necessarily wrong: we all have our cherished beliefs.
My simple answer: No! But it is more complicated t... (show quote)


Kneeling......kneeling...kneeling. Not...knelling....

| Reply
Aug 9, 2018 00:04:35   #
rumitoid (a regular here)
 
maryjane wrote:
Even if you are right, the ball game is not the place for any person to act out his/her political beliefs, especially not these players while on the job, a job that ordinary citizens pay at lot of money to see them do. They have plenty of personal time to activate for their beliefs.


Why not?

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Aug 9, 2018 02:31:16   #
proud republican (a regular here)
 
rumitoid wrote:
Why not?


Why not??...Because when people go see football games or concerts or shows they want to get away from politics.....Sports and entertainment are not places for politics.....You want to protest ??Fine do it at your own time....Not when i pay thousands of $$$$$ to see bunch of men trying to get the ball...Personally i dont watch football,but i know a lot of people who do and its very inconcidered.....I hope i answered your question....

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Aug 9, 2018 07:16:42   #
Bad Bob (a regular here)
 
rumitoid wrote:
My simple answer: No! But it is more complicated than that. The glaring fact in that action is how it effects the family and loved ones of our fallen heroes, who died protecting this country. It appears to disgrace their ultimate sacrifice. That sort of added pain is wrong. Yet is it justified? That is not the objective of these protests, yet for many, that is how it is perceived: as an insult to the flag and our service men and women.

Kaepernick took a knee for the Anthem on the advice of a Vietnam Vet, he said it would be "more respectful." Why? It would show "complaint without being disrespectful." One is still bowing (by knelling) to the nation's sovereignty while trying to call attention to certain un-addressed possible injustices. I remember flag-burning from the 60s. I got the point but it still bothered me. An attention-getter, yeah! But at what cost?

People have sacred symbols, they just do. Attacking those in an attempt to perhaps raise awareness on certain issues is very tricky and not kind. Of course, such tactics are not meant to be kind but to deeply jar the public, thoroughly move them out of their comfort zone. Make them look again, pause, reflect, wonder, question, dig deeper. But what usually happens is a knee-jerk attack. Not saying that is necessarily wrong: we all have our cherished beliefs.
My simple answer: No! But it is more complicated t... (show quote)



| Reply
Aug 9, 2018 07:48:09   #
badbob85037 (a regular here)
 
rumitoid wrote:
My simple answer: No! But it is more complicated than that. The glaring fact in that action is how it effects the family and loved ones of our fallen heroes, who died protecting this country. It appears to disgrace their ultimate sacrifice. That sort of added pain is wrong. Yet is it justified? That is not the objective of these protests, yet for many, that is how it is perceived: as an insult to the flag and our service men and women.

Kaepernick took a knee for the Anthem on the advice of a Vietnam Vet, he said it would be "more respectful." Why? It would show "complaint without being disrespectful." One is still bowing (by knelling) to the nation's sovereignty while trying to call attention to certain un-addressed possible injustices. I remember flag-burning from the 60s. I got the point but it still bothered me. An attention-getter, yeah! But at what cost?

People have sacred symbols, they just do. Attacking those in an attempt to perhaps raise awareness on certain issues is very tricky and not kind. Of course, such tactics are not meant to be kind but to deeply jar the public, thoroughly move them out of their comfort zone. Make them look again, pause, reflect, wonder, question, dig deeper. But what usually happens is a knee-jerk attack. Not saying that is necessarily wrong: we all have our cherished beliefs.
My simple answer: No! But it is more complicated t... (show quote)


It's un American to be a waste of good dirt democrat

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Aug 9, 2018 08:19:51   #
Bad Bob (a regular here)
 
Liberty Tree wrote:
There are ways to protest without showing contempt for the nation, but this is not one of them.


Why do ya think we play the National Anthem at a football game between two American teams?

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Aug 9, 2018 10:34:14   #
moldyoldy (a regular here)
 
Bad Bob wrote:
Why do ya think we play the National Anthem at a football game between two American teams?


Because the government pays the owners to pretend to be patriotic, and the gullible public falls in line.

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Aug 9, 2018 11:53:05   #
maureenthannon
 
Those Kneeling aren't respecting the flag. They are proudly disrespecting it by refusing to stand with their hand over their heart. They're saying "F You" to the country they foolishly hate. They seem to not know or care that in this country they are free to do what they want. In the Socialist Utopias that the Left seem to think are so wonderful, they'd be killed for disagreeing with or disrespecting the rulers or government; Just take a look at what happened t the people in Nazi Germany, the USSR, Venezuela, etc. Socialism isn't really all that great!

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Aug 9, 2018 11:58:18   #
Bad Bob (a regular here)
 
maureenthannon wrote:
Those Kneeling aren't respecting the flag. They are proudly disrespecting it by refusing to stand with their hand over their heart. They're saying "F You" to the country they foolishly hate. They seem to not know or care that in this country they are free to do what they want. In the Socialist Utopias that the Left seem to think are so wonderful, they'd be killed for disagreeing with or disrespecting the rulers or government; Just take a look at what happened t the people in Nazi Germany, the USSR, Venezuela, etc. Socialism isn't really all that great!
Those Kneeling aren't respecting the flag. They a... (show quote)


Heil Trump

| Reply
Aug 9, 2018 13:05:17   #
JoyV (a regular here)
 
rumitoid wrote:
My simple answer: No! But it is more complicated than that. The glaring fact in that action is how it effects the family and loved ones of our fallen heroes, who died protecting this country. It appears to disgrace their ultimate sacrifice. That sort of added pain is wrong. Yet is it justified? That is not the objective of these protests, yet for many, that is how it is perceived: as an insult to the flag and our service men and women.

Kaepernick took a knee for the Anthem on the advice of a Vietnam Vet, he said it would be "more respectful." Why? It would show "complaint without being disrespectful." One is still bowing (by knelling) to the nation's sovereignty while trying to call attention to certain un-addressed possible injustices. I remember flag-burning from the 60s. I got the point but it still bothered me. An attention-getter, yeah! But at what cost?

People have sacred symbols, they just do. Attacking those in an attempt to perhaps raise awareness on certain issues is very tricky and not kind. Of course, such tactics are not meant to be kind but to deeply jar the public, thoroughly move them out of their comfort zone. Make them look again, pause, reflect, wonder, question, dig deeper. But what usually happens is a knee-jerk attack. Not saying that is necessarily wrong: we all have our cherished beliefs.
My simple answer: No! But it is more complicated t... (show quote)


You ask if it in unAmerican to knell [kneel] for our anthem. No. Not to kneel FOR our anthem. But Kaepernick did NOT kneel FOR the anthem. He knelt AGAINST the anthem. To kneel in protest AGAINST our anthem IS unAmerican, yet not illegal. To do it while you are in uniform in view of the people who have paid to watch you represent your team in a sports game which you get paid a lot for; is cutting your own throat. Unless you don't care about getting paid. Not because the owners might refuse to pay you, but because the fans will refuse to watch you. Eventually the financial loss to the owners will become too much to continue to allow you to disrespect their country's anthem. But in Kaepernick's case, he had gone even further in cutting his own throat. He walked away from his contract, then couldn't understand why none of the other teams would risk giving him a contract. He of course blamed it on racism.

But if these sports stars really cared about the cause they profess to find so important; they would spend their own time to support it. Many people who feel strongly about a cause not only spend their own time, but their own money. Nor do most people who do so make a fraction of what these sports starts do.

As for the objective, Kaepeernick admitted to the protest being against the anthem and flag itself. He said they were symbols of slavery because our founders were slave owners.

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Aug 9, 2018 13:08:01   #
JoyV (a regular here)
 
Bad Bob wrote:
Why do ya think we play the National Anthem at a football game between two American teams?


The name of the league is NATIONAL Football League.

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